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The London Expat American Meetup Group Message Board › Bradley Manning, WikiLeaks and Afghanistan - US Citizen in Guantanamo

Bradley Manning, WikiLeaks and Afghanistan - US Citizen in Guantanamo

Wilber W.
WilberWebb
Group Organizer
London, GB
Post #: 4,451
i could’ve sold to russia or china
Jeremy Harding
http://www.lrb.co.uk/...­



A review of "The Passion of Bradley Manning: The Story of the Suspect Behind the Largest Security Breach in US History" by Chase Madar in London Review of books provides great up to date analysis and many counter arguments on the death penalty charge of "Aiding the enemy"

Will Bradley Manning face ‘aiding the enemy’ charge?
http://english.ruvr.r...­
http://www.citizensid...­

Con...

An overriding cause for concern is the statistical picture, summarised by Madar, of prosecutions under Obama: in the last four years, six people, including Manning, have been charged under the Espionage Act (1917) for disclosures of classified information. ‘Although candidate Obama campaigned as the whistleblower’s loyal friend and protector,’ Madar writes, ‘he has presided over more leaks prosecutions under the act – a use that the statute’s authors never intended – than all his predecessors combined.’ Assange is not on the US government payroll, unlike the others, but he remains unfinished business for the US, waiting in the Ecuadorian Embassy, listening to the machinery whirring around him as Foreign Office staff board flights for Quito and the Ecuadorian government checks every safety mechanism, keen to avoid any misunderstandings with the British. Meanwhile the high-level Syrian emails now being released by WikiLeaks are proof that Assange isn’t twiddling his thumbs. Western surveillance technology companies and defence contractors will feature prominently in the 2.4 million documents in prospect. In the first release the focus is on the Italian defence company Finmeccanica and its sales of mobile communications equipment to the government in Damascus, the last as recent as February.

Bradley Manning, by contrast, is out of the game. His exemplary punishment is required by the fact that he was a soldier working in intelligence. Assange may be a crusader but he was not enlisted for his country, or anyone’s, when he posted nearly half a million ‘significant action’ logs from Afghanistan and Iraq and a quarter of a million diplomatic cables on WikiLeaks, all of them sourced by a thoughtful soldier in Iraq. Manning, who has spent two years in detention, first at the Quantico Marine Base in Virginia and now in Fort Leavenworth, is charged under the Espionage Act and also with ‘aiding the enemy’.



At his work station in a prefab intelligence building in Iraq, Manning came rapidly to feel that secrecy was a blight on everything he valued. Above all, that it set the scene for illegality and swept up hurriedly behind it. Madar agrees and praises Manning’s ‘glowing contribution … to freedom and justice around the world’. At the beginning of the 1990s, Madar tells us, the US government was classifying about six million documents a year; in 2010 the figure was closer to eighty million: 9/11 accounts for this increase, but so does the ease with which documents can be generated and stored. There is also a new fixation with secrecy in an age in which information overkill is the real ally of regimes that wish to march people away in broad daylight. The internet shines a light on everything and everyone, 24/7: a source of strength, for hackers and evangelists like Assange, is always a potential weakness, as it is for their sworn enemies.

Is there a difference between military secrets and those that arise in the management of civilian life by governments which may or may not be at war? On the face of it there seems to be, but the US is on a war footing, openly or otherwise, most of the time, and military security has repercussions in the realm of what we now call civil society. At the same time, the values of civilian life are dutifully streamed on to the front line for Coalition troops, to remind them of the freedoms they are defending, or enforcing. Laying on all the electronic comforts of home is a key part of the quartermastering.

The open-plan area where Manning worked at Forward Operating Base Hammer was, in Madar’s words, ‘a large windowless warehouse full of computers and desks and power cords’. And intelligence staffers with various levels of security clearance. Like the crew of the Nostromo in Alien, parked in some remote corner of the universe, the people in this hermetic vessel enjoyed a degree of leisure culture. The staff in the intelligence area, known as the Secure Compartmented Information Facility (Scif), were endlessly footling online, pulling their favourite music videos from their shoulder-bags or burning disks. Manning describes it in a transcript of one of the chat logs handed to the FBI and army security:

everyone just sat at their workstations … watching music videos/car chases/buildings exploding … and writing more stuff to CD/ DVD … the culture fed opportunities … funny thing is … we transferred so much data on unmarked CDs … everyone did … videos … movies … music … all out in the open.

And then there was any amount of devastating information that undercut everything the war was meant to be about. In space, Manning might have recalled, no one can hear you scream. But the new technology had changed that. It’s hard to believe that geeks and ‘tech-libertarians’, as Madar calls them, can transform the world in ways that matter. But they can alter the discussion radically, which is what WikiLeaks and Manning pulled off in 2010, with exhaustive confirmation that the war in Iraq had been a terrible mistake.



Manning has the information gene: his father was a signals buff with security clearance, deployed by the US navy to Cawdor Barracks, Haverfordwest, where he met Manning’s mother in the 1970s. (The facility is now the home of 14th Signal Regiment, electronic warfare specialists who can shut down discussion altogether if they choose to.) Manning Sr encouraged his son’s interest in computers and taught him C++ programming. ‘Manning had designed his first website,’ Madar tells us, ‘at the age of ten.’ The Manning household began to come apart as he hit his teens and in 2001 his mother left Crescent, Oklahoma, and took him to Wales. When he returned to Oklahoma on his own in 2005, his father got him a job in a local software company, but it didn’t work out, and after a while drifting around – Tulsa, Chicago, Washington DC – he decided to enlist.
Wilber W.
WilberWebb
Group Organizer
London, GB
Post #: 4,452
i could’ve sold to russia or china
Jeremy Harding
http://www.lrb.co.uk/...­



A review of "The Passion of Bradley Manning: The Story of the Suspect Behind the Largest Security Breach in US History" by Chase Madar in London Review of books provides great up to date analysis and many counter arguments on the death penalty charge of "Aiding the enemy"

Will Bradley Manning face ‘aiding the enemy’ charge?
http://english.ruvr.r...­
http://www.citizensid...­

Con...

His cursus through the military was rocky. In the autumn of 2007 he reported at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri and was soon in the ‘discharge unit’, where recruits considered unfit to serve were referred before returning home. He stood 5’2”, he was minded to distinguish right from wrong and sense from nonsense, he was gay. He was bullied during basic training and again by the other men in the discharge unit, who would all end up outside the army. But Manning was recycled. A fellow trainee, interviewed for Guardian Films last year, thought the army was desperate.

I know for a fact that in 2007 recruiting numbers were the lowest they had ever been. They were lowering recruitment standards like crazy. I mean, facial tattoos, too tall, too short, too fat, criminal record – it didn’t matter. They even upped the age limit. You could be 42 years old and still enlist for basic training. It was take everybody you could get. Keep hold of everybody you can get.

Manning went on to Arizona for a stint in intelligence training and from there, in the summer of 2008, to Fort Drum in upstate New York, where he remained until October 2009. At that point he was deployed to FOB Hammer, about 35 miles east of Baghdad, as an intelligence analyst in the Scif. Here, as Madar explains, he could access SIPRNet, the router network shared by the Defense and State Departments to transfer classified data. He could also avail himself of the Joint Worldwide Intelligence Communications System, a closed government internet used by key departments, including Defense, Homeland Security, State and Justice, to exchange classified and top secret materials. After a few weeks in Iraq, Manning got high-level security clearance.



Madar identifies a crucial moment in the chat logs that explains Manning’s disillusion about the conduct of the war. One of his tasks was to investigate a group of Iraqis who’d been rounded up for criticising the government, but as Manning was shortly to ascertain, there was no wrongdoing. They had produced a pamphlet called Where Did the Money Go?, which he had read to him by an interpreter only to discover that it ‘was following the corruption trail’ in al-Maliki’s cabinet: ‘i immediately took that information and *ran* to the officer to explain what was going on … he didn’t want to hear any of it … he told me to shut up and explain how we could assist the FPs in finding *MORE* detainees.’

The problem in Madar’s reading was not just censorship but torture, which ‘as Manning well knew, remained a common practice among the Iraqi authorities even six years into the American occupation’. ‘Enhanced interrogation’ was very much Rumsfeld’s bag. In 2005 Peter Pace, the head of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, had tried to put a marker down – no US soldier should turn a blind eye to torture in Iraq – but Rumsfeld had already introduced a confidential directive, known as Fragmentary Order 242: US forces were not to intervene or follow up in instances of torture by Iraqi security. Manning had every reason to fear the worst for his dissenters.

Some time towards the end of 2009 he happened on classified video footage – which WikiLeaks later published as ‘Collateral Murder’ – taken from a helicopter gunship that had opened up on a group of people in a suburb of Baghdad. He riffled the files for a date – 12 July 2007 – and GPS co-ordinates, which he then put into Google, coming up with a report in the New York Times about the incident: at least 11 dead – two of them Reuters staff – and a couple of children badly injured. The view from the Apache and the events on the ground were not easy to reconcile. Manning told his confidant on the chat site that he ‘couldn’t let these things stay inside of the system … and inside of my head’. He mulled over the gunsight video ‘for weeks … probably a month and a half … before i forwarded it to them’. By ‘them’ he meant WikiLeaks, though he didn’t say so. The footage was shown at the National Press Club in Washington on 5 April 2010 and the rest we know.

Given that security at the Scif was non-existent, it was easy enough for Manning to take in a CD with a scrawled inscription in felt tip – ‘Lady Gaga’ did the trick – wipe the contents and ‘then write a compressed split file … nobody suspected a thing.’ A former FOB Hammer security staffer explained how easy it could be: ‘There were laptops sitting there with passwords on sticky notes. If someone in uniform came in and sits beside me at a computer and I didn’t know him, I’m not going to stop him and say excuse me, can I see some ID? I’m just gonna be like, “whatever”.’

In December 2009 Manning was so obviously distressed that a psychologist recommended removing the bolt from his service weapon. By the spring of 2010 he was being eaten alive by his demons. On 7 May he had a disagreement with a superior at FOB Hammer and hit her in the face. He was once again Private (first class) Manning, with restricted access to the online-party-venue-cum-chat-palace which, by all accounts, the Scif intelligence area had been from the outset. He was set to fetching and carrying in the storerooms. Two weeks later, exasperated, lonely beyond belief, he made the tragic mistake of opening up an instant-messaging dialogue with Adrian Lamo, a celebrity hacker in Sacramento. By now he had passed on the files. Madar doesn’t tell us how the material got from FOB Hammer to WikiLeaks. Christmas leave in the US is a likely moment. But Manning is awaiting trial and everything he did, said or transmitted online or offline is only ever ‘alleged’ in Madar’s circumspect account.
Wilber W.
WilberWebb
Group Organizer
London, GB
Post #: 4,453
i could’ve sold to russia or china
Jeremy Harding
http://www.lrb.co.uk/...­



A review of "The Passion of Bradley Manning: The Story of the Suspect Behind the Largest Security Breach in US History" by Chase Madar in London Review of books provides great up to date analysis and many counter arguments on the death penalty charge of "Aiding the enemy"

Will Bradley Manning face ‘aiding the enemy’ charge?
http://english.ruvr.r...­
http://www.citizensid...­

Con...

Lamo emerges as the pale grey, ambiguous figure that any white knight of the codes can become in the struggle to enter and explore forbidden territory. His real-world bisexuality and his kudos as a hacker – he broke into the New York Times network in 2002 – were a draw for Manning, who’d recently ‘exfiltrated’ vast amounts of information, and happened to be gay and stranded in a desert outside Baghdad. Like a mountaineer who’s taken an exhilarating risk, he was ready to share his story and Lamo was a celebrity climber. He did what hackers do best, spending years moving from ledge to ledge in real and virtual environments, cautious and confident by turns. Lamo’s adventure inside the Times had left him with a lot of damages to pay – to the company itself, as well as Yahoo!, Microsoft and MCI – and cost him a six-month gating at his parents’ house as part of a longer probation. In 2004 an ex told Wired that he’d turned a stun-gun on her. Shortly before Manning embarked on the dialogue towards the end of May, Lamo was discharged from a mental hospital in Sacramento where he’d been obliged to spend nine days after a police officer decided he was acting oddly: as it happened, he’d gone to the station to report a missing backpack.



In the chat logs Manning, or bradass87, bares his heart to Lamo. He is desperate, occasionally elated. Of the huge reaction to the Apache gunship incident he says: ‘video is released in 2010, those involved come forward to discuss event, i witness those involved coming forward to discuss publicly, even add them as friends on FB … without them knowing who i am … they touch my life, i touch their life, they touch my life again … full circle.’ Fellowship without intimacy is part of the healing quality of IT for a soldier in a remote posting. It’s also the self-evident solution to his moral quandary. He explains to Lamo that he’s seen ‘awful things’ on ‘classified networks’, ‘incredible things … things that [belong] in the public domain … things that would have an impact on 6.7 billion people.’

That’s a competitive figure. But Manning was not a monopod life-form in the crater of Babel, leaking and tweeting for gain: he was an intelligence staffer tormented by classified material he’d opened and trawled. He became a down-the-line information libertarian in the process. Discussing the diplomatic cables, he says: ‘i could’ve sold to russia or china, and made bank?’ Lamo replies: ‘why didn’t you?’

Manning: because it’s public data.

Lamo: i mean, the cables.

Manning: information should be free … it belongs in the public domain.

Lamo plays his cards close to his chest. In the extracts Madar gives us from the chat logs, his interventions are rare. Here is another during an exchange about lax security at FOB Hammer:

Manning: bringing CDs to and from the networks was/is a common phenomenon

Lamo: is that how you got the cables out?

Manning: perhaps

Two days into their exchange, Lamo contacted the federal authorities; he kept Manning talking for several more and eventually handed a log of the sessions to the FBI in a Starbucks in Sacramento. Life happens over coffee. In Madar’s generous sense of things Lamo had no choice: ‘he most likely turned in his new and unsolicited acquaintance to protect himself from a prison sentence. How many of us, in Lamo’s situation, would do otherwise?’

The dismaying aspect of the story, Madar insists, is that no one leaked sooner: American service personnel and government officials in their tens of thousands had access to the war logs and diplomatic cables. In a brave chapter on ‘Whistleblowers and Their Public’, Madar squares up to the historical evidence that disclosures do not stop a juggernaut in its tracks or even slow it down. ‘The litany is long of colossal game-changing bombshells that made inaudible thuds on impact,’ from Henri Alleg’s La Question (1958), about his torture by the Paras in Algiers, through Ellsberg to Karl Eikenberry’s leaked cable from Kabul (2010), where he was serving as ambassador. Eikenberry, a retired lieutenant general, advised in the strongest possible terms against troop escalations and called for a review of the US counter-insurgency programme. ‘Despite Eikenberry’s impeccable credentials, and despite swiftly tanking public support for the war, the cable halted neither Obama’s Afghan surge nor the intensified drone strikes.’ Manning had a notion about the real-time sluggishness of politics, warfare, life and death. ‘Apathy,’ he confided to his fairweather friend on instant messaging, ‘is its own 3rd dimension.’
Wilber W.
WilberWebb
Group Organizer
London, GB
Post #: 4,460





Wilber W.
WilberWebb
Group Organizer
London, GB
Post #: 4,461

Bradley Manning was held in a 6x8 ft cell for 23 to 24 hours a day


Bradley Manning treatment in 'flagrant violation' of military code ...‎
Bradley Manning was held in a 6x8 ft cell for 23 to 24 hours a day,
The Guardian - 16 hours ago
http://www.armycourtm...­
http://www.guardian.c...­
The harsh conditions forced upon Bradley Manning in military detention have been laid out in detail as part of a court filing in which the US ...

Three-Star General Was Behind Harsh Treatment of Bradley ...‎ Wired News (blog)
General 'ordered Manning regime'‎ Belfast Telegraph
http://www.wired.com/...­
http://www.belfasttel...­

US private Bradley Manning claims harsh treatment in military prison ...‎ The Oshkosh Northwestern
http://www.thenorthwe...­


Bradley Manning treatment in 'flagrant violation' of military code ...‎

The harsh conditions forced upon Bradley Manning in military detention have been laid out in detail as part of a court filing in which the US army is accused of a "flagrant violation" of his right not to be punished prior to trial.

The Article 13 motion, published Friday by Manning's civilian lawyer David Coombs on his website, claims that Manning, who is accused of leaking state secrets to WikiLeaks, was held in a 6x8 ft cell for 23 to 24 hours a day. In addition, when not sleeping, Manning was banned from lying down, or even using a wall to support him.

The motion also claims that Manning was punished through "degradation and humiliation", notably by forcing him to stand outside his cell naked during a morning inspection. This, his Coombs claims, was "retaliatory punishment" for speaking out over his treatment.

Manning, 24, is accused of being behind the biggest leak of state secrets in US history. Hundreds of thousands of diplomatic cables from US embassies around the world, as well as war logs from Afghanistan and Iraq, were published by the whistleblowing website WikiLeaks.

The information was provided by Manning from his military base near Baghdad, army prosecutors have claimed. They have indicted Manning on 22 counts, including charges of aiding the enemy – charges that carry a maximum penalty of death, although prosecutors have indicated that they will not seek capital punishment.

Coombs is attempting to get all charges dismissed on the grounds that he was subjected to illegal pre-trial treatment – in violation of the constitutional prohibition of cruel and unusual punishment. The claim relates to the nine months that Manning spent after being transferred to the Quantico marine base in Virginia following his arrest in May 2010.

"Manning was awoken at 0500 hours and required to remain awake in his cell from 0500 to 2200 hours," Coombs claims in the motion, adding that he "was not permitted to lie down on his rack during the duty day. Nor was Manning permitted to lean his back against the cell wall; he had to sit upright on his rack without any back support".

The motion further states that Manning was only allowed 20 minutes of "sunshine call" a day. In addition, he was permitted by guards to take no more than five minutes in the shower. On the rare occasions that he was allowed out of his cell, Manning was forced to wear shackles with metal hand and leg restraints. At least two guards accompanied him at all times.

Manning was handed a pair of running shoes without laces for his trips outside, but they would fall off when he attempted to walk. As a result he "elected to wear boots instead", the document alleges.

The conditions were imposed, the US military has claimed, for Manning's own protection under a so-called "prevention of injury" order, or POI. But Manning's lawyer says there is clear evidence showing that the conditions were not imposed because of a risk of self-harm, and were instead used as a form of punishment. "The Brig's arbitrary policy to keep Manning subject to the harshest conditions possible shows an intent to punish Manning," the document says.

Coombs cites an incident in which Manning was forced to strip for an inspection after he remonstrated over his treatment at the detention centre. "It is well established that forced nudity is a classic humiliation technique. The only permissible inference is that the Brig intended to punish Manning by subjecting him to humiliating treatment because Manning correctly pointed out the absurdity of his POI status," it is claimed.

Manning was eventually transferred from Quantico before his pre-trial hearings. His time at Quantico was later condemned by Juan Mendez, the UN's special rapporteur on torture. A 14-month investigation by Mendez concluded that Manning had been subjected to cruel and inhuman conditions.

The defence motion is brought under Article 13 of the Uniform Code of Military Justice. It states that "no person, while being held for trial, may be subjected to punishment or penalty other than arrest or confinement upon the charges pending against him, nor shall the arrest or confinement imposed upon him be any more rigorous than the circumstances required to insure his presence."

Under Article 13, if a judge decides that a member of the armed forces has been illegally punished before trial, he can grant the prisoner credit on the amount of time they have already served in custody, or can even dismiss all charges outright.
Wilber W.
WilberWebb
Group Organizer
London, GB
Post #: 4,463


Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, left, is escorted out of a courthouse in Fort Meade, Maryland, Friday, Dec. 16, 2011, after the first day of a military hearing that will determine if he should face court-martial for his alleged role in the WikiLeaks historical documents leak case. Manning is suspected of being the source in one of the largest disclosures of non classified information in U.S. history.

Bradley Manning treatment in 'flagrant violation' of military code ...‎
Bradley Manning was held in a 6x8 ft cell for 23 to 24 hours a day,
The Guardian - 16 hours ago
http://www.armycourtm...­
http://www.guardian.c...­
The harsh conditions forced upon Bradley Manning in military detention have been laid out in detail as part of a court filing in which the US ...

Three-Star General Was Behind Harsh Treatment of Bradley ...‎ Wired News (blog)
General 'ordered Manning regime'‎ Belfast Telegraph
http://www.wired.com/...­
http://www.belfasttel...­

US private Bradley Manning claims harsh treatment in military prison ...‎ The Oshkosh Northwestern
UN Special Recantour, Juan Mendez on torture denied access to Pvt Manning
http://www.thenorthwe...­

An order to submit WikiLeaks suspect Bradley Manning to harsh and allegedly illegal treatment in prison apparently came from the upper echelons of the Marine Corps.

According to military e-mails released to Manning’s defense, a three-star general was the force behind the marching orders to hold Manning as a maximum-custody detainee under prevention-of-injury watch, or POI — orders that resulted in severe conditions at the Marine Corps brig in Quantico, Virginia, that left Manning isolated and repeatedly mistreated by his guards.

Defense attorney David Coombs disclosed the contents of the e-mails in a post published on his blog on Friday. He did not publish the actual e-mails.

Coombs called the treatment a “flagrant violation” of his client’s right to not be punished prior to trial and has filed a motion asking for the charges against Manning to be dismissed based on the allegedly unlawful treatment.

“These e-mails reveal that the senior Brig officer who ordered PFC Manning to be held in MAX and in POI was receiving his marching orders from a three-star general,” Coombs wrote on his blog. “They also reveal that everyone at Quantico was complicit in the unlawful pretrial punishment, from senior officers to enlisted soldier.”

Manning was removed from Quantico in April 2011 and transferred to Leavenworth following heavy criticism and complaints from his defense attorney about how the Marine Corps brig was treating him. The Army tried to downplay the reason for the move at the time, saying there were a number of factors behind the decision, but also didn’t dispute that Manning’s treatment at the brig was one motivating factor.

“I won’t say that his conditions at Quantico had nothing to do with this,” Jeh Johnson, the Pentagon’s general counsel, said at a press conference at the time. He was quick to add, however, that “the fact that we have made a decision to transfer him should not be interpreted as a criticism of the place he was before,” and he was satisfied that Manning’s treatment at Quantico was in compliance with “legal and regulatory standards in all respects, and we salute the military personnel there for the job they did in difficult circumstances.”

Manning is an Army soldier, and the case against him is being handled by the Army, not the Marine Corps, which the Army had said was another reason for the move.

“We just wanted to get him to a place … where his well-being and his care and his pretrial confinement could be the very best that we could provide,” added Army Undersecretary Joseph Westphal. “He is a soldier, he is our soldier, and we felt we needed to take care of that.”

Manning’s treatment during his detention was the subject of intense criticism. The ACLU called his treatment “gratuitously harsh” in a letter sent to U.S. Defense Secretary Robert Gates. And former State Department spokesman P.J. Crowley was forced to resign after publicly calling Manning’s treatment at Quantico “counterproductive and stupid.”

Manning, 23, was arrested in May 2010 in Iraq after telling a former hacker that he had leaked vast amounts of classified material to the secret-spilling site WikiLeaks. He was subsequently transferred to Kuwait, where he was detained for about two months before being moved to the Quantico brig.

For most of his time at the brig, Manning was held in highly restrictive pretrial confinement. Designated a maximum-custody detainee under prevention-of-injury watch, or POI, he was confined to his cell for all but an hour a day, and has a number of other restrictions placed on him. At one point his clothes were taken away, and he was forced to sleep naked.

The brig maintained that Manning’s treatment was consistent with other prisoners placed under POI watch. But Manning’s attorney filed protests alleging mistreatment and indicating there was no legitimate reason for his client to be under protective watch.

“Manning was awoken at 0500 hours and required to remain awake in his cell from 0500 to 2200 hours,” Coombs claims in the latest motion, and says Manning “was not permitted to lie down on his rack during the duty day. Nor was Manning permitted to lean his back against the cell wall; he had to sit upright on his rack without any back support”.

He was also allowed only 20 minutes of “sunshine call” and was given no more than five minutes in the shower. When he was allowed out of his cell, his arms and legs were bound in metal shackles, preventing him from getting sufficient exercise. He was also given only a pair of running shoes that had no laces so that when he tried to walk in them, while shackled, the shoes fell off his feet, Coombs writes.

Manning was also forced to remove his clothes for an inspection after he protested his treatment.

“It is well established that forced nudity is a classic humiliation technique. The only permissible inference is that the Brig intended to punish Manning by subjecting him to humiliating treatment because Manning correctly pointed out the absurdity of his POI status,” Coombs asserts.

In his motion, Coombs includes a lengthy transcript of a recorded conversation between Manning and his guards that followed a January 18, 2011 incident in which he was bullied by his captors. On the previous day Manning supporters had staged a rally outside Quantico protesting his prosecution.



Bradley Manning was held in a 6x8 ft cell for 23 to 24 hours a day
Wilber W.
WilberWebb
Group Organizer
London, GB
Post #: 4,464


Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, left, is escorted out of a courthouse in Fort Meade, Maryland, Friday, Dec. 16, 2011, after the first day of a military hearing that will determine if he should face court-martial for his alleged role in the WikiLeaks historical documents leak case. Manning is suspected of being the source in one of the largest disclosures of non classified information in U.S. history.

Bradley Manning treatment in 'flagrant violation' of military code ...‎
Bradley Manning was held in a 6x8 ft cell for 23 to 24 hours a day,
The Guardian - 16 hours ago
http://www.armycourtm...­
http://www.guardian.c...­
The harsh conditions forced upon Bradley Manning in military detention have been laid out in detail as part of a court filing in which the US ...

Three-Star General Was Behind Harsh Treatment of Bradley ...‎ Wired News (blog)
General 'ordered Manning regime'‎ Belfast Telegraph
http://www.wired.com/...­
http://www.belfasttel...­

US private Bradley Manning claims harsh treatment in military prison ...‎ The Oshkosh Northwestern
UN Special Recantour, Juan Mendez on torture denied access to Pvt Manning
http://www.thenorthwe...­

Con...

In his motion, Coombs includes a lengthy transcript of a recorded conversation between Manning and his guards that followed a January 18, 2011 incident in which he was bullied by his captors. On the previous day Manning supporters had staged a rally outside Quantico protesting his prosecution.

Redacted: I know what you’re getting at, ok? I’m telling you that we’re not outside the rules and regulations of anything that we’re doing. Period. We’re not. So I need your clothes.

PFC Manning: That’s fine, sir. [Manning strips to his underwear. The rest of the conversation takes place with PFC Manning in his underwear].

Redacted: Skivvies say on?

Other guard: yes. … leave those on.

Redacted: We’re going to get someone over here to talk to you. … You have one mattress, right? You have the one suicide blanket, right?

PFC Manning: Yes. Yes, sir.

Redacted: Shower shoes are fine. Let’s get the doc over here. Redacted. Sit down and see what’s going on. Alright? I need you calm right now, alright? The escalation in your demeanor, alright, weighs us on the side of caution. Do you understand that?

PFC Manning: Yes, MSGT.

Redacted: The best way to explain that to you is you had an outburst. You were moving around. You almost punched a wall. You’re kind of throwing yourself around in the cell. To make sure you don’t hurt yourself we’re putting you on a suicide risk status. We’re upgrading your status.

PFC Manning: But I’m not a suicide risk.

Redacted: That’s not for me to decide. I have to make sure, the brig officer has to make sure, that you’re taken care of.

PFC Manning: I understand MSGT.

Redacted: In the manner that you’re not going to hurt yourself. Right now, I don’t know that. With the display I saw right now, I’m not comfortable with. He’s not comfortable with. Until we get something otherwise, this is how it’s going to be.

PFC Manning: Why was I on, why was I on prevention of status for almost 6 months?

Redacted: [chuckles to himself] I know this is no secret to you … I have plenty of documentation. Plenty of documentation based on things that you’ve said, things that you’ve done. Actions – I have to make sure, we have to make sure, that you’re taken care of.

PFC Manning: Yes, MSGT.

Redacted: Things that you’ve said and things that you’ve done don’t steer us on the side of “ok, well, he can just be a normal detainee.” They make us stay on the side of caution.

PFC Manning: But what about recommendations by the psychiatrist to remove me off the status?

Redacted: Who’s here every day? Who’s here every day? We are. Who sees you every day? That’s all he is, is a recommendation. We have, by law, rules and regulations set forth to make sure from a jail standpoint that Bradley Manning does not hurt himself. Maybe from a psychiatric standpoint, the recommendation he’s given, I get it, I got it, understand, OK? But he’s not the only decision maker. A mental health specialist is not the only decision that gets made.

PFC Manning: I understand that, sir.

Redacted: However…

[Redacted leaves and Redacted enters] [inaudible]

PFC Manning: I got dizzy …

Redacted: Wasn’t dehydration?

PFC Manning: No, I was anxious because I didn’t know why the guards were so edgy. … They raised their voice … And I didn’t … I was getting anxious because they were getting anxious. So I was trying to figure out what was the cause of them getting anxious. It seemed to me that they were looking for something wrong…

Redacted: Something wrong as in a rules violation, or something wrong as in …

PFC Manning: Yes.

Redacted: Rules violation?

PFC Manning: Yes, sir. Because I’ve been here for a long time, so everything becomes automatic. So I don’t know if I say something and they respond. I don’t know what happened. I’ve been in, inside so long – I don’t remember the last time I was outside.



[Portions of the rest of the dialogue between Redacted and PFC Manning are inaudible]

Redacted: So, let’s go back to when you fell down. Did you fall down or did you sit down? Or …

PFC Manning: Ah, it was mixed. I mean, I was getting lightheaded because I was hyperventilating. So, I was trying to stand up. I was trying to keep from falling because I was worried that if I fell, then everybody would panic and that would make matters worse. So, I tried to stand up and I ended up falling…



Redacted: Take me from end of rec hall to … where we are now …

PFC Manning: Ok, yes, I started, I got in here and it was normal. And then I started reading my book. And then, I want to say it was MSGT [inaudible] that was the first to show up. And then he came in and was asking me all these questions. I was, ah, trying to figure out how to word the answers without causing any more anxiety. I was trying to figure out ways of not sounding, or not being construed as … ways that things weren’t going to be construed so that … just trying to figure out ways in which I could tactfully say what I was trying to say without violating any rules and regulation or raise any concern about …

Redacted: Concern’s already raised… [inaudible]



Bradley Manning was held in a 6x8 ft cell for 23 to 24 hours a day
Wilber W.
WilberWebb
Group Organizer
London, GB
Post #: 4,465


Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, left, is escorted out of a courthouse in Fort Meade, Maryland, Friday, Dec. 16, 2011, after the first day of a military hearing that will determine if he should face court-martial for his alleged role in the WikiLeaks historical documents leak case. Manning is suspected of being the source in one of the largest disclosures of non classified information in U.S. history.

Bradley Manning treatment in 'flagrant violation' of military code ...‎
Bradley Manning was held in a 6x8 ft cell for 23 to 24 hours a day,
The Guardian - 16 hours ago
http://www.armycourtm...­
http://www.guardian.c...­
The harsh conditions forced upon Bradley Manning in military detention have been laid out in detail as part of a court filing in which the US ...

Three-Star General Was Behind Harsh Treatment of Bradley ...‎ Wired News (blog)
General 'ordered Manning regime'‎ Belfast Telegraph
http://www.wired.com/...­
http://www.belfasttel...­

US private Bradley Manning claims harsh treatment in military prison ...‎ The Oshkosh Northwestern
UN Special Recantour, Juan Mendez on torture denied access to Pvt Manning
http://www.thenorthwe...­

Con...

In his motion, Coombs includes a lengthy transcript of a recorded conversation between Manning and his guards that followed a January 18, 2011 incident in which he was bullied by his captors. On the previous day Manning supporters had staged a rally outside Quantico protesting his prosecution.

PFC Manning: Yes, but I’m trying not, I’m trying, I’m trying to avoid the concern, and it’s actually causing the concern. I mean, cause, I’m getting … every day that passes by, I’m getting increasingly frustrated, I’m not going to lie. Because I’m trying to do everything that I can not to be a concern, therefore I appear as though I am causing more concern. Or I … Or it seems that I’m causing more concern or everybody’s looking for something to cause concern. So that’s what frustrates me. … Trying to work out the most politically correct way of …

Redacted: [largely inaudible] Let’s go back to today. … The anxiety here, today. That’s not the first time it’s happened since you’ve been in confinement. As far as I know, it is the first time it’s happened since you’ve been here … but a similar situation …

PFC Manning: I wasn’t, in Kuwait, I had no idea what was going on generally.

Redacted: But, would you say it was similar situation?

PFC Manning: No, no. The situation that happened today was more of … you know, I’m lucid and aware and just trying to figure … It’s just a question of trying not to appear like I was in Kuwait. Because that’s my main concern every day, is how do I get off of POI status? How do I get off of POI status? When will I be taken off of POI status? What is being used to justify the precautions? You know … What concerns, you know, what am I doing that’s concerning [inaudible]? So I’m constantly trying to figure out, run through all of those things. And trying to make sure I’m not doing anything…

Redacted: [inaudible] … As time goes on, we have less of a concern, ok?

PFC Manning: Yes, GYSGT. But the restrictions were still in place. And I was …

Redacted: Right. And we continually… We understand it’s not normal that we have someone in POI for this period of time…

PFC Manning: Yes.

Redacted: It’s not [normal] … I guess we’ll just leave it at that. So as we go on, we’re going to lessen your restrictions. They’re still be restrictions in place … [inaudible] But I would have to disagree with you as far as what happened today happened in Kuwait … anxiety attack …

PFC Manning: No, in Kuwait, I wasn’t lucid. I had …. [guard interrupts]. It was like a dream…

Redacted: But, they both ultimately ended up in you having an anxiety attack … controlled fall, but …

PFC Manning: No, I don’t remember falling in Kuwait at all.

Redacted: Well, I can tell you, that’s what was reported to us … none of us were there [refers again to PFC Manning’s suicide status Kuwait] … Us, as a facility, we have to always err on the side of caution, okay. And not just the side of caution, but over-caution. Especially when we’re talking about suicide, okay? Nobody’s saying you’re going to kill yourself, alright? [inaudible] But we always have to be more cautious than that. But you’re saying that ‘nobody else is on suicide watch.’ The thing is what happened in Kuwait, what happened today …

PFC Manning: Those are totally different. I understand, I understand, I understand, where you’re getting that … from the documentation. I mean, I quite, I know where I am. I know I am … I know I am at Quantico base facility. I know that I’m at a brig. I mean, I’m lucid and aware of where I am. I’m not …

Redacted: You asked [MSGT] a question … about why you’re on suicide watch, I’m trying to answer that question, okay? Did I answer that?

PFC Manning: Uh – no. No, with context. Because the fact that …

Redacted: [inaudible] Did you understand that?

PFC Manning: I would have understood had … had I not been … I would have understood had … had I not been … I mean, I’m trying to think of how to word this proper …

Redacted: Provoked? Provoked?

PFC Manning: Yes, a little. I feel like the facility, honestly, I feel like the facility is looking for reasons to keep me on POI status.

Redacted: Inaudible. I can tell you ‘no’…

PFC Manning: I mean, at least not at the staff level, I’m thinking the CO – me, myself, personally.

Redacted: Inaudible … From a logistical standpoint, it’s a burden on us. …

PFC Manning: Yes, MSGT.

Redacted: Nobody finds that as a joy. It’s not a punitive thing, I understand why someone would see it as a punitive thing because restrictions placed [inaudible] … I can tell you that … since you have been here … I wish I had a hundred Mannings …

PFC Manning: And that’s what… And that’s where I don’t understand why the continuation of the policy and restrictions beyond the time recommended by you and the psychiatrist. I mean the psychiatrist, is saying. I mean, I’ve got my own forensic psychiatrist that’s saying now that the POI status is actually doing psychiatric harm and not, you know, and it’s actually, you know, increasing my chances, rather than decreasing…

Redacted: Did you feel like that two weeks ago?

PFC Manning: What’s that?

Redacted: Did you feel like that two weeks ago?

PFC Manning: Yes GYSGT.

Redacted: Uh, two weeks ago, I asked you, like, how you were feeling and you said you were fine, do you remember that?

PFC Manning: Yes, and I still feel fine. I mean, I feel, I feel fine, but at the same time, I’ve been putting in, I’ve been putting in…


Bradley Manning was held in a 6x8 ft cell for 23 to 24 hours a day
Wilber W.
WilberWebb
Group Organizer
London, GB
Post #: 4,466
Three Star General Was Behind Harsh Treatment of Bradley Manning
http://www.armycourtm...­
http://m.wired.com/th...­

These emails reveal that the senior Brig officer who ordered PFC Manning to be held in MAX and in POI was receiving his marching orders from a three-star general. They also reveal that everyone at Quantico was complicit in the unlawful pretrial punishment, from senior officers to enlisted marines.

10 August 2012
PFC Manning's Unlawful Pretrial Punishment at Quantico
By David Coobs, Bradley Mannings lawyer
http://www.armycourtm...­

Anonymous August 10, 2012 3:33 PM
It is a sad day that the American military does NOT follow the rules or laws of America.
Is it any wonder that enlistments are so low.
Is it any wonder that suicides are so high.
Is it any wonder that respect for the military is so low.
SHAME SHAME SHAME

Wilber W.
WilberWebb
Group Organizer
London, GB
Post #: 4,473
Banks: Not much bang for the buck...
http://www.youtube.co...­



9 Mar 2011

Cenk Uygur discusses a report by Boston Consulting Group showing that while bank executives have made incredible amounts of money, the industry has offered very little return to investors over the last 5 years (and even that little return was boosted by the taxpayer bailout after the financial collapse). He also explains how the Justice Department advised Bank Of America on how to fight against WikiLeaks. Finally, he adds that bank protests are spreading....
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