HDR (High Dynamic Range) Workshop with tripods at Grand Central

Come and photograph the majestic Grand Central terminal -- capture all of the details in the shadows and highlights with HDR photography! We have special permission to use tripods during this five hour workshop.

We will meet at 11:30 am at GCT and then you will be shooting from 12noon until 5pm. Tom and I will be helping you out with compositions, checking exposures, etc. 10 participants and two leaders.

We will also be offering a separate optional pre-workshop workshop designed to get people familiar with the cameras and bracketing for HDR photography. You will be taking 3-10 exposures in order to capture all of the details in the shadows and highlights.

We will also be offering a separate optional post-workshop workshop to demonstrate Photomatix, the most popular HDR processing software. Come to one even or all three.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 This was from a recent article -- GCT is turning 100

 "Grand Central Terminal, the doyenne of American train stations, is celebrating its 100th birthday. It made its debut in the heyday of cross-country train travel, faced demolition in the era of the auto, and got a new lease on life with a facelift in its eighth decade. Opened on February 2, 1913, when trains were a luxurious means of traveling across America, the iconic New York landmark with its Beaux-Arts facade is an architectural gem, and still one of America's greatest transportation hubs."
"It is also the Big Apple's second-most-popular tourist attraction, after Times Square. "We are among the top 10 most-visited sites in the world," boasted Dan Brucker, manager of Grand Central Tours at Metro-North Railroad, the commuter rail service that operates from Grand Central. "Every day more than 750,000 people come through Grand Central Terminal - that is the entire population of Alaska that walks through here every day. It is the entire population of the state of North Dakota," he noted."
read the rest of the article and see their photographs

http://www.ctnow.com/mobile/nationworld/sns-rt-us-grandcentral-centenarybre90t0qr-20130130,0,7767514.story

Light shines through a window as commuters enter the main concourse of Grand Central Terminal in New York ( January 30, 2013 )

 

Large gold plated chandeliers hang off the main concourse of Grand Central Terminal in New York ( BRENDAN MCDERMID, REUTERS / January 30, 2013 )

 The 59 stars shine as part of the backwards-painted zodiac set in gold leaf constellations span the ceiling of the main concourse of Grand Central Terminal in New York.

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  • Tony S.

    Excellent. Well worthwhile. The workshop leaders did a great job.

    1 · February 25, 2013

  • Mary W.

    Just Fantastic. The Cucharas really did an outstanding job of organizing, keeping in touch, suggesting things to bring, setting us up, and checking in every 20 minutes or so to make sure that we were having fun photographing. They gave a handout so that you could come back any number of times and repeat a great experience.

    2 · February 24, 2013

  • Pat C.

    Good question John. When shooting for HDR, you want a fast AEB capture burst for a number of reasons which I'll not go into here. Typically, a DSLR camera is designed such that the AEB will shoot as fast as the camera buffer, user and exposure conditions allow. So, I wouldn't be concerned about exceeding the buffer capacity. I would be concerned about having a lethargic AEB burst where you pick up a ghosting problem, or changing lights levels in the scene. Go for AEB speed and let the camera deal with the buffer. The worse that can happen is that the AEB will delay fire, but it won't drop the AEB frame. We pay top dollar for this gear - work it hard and show no mercy.

    1 · February 20, 2013

  • John D V.

    Pat, Is there any advantage that you can think of to using the camera' slower continuous rate so that the buffer is not as likely fill up.

    February 20, 2013

  • Pat C.

    There are actually several limiting factors to "burst speed" with the buffer being one as you correctly identify. There is also the write speed of the flash card (usually lower than they advertise). The burst speed is also dependant on such things as auto focus and drive mode. Of course, a fast burst speed assumes that the shutter speed is also high. And, the write speed of a flash card slows down as it becomes more full, but that's just a technical curiosity. In effect, several factors can pile up to bring a DSLR to a crawl in the worst case. The Canon 7D (I own one) is a frigin machine gun. While I would only get 8fps out it in ideal situations, it has never let me down on an AEB bracket sequence even in less than ideal situations. Most people will not suffer from their camera's burst speed when shooting AEB's for HDR. But, they can slow the AEB down by using a flash card that is slow, e.g. cheap, especially when shooting RAW, low ISO, low light.

    February 20, 2013

  • Matt C.

    Pat, are you certain of this...I always thought it went to the cameras buffer. The write speed of your memory comes to play after you have met your buffer limit as the camera at this point needs to move the images to storage. These write speeds at this time limit how fast your buffer is cleared at which points there may be delays before you can continue shooting.

    Having said that...the max bracketed images for most of the cameras on the list do not seem to exceed their burst rates. For instance the Canon 7D shots 8/fps but can only bracket 3 images. It also has a buffer capacity of 15 raw images or 94 jpg images so I doubt I will suffer any delays while shooting unless I decide to forgo composing my shots and just put my foot on the gas.

    February 20, 2013

  • Pat C.

    The Auto Exposure Bracketing is an excellent resource. Thanks Lisa. It does have some mistakes though, so be sure to check your camera manual as the final word. Keep in mind that the FPS (frames per second) rating assumes you are using a memory card that meets or exceeds the speed requirement for your camera.

    February 16, 2013

  • Lisa C.

    Auto Exposure Bracketing settings by camera model http://www.hdr-photography.com/aeb.html

    February 16, 2013

  • Pat C.

    In June 2011 someone posted an email response from Meredith A. Conti, Metro-North's Corporate & Public Affairs Department at GTC. that states: "If you will just be using a handheld camera, nothing else, then technically you do not need a permit. Just be sure to keep out of the way of pedestrian traffic, stay in the public areas, and do not go anywhere beyond the train gates (track/platform area)." So, it seems that the permit requirement is to control tripod use, and probably monopod use as well.

    February 14, 2013

    • Lisa C.

      Looking back ay my images I was taking exposures of 5-6 seconds so I definitely could not handhold. That was with the 5D at ISO 400. With my 7D I was often at 20-30 seconds at ISO 200, so I could not have gotten these shots without a tripod.

      February 14, 2013

    • Pat C.

      Agreed. But, this discussion was not about if one should shoot for HDR handheld or not. Rather about photography and tripod regulations at GCT. The only time a handheld HDR capture should even be attempted might be in a very bright sunny outdoors situation (with a fast DSLR), and even then is not advisable. With HDR, virtually all the time a tripod is as important as the camera itself.

      February 15, 2013

  • Pat C.

    A typo I think: "with or with a permit". Did you mean "with or withOUT a permit"? Also, by "on the tracks" do you mean at the track-side at the GC terminal, the rural train stations or on the train itself? Thanks.

    February 14, 2013

    • Pat C.

      And, does no photos "on the tracks" mean no tripod use at that location, or no photos at all even if handheld?

      February 14, 2013

    • Lisa C.

      GCT does not allow any photographs, handheld or tripod, of the tracks, anywhere beyond the train gates.

      February 14, 2013

  • Lisa C.

    hi John, Yes, we take the train, and we have large tripods and have never had a problem. Sometimes we put both tripods into one large tripod case, and we have gotten a couple of looks from passengers in the New Haven Train station, but nothing on the train and nothing by "officials". Our current tripod has a Gitzo thin cloth sleeve, so the last few trips we put our tripods in those to make it easier to put in/out of the overhead rack. You can NOT take photographs (with or without a tripod, with or with a permit) on the tracks. That day we will go over their rules before we start shooting.

    February 14, 2013

    • Lisa C.

      Yes a typo

      February 14, 2013

    • Lisa C.

      no photographs of any kind on the tracks

      February 14, 2013

  • John D V.

    I'm guessing people are going down on the train. I have a fairly large tripod; do you know if there will be a problem taking it on the train?

    February 14, 2013

  • Pat C.

    Thanks Lisa.

    February 6, 2013

  • Lisa C.

    Yes, I have special tripod permits for all ten attendees. They do not allow us to have more than 10 tripods so I am working on another date at GCT, to be announced soon. Sorry that you did not sign up in time Pat, Hopefully you can join us next time. Looking forward to shooting with you!

    February 6, 2013

  • Pat C.

    Lisa, will you be arranging for the tripod permits for each of the attendees? Thanks.

    February 6, 2013

  • Lisa C.

    We do have a waitlist of GCT. In addition LOTS of people emailed me to see if we would run a second trip so we are working on that date! Tom and I went Sunday and came back with amazing photographs! I will post some pics from Sunday soon...

    February 5, 2013

  • Pat C.

    Never did get around to shooting for HDR at Grand Central

    February 5, 2013

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