addressalign-toparrow-leftarrow-rightbackbellblockcalendarcameraccwchatcheckchevron-downchevron-leftchevron-rightchevron-small-downchevron-small-leftchevron-small-rightchevron-small-upchevron-upcircle-with-checkcircle-with-crosscircle-with-pluscrossdots-three-verticaleditemptyheartexporteye-with-lineeyefacebookfolderfullheartglobegmailgoogleimageimagesinstagramlinklocation-pinmagnifying-glassmailminusmoremuplabelShape 3 + Rectangle 1outlookpersonplusprice-ribbonImported LayersImported LayersImported Layersshieldstartickettrashtriangle-downtriangle-uptwitteruseryahoo
zengeos
zengeos
Gorham, ME
Post #: 114
Well, it's getting time to start planting things!

Today I planted a few hills of rhubarb. Still need more and the rhubarb I got from HD was 1/2 rotten so I'll get replacements of it later this week. I was still able to plant in a few hills of it. I also planted a couple broccoli and a couple cauliflower just to see how they do. If they do ok the next couple nights I plan to put in 20 plants Thursday morning before work, or Friday before work.

Am I too early?

Maybe a touch anxious??
David H.
PostCarbonDesign
Oxford, ME
Post #: 296
I have direct sowed carrots, peas, salad mix, spinach, bunching onions, and raddish in open air plots in the garden. I have my hoophouses and frames full of sorrel, mustard greens, mizuna, sald mix, swiss chard, broccoli, carrots, bush beans, calendula, and spinach. Plus a full hoophouse of warm weather types....peppers, basil, and squashes.

April can be crazy... so watch out!

We are still getting frosts....there was one this morning...
I suggest just the hardy direct sow varieties, unless you are in a hoophouse, coldframe, or greenhouse.
zengeos
zengeos
Gorham, ME
Post #: 115
I've had the brassicas on my front porch, which is covered in 6 mil poly, but that doesn't make much difference late at night...perhaps a degree...so the brassicas have already been getting frosts with no problems.

Hopefully they will be fine in the new rhubarb beds.
zengeos
zengeos
Gorham, ME
Post #: 118
Sigh

Something got to my plants I put in yesterday. Don't see any tracks or anything, but 3 of 4 got eaten. 1 got pulled partly up.

Something also got to 1 section of my flowering Iris Reticulatas.

Suggestions to prevent future trepidation?
Elaine
user 3022592
Portland, ME
Post #: 101
I don't have advice Zengeos, only sympathy. Because of woodchucks -- saw one the other day! - we have to fence in edibles.
To keep squirrels from getting into the cold frame and hoope house I have to put up some remay when it's too warm to leave the plastic down.

As it's warming up two of the 4 automatic venting arms in the cold frame lift - and in the past squirrels have gotten in. So this week I put some left over pond netting (which I got to catch the great amount of leaves from the maple tree). I think that'll work to keep squirrels out.

Elaine
zengeos
zengeos
Gorham, ME
Post #: 120
Thanks. I may have a woodchuck or gopher or some such. I didn't reall see any deer tracks, so I don't think it was deer this time around.

I wonder if I put scented soap out will that help prevent future opportunistic feastings?
A former member
Post #: 58
Garlic self seeded and now have two plots....grows well in the garden.

Emptied the spent manure in the bio-digesters for an organic, weed seed free, high N fertilizer. NO SMELL..no weeds to worry about.. will refill the 5 gal. jugs from a local organic dairy farm and start generating methane to try a power the lawn mower this summer with home-brewed bio-gas.

Chives made it through, as did sage and rosemary.

Planted bulbs under several inches of crushed oyster shells and squirrels have left them alone; ring of daffodils and tulips ready to bloom. Finally, something keeps them away!

Raked mulch off of strawberry beds...pondering whether to spray to get rid of strawberry weavils.....they nip off the pollinated buds and cause them to shrivel and die.

Have a biological spray for japanese beetles which stripped a number of plants last summer.

Heavy snow damaged high bush blueberries, despite new bird frame around them..pruning and reinforce frame.

WOODCHUCKS are a major problem...get a dog and chain them in the garden or trap the chuck...They are worse than raccoons in a ripe corn patch.

ROOTS...they only spread in the top 1.5 feet; so sheet metal or plastic will stop them. They were a major problem until I put in underground barriers.
Elaine
user 3022592
Portland, ME
Post #: 105
Frank, what were your underground barriers?

And that biological spray for japanese beetles you have, -- is it organic? What is it? How get it? We had JB too. I would often go around our fruit trees & grape vine with a bucket & a bit of rainwater into which I propelled them (about 20 at times) before empying the bucket down the city drain.

Our high & medium blueberry bushes were also severely damaged by the snow. I should have known they needed protection. What's your bird frame like? Home made? I haven't read the whole book yet, but the chapter on blueberries (Stella Otto's The BackYard Berry Book) doesn't mention a thing about protecting them. As you can see I'm a beginner!

Elaine
David S.
stereoview
Washington, ME
Post #: 135
I'm pretty exited about my new temporary greenhouse. It is made from some 4x16 ft. metal livestock fencing and a used parachute. It cost me less than $200 and is completely portable/removable in minutes. The ingredients are 3 metal fencing, plastic ties, tentstakes, parchute and rocks.

I will remove the cover and use the fence as a trellis later on....

I am posting pictures.

Also, Renys has 10 cent seed packs now. Lots of herbs, spices and veggies.

Here is an article on Whole Foods

http://articles.merco...­
Elaine
user 3022592
Portland, ME
Post #: 108
It looks great, David! How is it pinned to the ground? Looks as if you can stand full length inside. I envy you that.

We'll have to renovate our 4 season hoop house. Water pooled and weighed down the plastic. In fact because I didn't remove the snow and ice in time (My neglect!) the 12' wide 4' deep hoop house partly collapsed. I think a pointy gothic style arch would work better than a romanesque round one.

But it's worth all the trouble to make it work. Tonight Francis and I ate some delicious mache that wintered over!

Elaine
Powered by mvnForum

Our Sponsors

People in this
Meetup are also in:

Sign up

Meetup members, Log in

By clicking "Sign up" or "Sign up using Facebook", you confirm that you accept our Terms of Service & Privacy Policy