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CFI-Harlem Division

CFI-Harlem is a local discussion group of the Center for Inquiry in New York City. CFI-Harlem offers an opportunity to put your principles into practice by joining other rationalists and freethinkers to work for positive change in society. We organize a monthly meeting and occasional intellectual programming.

Monthly discussions are on the penultimate Saturday of every month. Meetings run from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.

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  • A former member
    A former member

    Reply 2' & 3 to Yen:
    2'. The real objective of the Abramic religions (as seen from their behavior) is power over minds & lives; when they have it they abuse it, sometimes horrifically. That’s why I oppose.

    3. Rather than proof and facts vs. faith and opinions, I prefer to discuss evidence. Then strength of evidence becomes the criterion: very strong, strong, marginal, weak, nonexistent. I think these are easier to establish. And the basic definition of faith (especially in the religious sense) is belief without, or contrary to, evidence.

    October 23, 2013

  • A former member
    A former member

    Reply 1 & 2 to Yen:

    1. In argument it is best to establish exactly what you’re arguing about; this may require yes or no answers.
    2. Absolutely, for those who have power the temptation to abuse it is hard to resist. Often they don’t realize that they’re doing it, or they excuse it by believing it’s for the good of the abused. Other times the pain and damage they inflict can be horrific and they just don’t care. It is difficult to prevent abuse of power, but we can and should confront and oppose it. The Bill of Rights is designed to help.

    October 23, 2013

  • Yen

    Inquiry to understand would be appreciated (e.g. insisting on a yes or no answer leaves the "context" in the hands of the questioner at the quality level of an "assumption"). There can be many shades/interpretations of "context."

    One common goal is "How do we prevent people with power from abusing it?" What do the historical patterns and observable "evidence" suggest?

    October 21, 2013

    • Yen

      Isn't the root pattern/tendency that the person with power abuses/oppresses the person with less power irrespective of other factors (e.g. race, sex, religion, sexual orientation, laws, etc.?)

      October 21, 2013

  • Yen

    Running late, sorry.

    October 19, 2013

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