• Hokkas gathering
    30’s, Lets get together to play cards

    Water Front Pizza

    969 Edgewater Blvd, Foster City, CA 94404 · Foster City, CA

    13 comments
  • The Blessed - ARAB FILM FESTIVAL SCREENING
    ARAB FILM FESTIVAL GOES THROUGH THIS WEEKEND - FULL INFO, TRAILER AND TICKETS HERE: https://arabfilminstitute.org/festival/ Algiers 2008. A city still reeling from fresh wounds left by a civil war that rocked the nation for a decade, ending in 2002. Its denizens in an ever-present state of mourning for the hundreds of thousands of civilian deaths that took place during the conflict referred to as “The Dirty War,” while protests, street demonstrations, and terrorist attacks rife the city with unease. In this world, and over the course of the next 24 hours: we meet Samir, a doctor who runs a neighborhood clinic, and his wife Amal, a college professor. Both were political dissidents during the war, and despite their activism and many friends who were slaughtered, managed to survive and raise a son, Fahim, now in his late teens thinking about where to go for college. While Samir unswervingly holds onto hope for his country, wanting Fahim to remain, Amal has other plans and encourages him to study abroad in Paris, jaded towards any prospect of Algeria finding lasting peace. Meanwhile, Fahim and his scrappy best friends, Feriel and Reda, thirst for excitement in a hostile city where a walk down the street amidst paranoid cops and extremist zealots at the wrong place at the wrong time can mean a trip to jail… or… worse. Feriel, who lives with her father and gay brother, seeks to break up the monotony of her day-to-day routine of school and housework, and sneaks out at night to get a taste of the city, while Reda, a pious punkrock boy and “Taqwacore” musician, finds himself tempted by radical viewpoints in the wake of a post-war milieu that complicates the teen angst bubbling inside of him. On the day of Samir and Amal’s 20th wedding anniversary as they party with friends and look for a place to have dinner, the adventure of the teens likewise unfolds, the arcs of each character moving into and informing the story of the next, in Algerian writer/director Sofia Djama’s debut feature The Blessed (Les Bienheureux). Sprinkling deep focus extreme wide shots of the city throughout the diegesis, Djama situates her characters in a world where everything is apparently “exposed,” yet, at the same time surging with the unknown, specifically when it comes to how two generations cope the with after-effects of war. Screened in the official selections of the 2017 Venice International Film Festival and the 2017 Dubai International Film Festival where it won the Best Director: Muhr Feature Prize. Screened at the 2018 Cannes Critics Awards. DIRECTOR BIO: Born in Oran, Sofia Djama moved to Algiers to complete her Bachelor degree in Literature. In the early 2000s, she began writing a collection of short stories in which Algiers was to serve as the main protagonist of each plot. A Flabby Saturday Morning (2011), an adaptation of one of them, was her first short film. It was widely acclaimed and received two awards in Clermont Ferrand. This encouraged her to pursue her ambition in the film industry. From then on, she devoted herself to writing her first feature film, The Blessed.

    New Parkway Cinema

    474 24th Street · Oakland, CA

  • Yalla! Uncle Saleh's Arabic Conversation & Reading Series
    The Arabic language learning continues with this series by Uncle Saleh!! Saleh has formally taught both Arabic and English courses. He has a deep grammatical understanding of both Arabic Fus-hah and Levantine Amiyah, so come with questions. It's always a fun time and a great learning experience with Saleh! All levels are welcome. We speak, we write (if we are ready for that) and we always LAUGH! We may form smaller groups to accommodate different levels of Arabic learners. NO BOOK IS NEEDED. Uncle Saleh prepares a different handout for each session. It includes Arabic text, English translation and sometimes the transliterated Arabic to English so you can read along in Arabic while reading English text. Empowering! http://www.meetup.com/yallaarabi/events/51349822/ See above link that describes a typical Uncle Saleh/Yalla Arabi event! We almost always find a table at the back of the restaurant (not the front cafe) on the left. Learn about Uncle Saleh from this article written by Yalla Arabi member Laurie Winestock: https://jewishcurrents.org/editor/sumayl-tel-avivs-shadow-village/

    Au Coquelet Cafe Restaurant

    2000 University Ave · Berkeley, CA

    3 comments
  • Volubilis - ARAB FILM SCREENING
    ARAB FILM FESTIVAL GOES THROUGH THIS WEEKEND - FULL INFO, TRAILER AND TICKETS HERE: https://arabfilminstitute.org/festival/ Co-sponsored by the Association of Moroccan Professionals in America http://www.amp-usa.org/ In the Meknes prefecture, North Morocco — just next door to the striking Volubilis ruins — working class couple Abdelkader and Malika are newlyweds, and very much in love. Living in a cramped apartment downtown with Abdelkader's family, however, has its difficulties as Abdelkader's 5 younger siblings scamper about, forcing the couple to take refuge on the roof for one-on-one time. His father, a drunk who spends the family savings on alcohol, isn't much help, which prompts Abdelkader to take up most of the slack working as a security guard at the Meknes Shopping Mall, and in spite of his hot-headed nature, helps the family eke by as Malika works as a maid for a lonely, unstable rich woman in the suburbs. Everything is moving along alright, even if the couple dream of moving out to start a life of their own, when a critical turn of events connected to elite, corrupt players changes their destiny forever, and transforms Abdelkader into an unthinking extremist beast bent on revenge as Malika attempts to salvage what remains of their marriage. Bit by bit, both characters are pushed onto a twisted journey of self-awakening through which the paths of self-destruction and forgiveness commingle, while the contours of a social power structure that silences the poor at the expense of the uber wealthy's use and abuse of power slowly materializes. A gritty, romantic thriller tempered with absurdist humor and playful gestures towards "European art cinema," award-winning writer/director/actor Faouzi Bensaïdi's 5th feature Volubilis, to put it mildly, is epic, and moves across various emotional tonalities revealing a sense of style that deepens beyond its melodramatic exterior. Going further: and via voyeuristic, Hitchcockian extreme point-of-view long shots, sexy closeups, and observational meditation coupled with a classic score: Bensaïdi gingerly invokes classic cinema's penchant for exaggerated dramaturge while at the same time pausing to wink at its own artifice. Truly: in a social landscape where hopes and dreams can shatter in the blink of an eye: what does it mean to love and live, unapologetically, in this harsh world? Much less pause, from time to time, and laugh in the face of oppression. Screened in the "Venice Days" selection at the 2017 Venice International Film Festival, and at the 2018 Cannes Critics Awards. DIRECTOR BIO: Faouzi Bensaïdi lives in Paris and Casablanca working as a director, writer and actor. He studied theatre in Rabat and after graduating in 1995 he moved to Paris to study at the National Academy of Dramatic Art. His debut as a director was in 1998 via short film La Falaise, which received awards in a number of festivals. In 2000 he directed two shorts: Le Mur and Trajets, the first received an award at Cannes, and the second in Venice. In 2003 his first feature film, A Thousand Months, was shown at Cannes and won the Prix de La Jeunesse and the Prix Le Premier Regard. Volubilis is his fifth feature.

    New Parkway Cinema

    474 24th Street · Oakland, CA

  • Wajd - Songs of Separation - ARAB FILM FESTIVAL SCREENING
    Director Amar Chebib will be present for a post-screening Q&A Co-presented by ASWAT A meditation on loss, yearning, and faith told though the lives of three Syrian refugee musicians. Beginning in the pre-war environment of summer 2010, Syrian-Canadian filmmaker and AFF alum Amar Chebib travelled to Aleppo and Damascus — just six months before the revolution began — to make a documentary on traditional Syrian Sufi music. However the film is transformed into a contemplation on exile when musicians Ibrahim, Abdulwahed, and Mohamed are forced to seek refuge in Turkey and Europe as their country plummets into the throes of one of the most catastrophic socio-political conflicts the world has seen in contemporary times. As he continues to follow their stories of exile over the course of five years, and working alone without a film crew, Chebib crafts a constellation of experience where narrative time oscillates between the sweeping, rare footage of pre-war Syria’s cultural majesty and into present-day formations of refugee life. The three men, now in foreign lands, grasp tight to what remains of their musical heritage as they confront their traumatic pasts and uncertain futures. Bittersweet musical performances and extremely rare Sufi ceremonies form the backdrop of their personal stories of survival, separation, and longing. Premiered at DOXA Documentary Film Festival, Vancouver. DIRECTOR BIO: Syrian-Canadian filmmaker Amar Chebib (Le Boucher, AFF2010) began making videos in his youth while growing up between the Middle East and North America. He graduated from the Vancouver Film School in 2006 and has since directed various short films, music videos, and commercials around the world. Chebib currently resides in Vancouver, Canada where he directs and produces short branded documentaries through his production company, Luminus Films. Wajd - Songs Of Separation is his first feature length documentary.

    New Parkway Cinema

    474 24th Street · Oakland, CA

  • This Is Home: A Refugee Story - ARAB FILM FESTIVAL SCREENING
    ARAB FILM FESTIVAL GOES THROUGH THIS WEEKEND - FULL INFO, TRAILER AND TICKETS HERE: https://arabfilminstitute.org/festival/ Displaced from their homes, disinherited from their professions, Alexandra Shiva’s This is Home: A Refugee Story offers a portrait of relocated Syrian immigrants learning to walk again in Baltimore, Maryland and follows four families out of 372 Syrian refugees that have eight months of assistance from the International Rescue Committee (IRC) before they’re on their own. This heart-tugging, observational documentary refuses cinematic and political embellishment and directly depicts the realities of refugee life in America. Across dynamic experiences and verbal accounts of distinctive generations, we experience the infantilization of adults swimming through an economy whose language they cannot understand, to the wide-eyed wonder of children inhaling this new world, hungry to make the future their own. While tragedy rings beneath the surface, Shiva clings to moments of hope: the Syrian neighbor that reinvents their homeland whenever she visits, teenage girls explaining gender roles to their mother, a wife learning to drive in a high school parking lot, and a father willing to sacrifice his last breath for his family. Above all, the relationships forged between these families and the IRC, which facilitates their resettlement, situates This Is Home as an envisioning of an empathetic and selfless America. Winner of Sundance 2018’s World Cinema Audience Award: Documentary and nominated for Sundance 2018’s World Cinema Grand Jury Award: Documentary. DIRECTOR BIO: Alexandra Shiva is an award-winning filmmaker with over 15 years of experience crafting intimate, character-driven cinema vérité documentaries. Her previous films include the Peabody Award-winner How to Dance in Ohio (2015), which premiered at the 2015 Sundance Film Festival and aired on HBO, Stagedoor (Sundance Channel, 2006, SXSW Film Festival); and Bombay Eunuch (best documentary at the New York Lesbian and Gay Film Festival and Special Jury Award at the Florida Film Festival, 2001).

    New Parkway Cinema

    474 24th Street · Oakland, CA

  • Tunis By Night - ARAB FILM FESTIVAL SCREENING
    ARAB FILM FESTIVAL GOES THROUGH THIS WEEKEND - FULL INFO, TRAILER AND TICKETS HERE: https://arabfilminstitute.org/festival/ Director Elyes Baccar will be present for a post-screening Q&A Tunis, December 2010. Youssef Ben Younes, who has been the host of Tunisian National Radio’s late night show “Tunis By Night” for over two decades, is preparing for his final episode as he moves into retirement. How he approaches his final show, however, radically changes in the wake of a recent incident in the town of Sid Bouzi leading to the self-immolation of a young street vendor which instantly polarizes the nation as cries of revolution ring on the horizon. Does Youssef, faced with varied opinions and pressures from friends and colleagues, address the critical incident on his final show? Would it fan the flames, or ease weary hearts? Drinking coffee, beer and smoking cigarettes at a cafe-bar around the block from the studio hours before showtime, he muses with friends — fellow outsiders and misfits — about what to do. Meanwhile, his family is falling apart, at home, removed from his busy work schedule and cafe life. Amal, his wife and mother to their two adult children, Amine and Aziza, is in the midst of a health crisis after recently undergoing breast removal surgery while trying to mediate her son and daughter’s constant clashing over questions of lifestyle choice. In response to Amine’s scathing, harsh criticism of drinking and coming home after-hours, habits she shares with her father, Aziza doesn’t hesitate to throw more fuel into an already tense situation by unapologetically mocking Amine’s religious beliefs and referencing an event that expelled him from the US by the FBI after 9/11, and continues her life disconnected from the ideals of her family, finding refuge in her rockband where she sings lead vocals. With the reality of Sid Bouzi framing the family’s story, which will eventually ripple though the region to birth the Arab Spring, our characters are forced to come to grips not only with each other, but a social climate charged with the energy of revolution. Tunisian director Elyes Baccar’s Tunis By Night (Tunis Ellil), on the surface, is a family drama that address issues of growth, difference, and acceptance; however, the stakes move into altered registers of complexity once set beside the ripe hatching grounds of the Arab Spring. Mobilizing a hand-held aesthetic that unsettles the frame with an ever-present fever, alongside a diverse cast of characters each serving a specific narrative purpose “representing” the varied, predominate perspectives per Sid Bouzi, topped off with a soundtrack including The Moody Blues, Portishead, classic Tunisian singer Naama, and lyrics written by Baccar himself: Tunis By Night leaves no ground uncovered when it comes to a retrospective engagement with one of the most important social movements in contemporary history. Screened at Cannes 2018’s Critics Awards. Winner of the Tunisian Public Production Grant. DIRECTOR BIO: Elyes Baccar is a seasoned, award-winning producer of feature films, documentaries, and TV series. From 2005 to 2009 he produced and directed documentaries in France, Pakistan, India, Turkey, Syria, Algeria, Palestine, and the USA, some winning international prizes. He has produced multiple TV programs for Arab TV stations such as Al Jazeera's children channel, Abu Dhabi TV, and Tunisian TV. Between 2014 and 2016 Baccar directed two feature documentaries: Cairo 30th and Lost in Tunisia. Tunis By Night is his second fiction film as director.

    New Parkway Cinema

    474 24th Street · Oakland, CA

  • The Poetess - ARAB FILM FESTIVAL SCREENING
    ARAB FILM FESTIVAL GOES THROUGH THIS WEEKEND - FULL INFO, TRAILER AND TICKETS HERE: https://arabfilminstitute.org/festival/ As the first woman to reach the finals of the Arab World’s largest “American Idol” style reality TV poetry competition, namely, “Million’s Poet” (based in Abu Dhabi), 43-year-old Saudi poetess and activist Hissa Hilal proves what it means and what it takes to be an outspoken, politically engaged women in a male-dominated society. Set beside multiple male competitors, an all-male judging panel, and 75 million viewers: Hilal fearlessly takes to the stage mobilizing poetic language and artful lyricism to engage a variety of topics, including gender inequality, toxic masculinity, patriarchal society, terrorism, religious extremism, and political corruption — all the while covering her face, in full niqab, which at first seems like a disadvantage vis-à-vis her male counterparts who have the luxury of utilizing facial expressions to add weight to their verses. Nevertheless, and in spite of the veil: she continues to climb up the competition’s ranks as her male competitors fall by the wayside, one by one, and into the final rounds. Her celebrity, however, has not come without consequence as death threats plague her day-to-day, forcing her to move through life with extreme caution if not for fear of her own safety: but for her two teenage daughters. Donned with intimate interviews and footage from Hilal’s appearances on “Million’s Poet,” German filmmakers Stefanie Brockhaus & Andy Wolff engineer one of the most compelling character spotlight documentaries about a shamelessly empowered Saudi woman for the big screen. Screened at Cannes’ 2018 Critics Awards and premiered at the 2017 Locarno International Film Festival. DIRECTOR BIO: Stefanie Brockhaus is an independent filmmaker and producer from Munich, Germany. Her filmography includes Jam (2003), The Child Within (2008) and feature On The Other Side Of Life (2010). Director/producer Andreas Wolff’s documentary debut was On The Other Side Of Life, which he co-directed with Brockhaus. His second documentary The Captain And His Pirate (2013), produced by Brockhaus, premiered at the Berlinale and also won awards at international festivals.

    New Parkway Cinema

    474 24th Street · Oakland, CA

  • From Under The Rubble: A Story From Gaza - ARAB FILM FESTIVAL SCRENING
    ARAB FILM FESTIVAL GOES THROUGH THIS WEEKEND - FULL INFO, TRAILER AND TICKETS HERE: https://arabfilminstitute.org/festival/ Director Anne Tsoulis will be present for a post-screening Q&A. Dr. Mads will be present for the Oakland screening. Co-sponsored by Screen Australia The Gaza Strip is 28 miles long, and 3-7 miles wide crammed with an overflowing population of 1.7 million people, imprisoned, unable to move due to mechanisms of apartheid imposed by the Israeli Government. In January 2009, Israel’s air and ground forces entered Gaza, an incursion called “Operation Cast Lead,” (also known as the Gaza Massacre) where 3 weeks of heavy shelling, civilian executions, and experiments with white phosphorus rocked the small stretch of land, resulting in 1,400 Palestinian deaths. Strongly criticized by the United Nations, the massacre stands out as one of the most devastating incidents that has taken place in lieu of the Israel/Palestine conflict. Of particular note is the story of the Samouni family, farmers in the Zeitoun farming district in the southern sector of Gaza City, their land and neighborhood decimated during the siege, killing dozens of the family members most of which were women and children. A detailed personal account of the adolescent/children survivors, director Anne Tsoulis’ From Under The Rubble: A Story From Gaza sheds light on the 2009 incident the world so urgently wants to forget, as stories of destruction, horror, and war crimes unfold. From gut-wrenching interviews with the survivors, Palestinian paramedics, a former UN official, and a Norwegian volunteer doctor with a heart of gold, to archival video taken by civilians during the conflict, alongside excerpts from the 2011 animated short film Samouni Street interspersed throughout, Tsoulis’ documentary isn’t for the faint of heart, but nevertheless is one of the most critically important films on the topic of the Gaza Massacre to date. Screened in the official 2017 selections of the Adelaide Film Festival and the Asia Pacific Screen Awards. Director bio: Adelaide-based filmmaker Anne Tsoulis has been a long-term screenwriter and script-editor for feature film and TV drama. She was the script editor for the documentary Breaker Morant: The Retrial (2013) for the History Channel and has been an assessor and reader for the SAFC, Screen Australia, Screen NSW, and worked as an Investment Manager for the Australian Film Commission. From Under The Rubble is her second feature documentary.

    New Parkway Cinema

    474 24th Street · Oakland, CA

  • Naila and the Uprising - ARAB FILM FESTIVAL SCREENING
    ARAB FILM FESTIVAL GOES THROUGH THIS WEEKEND - FULL INFO, TRAILER AND TICKETS HERE: https://arabfilminstitute.org/festival/ Naila and the Uprising: The First Intifada [masked]), one of the most vibrant, nonviolent grassroots populist movements in world history, drew the international stage’s attention towards the yolk of occupation the Israeli Government had set up against the Palestinian people, beginning in 1967, and which has continued to morph into formations of apartheid that plagues the Gaza Strip and the West Bank to this day. Nevertheless, The First Intifada: a movement that mobilized every sector of society: from young to old, men and women, families, college students, business owners, journalists and politicians, united in efforts to end the occupation once and for all, and an example of what is possible when oppression is collectively resisted. One individual caught up in the struggle, and one of the foremost icons of The First Intifada, Naila Ayesh, relays her story of survival in Julia Bacha’s documentary Naila And The Uprising, using every ounce of her power to fight back against the violence heaped upon her by the Israeli Government. Over the course of her political activity during The First Intifada, she was imprisoned, tortured, and interrogated while pregnant, separated from her husband, and eventually imprisoned again with her infant son as friends and family were deported. But regardless of the setbacks that kept arising, she continued her political activity, her spirit of resistance alive and well, speaking out against the occupation and organizing demonstrations while providing critical aid to various committees and unions set up in connection with the movement to establish parallel Palestinian institutions vis-à-vis the Israeli Government for social work, food aid, education, and women’s services. Bacha’s documentary, which includes interviews with Naila Ayesh herself, in addition to family members, friends, journalists, activists and other key players during the First Intifada alongside rarely seen international media coverage and striking animated reenactments, is a story of Naila Ayesh as it is a story of the First Intifada: but is likewise the story of how the movement was carried by an army of women, who led the charge against the occupation and subsequently triggered changes in society which beat to this day at the core of Palestine’s progressive heart. Screened at DOC NYC 2017, the 2018 Human Rights Film Festival, and screened as the Opening Night film at the 2018 Toronto Palestine Film Festival. DIRECTOR BIO: Julia Bacha is a Peabody award-winning filmmaker, media strategist and the Creative Director at Just Vision. Her work has been screened at the Sundance, Berlin, Tribeca, and Dubai Film Festivals, broadcasted on the BBC, HBO and Al Jazeera television networks, and shared with Palestinian refugee camps and the US Congress. In addition to 20 international film festival awards, Bacha is a recipient of the 2017 Columbia University Medal of Excellence, 2016 Guggenheim Fellowship, and the King Hussein Leadership Prize. Additionally, Bacha is a Term Member at the Council on Foreign Relations, an Advisory Board Member to the Tribeca Film Institute and a TED speaker.

    New Parkway Cinema

    474 24th Street · Oakland, CA