Worum es bei uns geht

Are you searching for meaning in your life? Have you ever felt happiness in your life... ...never lasts? This Buddhist group has a great positive, multi-cultural atmosphere that helps people search for the answer to life's biggest questions. Through the teachings of Buddha and historical Pure Land Buddhist teachers we understand better the direction our life needs to take in order to find the purpose of life. We offer video lectures and have meetings to discuss how to obtain an absolute form of happiness. I hope you'll stop by and attend a meeting when you have a chance! Below, you'll find some more information about what Buddhism is all about as well as our contact info and location. In Buddhism, we learn that there are two kinds of joy. Relative Happiness All the happiness we know is called Relative Happiness. Money, status, fame, wealth, family, friends, and our loved ones are all included in this category. Politics, economics, medicine, and the arts also try to provide us with Relative happiness. We seek for this type of happiness day in, day out hoping we can attain true satisfaction from it. Absolute Happiness We are all seeking for a happiness which will truly last. This kind of happiness is called Absolute Happiness. The purpose of life is to attain it as quickly as possible while still alive. Learn more at our meetups and check out some of our topics: The Law of Cause and Effect Six Good Deeds that Bring Happiness Mirror of Truth Dark Mind is the Root Cause of Suffering

Bevorstehende Events (5)

The Purpose of Life in Buddhism

Online-Event

Why are we living? What is the purpose of our life? What determines a good fate of happiness, or a bad fate of misfortune? We will have a Skype session to learn how Buddhism answers to these questions. If you want to join us, please send your Skype ID to "bobo.yanuar" or by clicking this link: https://join.skype.com/SWPEaF5Vu6Wk We also have our Whatsapp group: https://chat.whatsapp.com/IZK7SflIMUPFd7gK9kqLgN The session will be shared only via Skype. If any questions, please contact [masked]. From This Meetup Group organizers

Our struggle is a struggle with the self -- a struggle that must be carried on.

Hi everyone! Hope you're doing well under the current circumstances. Buddhism helps us make sense of things happening and how to interpret things positively even if they're inconvenient for us at the moment. In these meetups, we learn that people who point out our flaws are actually helping us uncover our hidden treasures. Some people's jaw might drop hearing the above, but please give it some consideration. Because of our pride or ego, when someone points out our flaws, we have a hard time processing it. But Buddha teaches us that it's such an important process. When our spouse tells us, "Honey, don't you think it's better for you to change this aspect of your behavior?" we're so quick to reject such remarks. As the proverb goes, truth hurts. In contrast, don't we love to hear sweet lies? The closer to the truth the remarks we hear about are, the more resistance we're likely to show. How can we cultivate an attitude of self-improvement and fight with our ego that prevents that process? In Buddhism, it is taught that we all have stubbornness and pride. We think we are always right and we often go out of our ways to prove that we're right. Let me give you a funny example. If you find a little red something on the floor and you think, "What is this red bean doing on the floor?" Your spouse comes and says, "What red bean? It's a red insect!" You might argue about it and suddenly see the red bean taking off the floor, flying, the one who said it was a red bean might continue their assertion saying, "That's a flying bean." In other words, still they don't want to admit they were wrong to think that it was a red bean. In truth, it was a red lady bug that took off flying. In our youth, when someone points out our flaws, we might say, "I see. Thank you for showing me the way." But as we accumulate life experiences, we feel that "This is my style." And so we reject the advice or suggestion offered to us. People who are truly confident, they do hear others' suggestions and change themselves quickly. Such confident people are those who can distinguish what needs to change within them and what doesn't need to change. They have an easier time to focus on one smaller aspect of themselves that need to be changed. They usually don't generalize that they need to change everything about themselves. They have come to see that it's just one aspect of who we are that needs to be changed at that point and people who can recognize that are generally confident people. In this way, Buddha encourages us not to show anger to people who point out our flaws. By improving those flaws, our hidden treasures get uncovered. Don't allow your feelings erupt before thinking rationally. Just say, "I received your precious remarks. Thank you for taking the time to let me know. Let me sleep over it." Join our meetups to learn more about the art of living. We also read from the book You Were Born For a Reason by Kentetsu Takamori, Kentaro Ito, and Daiji Akeshashi; and have a discussion about it! We appreciate if you're able to support our cause. You can offer your donations on PayPal or Venmo to Bita Enayati at [masked]. Thank you for your support and encouragement in helping us continue to bring quality teachings to you, day in, day out. Stay well and let's go forward towards the light of unconditional goodness together! Eugen and Bita Asakura

Let's learn the meaning of life in Buddhism

Benötigt einen Veranstaltungsort

Why were we born? Why are we living? What is the purpose of our life? What determines a good fate of happiness, or a bad fate of misfortune? We will have a Skype call to learn how Buddhism answers to these questions. If you want to join this meeting, please send your Skype ID to Takuya email [masked] or click this URL Skype. https://join.skype.com/RJbAhZMMSPy We have also have WhatsApp group of sharing Buddhist 1st session. If you want to join please click this URL. https://chat.whatsapp.com/DnBijHRH4pTFQ7W5ymyPL If any questions, please contact [masked] From This Meetup Group organizers

Our struggle is a struggle with the self -- a struggle that must be carried on.

Hi everyone! Hope you're doing well under the current circumstances. Buddhism helps us make sense of things happening and how to interpret things positively even if they're inconvenient for us at the moment. In these meetups, we learn that people who point out our flaws are actually helping us uncover our hidden treasures. Some people's jaw might drop hearing the above, but please give it some consideration. Because of our pride or ego, when someone points out our flaws, we have a hard time processing it. But Buddha teaches us that it's such an important process. When our spouse tells us, "Honey, don't you think it's better for you to change this aspect of your behavior?" we're so quick to reject such remarks. As the proverb goes, truth hurts. In contrast, don't we love to hear sweet lies? The closer to the truth the remarks we hear about are, the more resistance we're likely to show. How can we cultivate an attitude of self-improvement and fight with our ego that prevents that process? In Buddhism, it is taught that we all have stubbornness and pride. We think we are always right and we often go out of our ways to prove that we're right. Let me give you a funny example. If you find a little red something on the floor and you think, "What is this red bean doing on the floor?" Your spouse comes and says, "What red bean? It's a red insect!" You might argue about it and suddenly see the red bean taking off the floor, flying, the one who said it was a red bean might continue their assertion saying, "That's a flying bean." In other words, still they don't want to admit they were wrong to think that it was a red bean. In truth, it was a red lady bug that took off flying. In our youth, when someone points out our flaws, we might say, "I see. Thank you for showing me the way." But as we accumulate life experiences, we feel that "This is my style." And so we reject the advice or suggestion offered to us. People who are truly confident, they do hear others' suggestions and change themselves quickly. Such confident people are those who can distinguish what needs to change within them and what doesn't need to change. They have an easier time to focus on one smaller aspect of themselves that need to be changed. They usually don't generalize that they need to change everything about themselves. They have come to see that it's just one aspect of who we are that needs to be changed at that point and people who can recognize that are generally confident people. In this way, Buddha encourages us not to show anger to people who point out our flaws. By improving those flaws, our hidden treasures get uncovered. Don't allow your feelings erupt before thinking rationally. Just say, "I received your precious remarks. Thank you for taking the time to let me know. Let me sleep over it." Join our meetups to learn more about the art of living. We also read from the book You Were Born For a Reason by Kentetsu Takamori, Kentaro Ito, and Daiji Akeshashi; and have a discussion about it! We appreciate if you're able to support our cause. You can offer your donations on PayPal or Venmo to Bita Enayati at [masked]. Thank you for your support and encouragement in helping us continue to bring quality teachings to you, day in, day out. Stay well and let's go forward towards the light of unconditional goodness together! Eugen and Bita Asakura

Vergangene Events (486)

The Purpose of Life in Buddhism

Benötigt einen Veranstaltungsort

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