Children's Seed Ball Workshop

Children’s Seed Ball Workshop
“Passion is lifted from the Earth itself from the muddy hands of the young” – Richard Louv
Sunday January 6 at 10am
Seed balls are a quick, fun way to replant areas where fauna has been destroyed. We will make the seed balls on Sunday Jan. 6th at 10 am at Cottonwood Creek Park. Compost, Red Clay, Seeds and Water will be provided to make the balls. This is a wonderfully messy activity and children will need an adult chaperone. On Tuesday, January 8th at 3:30 pm we will meet again at Cottonwood Creek Park to pass out the cured seed balls and get a map of the areas we will be planting (tossing the balls along the railroad tracks). Kids are encouraged to walk, skateboard, ride bikes, etc. along the bike trails for easy distribution. A $5 donation will help to cover materials cost.
Scattering Solutions: Seed Balls as Art and Sustenance
by Roman Shapla
“the world is mud-luscious” - e.e. cummings
Despite the negative connotations found in modern society, there's something magical about children playing in the mud. During a time when they have little say over events in their life, for a short while they are in control. They are the creator. The destroyer. The storyteller. The artisan honing their craft.
Playing with mud and clay is a primordial activity that transcends all boundaries. It is a creative outlet crucial to the child's kinesthetic development. A medium that allows their dexterity to improve and their imagination to flourish. Which is why, in this technological age of blinking/moving/noisy battery-operated toys, one can still find Play-Doh on the shelves.
Most importantly though, playing with clay reconnects children to the Earth. Numerous cultures from around the globe have creation mythologies based on mud and clay. Furthermore, the time spent shaping clay in early childhood imprints so deeply in us that most adults still enjoy dabbling in it.
“When I was little...we didn't have any toys to play with. We made our own things. I used to make clay dolls and animals. We made a lot of mud dolls. Even now, as old as I am, some days I'll be going along and I'll see a puddle and bend down and make a face or an animal's head in the mud. Just model in the clay.” - Delfina Cuero: Her Autobiography, An Account of Her Last Years and Her Ethnobotanic Contributions. The Japanese natural farmer Masanobu Fukuoka developed seed balls as a way to efficiently plant polycultures on land. The balls are roughly ½ to 1 inch in diameter and containing any number of seeds. The clay helps protect the seeds from insects and birds until they sprout. The seed balls should be scattered about leaving nature to decide which plants should grow where. The act of sowing could be almost meditative. Perhaps this is why Fukuoka was fond of saying that children make the best distributors of seed balls.
This workshop will be hosted by Amy Hite.
Amy Hite is a strong advocate of community and local regeneration which she feels deepens San Diego’s sense of regional and personal identity. She blogs at peoplespath.com about regeneration in San Diego. Amy is the owner of Organic Hammer, a sustainable landscape design company and is in the process of creating Union Farm, an urban permaculture farm & nursery in North County. Amy is also the gardening teacher at the Sanderling Waldorf School. Amy feels that children have an innate connection with nature and by encouraging this bond we can foster a sustainable future. Amy currently lives with her husband and two young daughters in Encinitas, CA.

Children’s Seed Ball Workshop
“Passion is lifted from the Earth itself from the muddy hands of the young” – Richard Louv
Sunday January 6 at 10am
Seed balls are a quick, fun way to replant areas where fauna has been destroyed. We will make the seed balls on Sunday Jan. 6th at 10 am at Cottonwood Creek Park. Compost, Red Clay, Seeds and Water will be provided to make the balls. This is a wonderfully messy activity and children will need an adult chaperone. On Tuesday, January 8th at 3:30 pm we will meet again at Cottonwood Creek Park to pass out the cured seed balls and get a map of the areas we will be planting (tossing the balls along the railroad tracks). Kids are encouraged to walk, skateboard, ride bikes, etc. along the bike trails for easy distribution. A $5 donation will help to cover materials cost.
Scattering Solutions: Seed Balls as Art and Sustenance
by Roman Shapla
“the world is mud-luscious” - e.e. cummings
Despite the negative connotations found in modern society, there's something magical about children playing in the mud. During a time when they have little say over events in their life, for a short while they are in control. They are the creator. The destroyer. The storyteller. The artisan honing their craft.
Playing with mud and clay is a primordial activity that transcends all boundaries. It is a creative outlet crucial to the child's kinesthetic development. A medium that allows their dexterity to improve and their imagination to flourish. Which is why, in this technological age of blinking/moving/noisy battery-operated toys, one can still find Play-Doh on the shelves.
Most importantly though, playing with clay reconnects children to the Earth. Numerous cultures from around the globe have creation mythologies based on mud and clay. Furthermore, the time spent shaping clay in early childhood imprints so deeply in us that most adults still enjoy dabbling in it.
“When I was little...we didn't have any toys to play with. We made our own things. I used to make clay dolls and animals. We made a lot of mud dolls. Even now, as old as I am, some days I'll be going along and I'll see a puddle and bend down and make a face or an animal's head in the mud. Just model in the clay.” - Delfina Cuero: Her Autobiography, An Account of Her Last Years and Her Ethnobotanic Contributions. The Japanese natural farmer Masanobu Fukuoka developed seed balls as a way to efficiently plant polycultures on land. The balls are roughly ½ to 1 inch in diameter and containing any number of seeds. The clay helps protect the seeds from insects and birds until they sprout. The seed balls should be scattered about leaving nature to decide which plants should grow where. The act of sowing could be almost meditative. Perhaps this is why Fukuoka was fond of saying that children make the best distributors of seed balls.

This workshop will be hosted by Amy Hite.
Amy Hite is a strong advocate of community and local regeneration which she feels deepens San Diego’s sense of regional and personal identity. She blogs at peoplespath.com about regeneration in San Diego. Amy is the owner of Organic Hammer, a sustainable landscape design company and is in the process of creating Union Farm, an urban permaculture farm & nursery in North County. Amy is also the gardening teacher at the Sanderling Waldorf School. Amy feels that children have an innate connection with nature and by encouraging this bond we can foster a sustainable future. Amy currently lives with her husband and two young daughters in Encinitas, CA.

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  • Derek

    Fast, fun. Kids loved it and so did I.

    January 6, 2013

  • Sheri

    Hi, Just wondering if this is still happening today even with the rain?

    January 6, 2013

  • Sheri

    I'm bringing 8 year old twins and an 11 year old. Really excited about this workshop. I've been meaning to do seed balls myself but never tried them.

    January 2, 2013

  • Jacqueline K.

    Bringing two little ones.

    January 2, 2013

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