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The Sounds of the Future: Listening to the Birth Cries of Black Holes with LIGO

This event is part of the Astronomy Department's Quarterly Lecture Series to bring the most current topics in Astronomy to the Adler audience.

 

 

 

Tickets can be purchased athttp://www.adlerplanetarium.org/events/astronomy-lecture

 

The Sounds of the Future: Listening to the Birth Cries of Black Holes with LIGO

Presented by Dr. Fred Raab

Friday, May 24th @ 7pm at the Adler Planetarium

1300 S. Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL 60605

$10 General Admission, $5 Members/Students

 

Scientists have speculated on the nature of gravity for centuries, culminating in Einstein's 1916 General Theory of Relativity connecting gravity with the shape and structure of Space and Time. In General Relativity space is no longer considered a static concept, but it is a thing with measurable and changeable physical properties.  Another firm prediction of the 1916 theory is that waves of gravity --space warps that can travel across the universe at the speed of light-- exist. These "gravitational waves" are incredibly subtle and the effects tiny:  Einstein died believing they would never be observed. Now, a century after Einstein first postulated General Relativity, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) is poised to "hear" the warping and bending of space as gravitational waves announce the birth of black holes in the distant Universe. Dr. Fred Raab will showcase the amazing story of the world's most sensitive instruments and the phenomena they will allow us to understand.

 

Dr. Fred Raab co-authored the LIGO construction proposal in 1989 and is currently the Head of the LIGO Hanford Observatory.  He also holds appointments as a Member of the Professional Staff at the California Institute of Technology and Adjunct Professor of Physics at Washington State University. Throughout his scientific career, he has worked to improve educational opportunities for learners of all ages.

 

 

 




 

 

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  • Stasia J.

    I'm going to Adler After Dark tonight. If anyone else is attending, please let me know. I usually sit near the exit.

    June 20, 2013

  • Ed S.

    I will arrive at around 6:30
    I will be at the entrance with a meetup name tag.
    See you there!!!

    May 23, 2013

  • A former member
    A former member

    Yeah! See you there :D

    May 23, 2013

  • Stasia J.

    Looking forward to meeting club members.

    May 23, 2013

7 went

  • Ed S.
    Assistant Organizer,
    Event Host
  • A former member
  • A former member
    +1 guest
  • A former member

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