The Genome Question: Moore vs. Jevons with Bud Mishra

  • March 27, 2012 · 5:30 PM
  • Google NYC (8th Ave Entrance)

Please note the change in venue! See below for further details.**

 

It is often said that genomics science is on a Moore’s law, growing exponentially in data throughput, number of assembled genomes, lowered cost, etc.; and yet, it has not delivered the biomedical promises made a decade ago: personalized medicine; genomic characterization of diseases like cancer, schizophrenia, and autism; bio-markers for common complex diseases; prenatal genomic assays, etc. What share of blame for this failure ought to be allocated to computer science (or computational biology, bioinformatics, statistical genetics, etc.)? How can the computational biology community lead genomics science to rescue it from the current impasse? What are the computational solutions to these problems? What should be our vision of computational biology in the coming decade? We will discuss three systems: TotalReCaller, SUTTA-Assembler and Feature-Response-Curves, in this context.

Professor Bud Mishra is a professor of computer science and mathematics at NYU's Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, professor of human genetics at Mt. Sinai School of Medicine, and a professor of cell biology at NYU School of Medicine. He founded the NYU/Courant Bioinformatics Group, a multi-disciplinary group working on research at the interface of computer science, applied mathematics, biology, biomedicine and bio/nano-technologies. Prof. Mishra has a degree in Physics from Utkal University, in Electronics and Communication Engineering from IIT, Kharagpur, and MS and PhD degrees in Computer Science from Carnegie-Mellon University. He has industrial experience in Computer Science (Tartan Laboratories, and ATTAP), Finance (Tudor Investment and PRF, LLC), Robotics and Bio- and Nanotechnologies (Abraxis, OpGen, and Bioarrays). He is editor of Molecular Cancer Therapeutics, AMRX (Applied Mathematics Research Exchange), Nanotechnology, Science and Applications, and Transactions on Systems Biology, and author of a textbook on algorithmic algebra and more than two hundred archived publications. He has advised and mentored more than 35 graduate students and post-docs in the areas of computer science, robotics and control engineering, applied mathematics, finance, biology and medicine. He is an inventor of Optical Mapping and Sequencing (SMASH), Array Mapping, Copy-Number Variation Mapping, Model Checker for circuit verification, Robot Grasping and Fixturing devices and algorithms, Reactive Robotics, and Nanotechnology for DNA profiling. He is a fellow of IEEE, ACM and AAAS, a Distinguished Alumnus of IIT-Kgp, and a NYSTAR Distinguished Professor. He also holds adjunct professorship at Tata Institute of Fundamental Research in Mumbai, India. From[masked], he was a professor at the Watson School of Biological Sciences, Cold Spring Harbor Lab; currently he is a QB visiting scholar at Cold Spring Harbor Lab.

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The agenda for this event is:

5:30 - 6:30 pm: Attendees Register / Networking
6:30 - 6:35 pm: Welcome & Intro
6:35 - 7:35 pm: Presentations
7:35 - 8:00 pm: Q/A

**Please note the change in venue to the 8th Avenue side of the building.  If you mistakenly go to the 9th avenue entrance, building security will ask you to walk around the building (on the outside!) to the 8th Avenue side.

The RSVP name will be provided to the building security in advance - so please do register with your real name (this will significantly speed up registration). To allow all participants (in the community) to get a clear visibility into their schedules, for all upcoming talks we will make seating reservable two weeks prior to the event.

Google volunteers will also be present at the event to answer any questions you may have, look for people who are wearing "Google Wear".

See you there!

 

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  • SKazi

    This was an awesome tech talk. I know it was alot more informative for those bio-engineers in the talk. But this was an excellent introduction for me into the world of bioinformatics. Working with big data is currently moving at the speed of light or as Dr. Mishra put it at the speed of moore's law. Leaning towards Parkinson's: law data will probably fill it's share with moore's law of storage means. Another great view on this is amazon's support for the 1000 genomes project: http://aws.typepad.com/aws/2012...­ . I'd love for yo guys to check it out and maybe give feedback.

    March 29, 2012

  • David S.

    Detailed and instructive short talk on the issues involved in bioinformatics for sequencing genomes.

    March 28, 2012

  • A former member
    A former member

    Thanks to Prof Mishra for presenting this. It was fascinating to see the current state of the problem from an insider's point of view.

    March 28, 2012

  • Enrique P.

    An extraordinary opportunity to learn about the challenges and opportunities that genomics offers to CS. The speaker was great. Hope the slides are available soon.

    March 28, 2012

  • Mario V.

    Great!!! many things to think about

    March 28, 2012

  • Daniel Z.

    Very informative and good experience.

    March 28, 2012

  • Tarun

    It was interesting and I learned a bit more about the CS related problems in sequencing. I would like to make one suggestion: Would it be possible to ask the speakers beforehand to repeat questions that they field out loud? It is a bit hard for people in the back of the room to follow the discussion when a question that one cannot hear is answered.

    Cheers!

    March 28, 2012

  • John P.

    Very interesting talk. The speaker was animated and engaging and took a topic I was quite speculative about and related it to the audience with the correct amount of technical/mathematical detail to keep the academically minded interested, while making sure to continue to return to the more general topics to keep the whole audience up to speed.

    The food was better than last time and this space is much nicer than the old space. One of the best installments of this meetup.

    March 28, 2012

  • Robert G.

    Excellent choice of speaker, gracious hosting of the event by Google NYC.

    March 28, 2012

  • A former member
    A former member

    terrific presentation!

    March 27, 2012

  • A former member
    A former member

    I want your place!

    March 27, 2012

  • Nayan J.

    Just changed my RSVP to NO. Hopefully someone can go in my place.

    March 27, 2012

  • Jordan E.

    Just canceled my RSVP, hopefully other folks who can't make it will do the same.

    March 27, 2012

  • Nick L.

    I'm visiting for the week and would love to visit Google in NYC. Google came to my business class in Berkeley to talk about Analytics (Phil Mui was scheduled to come but he had to go to a NY product launch), and I look forward to visiting the Google NYC complex! Unfortunately, very far on the waitlist...

    March 24, 2012

  • Yeukhon W.

    wow. 170 waiting. we need to send out reminders so if anyone not going anymore should change RSVP status.

    March 23, 2012

  • David S.

    This is going to be interesting as the central thesis seems to be *obliterated* by the massive acceleration in discoveries of just the last 5 years. The pace of advance has taken off so fast now that I am amazed this would be the subject of a talk...interested to see what he's talking about.

    March 14, 2012

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