Weston A. Price Foundation - London Chapter Message Board › Finally, soya-free eggs!

Finally, soya-free eggs!

Eva N.
user 24954202
London, GB
Post #: 8
I've just had confirmation from Angela Purshall, Technical Manager at Daylesford Farm, that they supplement their hens' diet with 100% organic layered pellets that do not contain soya. Daylesford sell their eggs via Ocado, rather than via their own online shop, though. I've also phoned the Sheepdrove Farm shop in Maida Vale and they will let me know about their hens' feed by the end of the week.
Claire
user 47390302
London, GB
Post #: 113
That's great to know.
I just had a look on Ocado for the reviews on these eggs and many people are dissapointed saying the yolks are very pale and the shells are thin. Do you think this is a problem? I hear that eggs are more nutritious if the yolk is darker.
It reminds me of Abel & Cole eggs, though organic they are pale and I do tend to feel a bit cheated when I have them.
I do get soya free eggs from France via Natoora occasionally and although they are not organic but are free range they only supplement with wheat and ground oyster shells and the yolks are always darker than any other UK organic eggs I've found.
Philip R.
Phil_Ridley
Group Organizer
London, GB
Post #: 1,742
I have also heard that Sheepdrove Farm do soy free. They have a butchers at Maida Vale.
Phillippa L.
user 72246762
Ventnor, GB
Post #: 12
The colour of egg yolks is a bit of a red herring! Commercial farmers can choose what colour yolks their hens produce according to what brand of layers pellets they use, even if the hens never see the light of day! Some manufacturers put artificial colouring in the food for the purpose of influencing yolk colour to be more appealing to consumers. Organic commercial feeds can have the carotenoides in maize or marigold for the same purpose. Paler yolks may mean they are more likely to be free range and organic.
Philip R.
Phil_Ridley
Group Organizer
London, GB
Post #: 1,743
Indeed Phillipa, and there are no labelling laws! They have to label colouring as an ingredient, but not in the feed of what you eat! I reckon we could see a major change in egg production if coloring in feed had to be on the label, along with other things. What it would probably require is association with hyperactivity in children, something like that, to justify the change. They could at least be required to provide that information on request.
Phillippa L.
user 72246762
Ventnor, GB
Post #: 13
Thank you, Philip. The issue of orange / red chemical food colouring coming to sensitive individuals via eggs is another whole 'can of worms'. If you forgive the terrible pun — it would be a lot better if hens were fed on 'cans of worms' rather than rations containing soya and food colouring!
Phillippa L.
user 72246762
Ventnor, GB
Post #: 14
I have spent some time checking up on Daylesford's claim that their eggs are soya-free. They were willing to give me the contact details for their supplier, High Peak Feeds, and after some to-ing and fro-ing I was put in contact with their nutritionist who formulates the feeds for Daylesford. He was not willing to confirm that the layers pellets made for them are free of soya; the feed has a mixed protein source containing soya amongst other things. Looks like it is 'back to the drawing board' in the search for soya-free eggs!
Eva N.
user 24954202
London, GB
Post #: 9
Thanks for following this up, Philippa - never occurred to me that the woman at Daylesford didn't know what she was talking about (that's the more charitable interpretation of her answer)!
Eleanor B.
user 20445061
London, GB
Post #: 154
I have yet to find any layers pellets which are soy free. Not sure i would use them if i ever did. my chickens are still laying daily on a whole grain ration and some meal worms and what they find in the garden (and a few treats). Soy free can be done in garden birds but probably too expensive for commercial flocks. The eggs would need to be £2.50 a box of 6.
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