What we're about

This group is for everyone that wants an opportunity to invest in an emerging multi-trillion dollars economic in Africa. Africa is the new frontier of the global emerging economies. We are taking advantage of the low cost of labor, market readiness, enabling environment and charging rules and regulations that allows direct foreign investment. From rare minerals, telecommunication, renewable energy, oil and gas, agriculture, real estate to emerging technologies. Lots of opportunities abound.
Come whether you have an idea that needs financing, or you have the finances but need the next big project to invest in. You will be delighted with the wealth of information at our vault.

Through our various networking events, we'll connect start-ups & entrepreneurs with angel investors & Venture Capitalists looking to invest in the next big thing.

If you are an entrepreneur and in need of resources to grow your business to the next level and/or would like to sell your business, then this is the right group for you and you should join now.

If you are a business investor and are looking to invest either your time, expertise or capital in a dynamic business (or become part of a private angel investors group), then you should join us now as well.

All of our business and investment strategies fall under these sustainable development goals, to which every members and investor have to follow:

Goal 1. End poverty in all its forms everywhere

Goal 2. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture

Goal 3. Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages

Goal 4. Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all

Goal 5. Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls

Goal 6. Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all

Goal 7. Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all

Goal 8. Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all

Goal 9. Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and foster innovation

Goal 10. Reduce inequality within and among countries

Goal 11. Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable

Goal 12. Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns

Goal 13. Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts

Goal 14. Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development

Goal 15. Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss

Goal 16. Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels

Goal 17. Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalize the global partnership for sustainable development

Upcoming events (5+)

Getting ready for a great year

Starbucks Capilano

Welcome all new members. We invite everyone to join us this weekend as we have our meeting. Come with your business card, and get ready to share your experience with us. According to the World Bank, Africans in the diaspora sent a total of $ 40 billion in remittances to their countries of origin in 2016. This number is projected to rise every year. Remittance inflows to Africa are a great source of foreign exchange. Money sent by Africans in the diaspora makes an even larger contribution towards social and economic change. Africans living abroad provide a lifeline to their families back home and this forms a sort of welfare system. In this case, remittances are used as an informal insurance against unforeseen economic downturns i.e. floods, famine, unemployment etc. Most important, however, is that remittance inflows increase the purchasing power of many African households. This directly results in increased spending and eventually investment in income generating activities. The average African living in the diaspora is actually an investor by default. A foreign investor at that. However, due to lack of business knowledge and relevant market information, many may not be in a position to act as such. Africans in the diaspora end up falling victim to scams where they eventually lose their money. Or in cases where the projects do take off, they incur heavy losses due to mismanagement and improper planning. Hiring family members, with little or no experience in running a business, instead of skilled personnel is a common practise. When the business venture eventually fails due to obvious reasons, many Africans living abroad suffer emotional stress resulting from disputes or even fallouts with very close family members. At this meetup we intend to provide Africans in the diaspora with business and financial training that will enable them to act like the true African Investors that they really are. Our main aim is to tap into diaspora remittances as a capital base and redirect just a fraction of this capital into investments in startups & SME's. We also provide a platform for investors to connect with African businesses looking to raise funding.

Getting ready for a great year

Starbucks Capilano

Welcome all new members. We invite everyone to join us this weekend as we have our meeting. Come with your business card, and get ready to share your experience with us. According to the World Bank, Africans in the diaspora sent a total of $ 40 billion in remittances to their countries of origin in 2016. This number is projected to rise every year. Remittance inflows to Africa are a great source of foreign exchange. Money sent by Africans in the diaspora makes an even larger contribution towards social and economic change. Africans living abroad provide a lifeline to their families back home and this forms a sort of welfare system. In this case, remittances are used as an informal insurance against unforeseen economic downturns i.e. floods, famine, unemployment etc. Most important, however, is that remittance inflows increase the purchasing power of many African households. This directly results in increased spending and eventually investment in income generating activities. The average African living in the diaspora is actually an investor by default. A foreign investor at that. However, due to lack of business knowledge and relevant market information, many may not be in a position to act as such. Africans in the diaspora end up falling victim to scams where they eventually lose their money. Or in cases where the projects do take off, they incur heavy losses due to mismanagement and improper planning. Hiring family members, with little or no experience in running a business, instead of skilled personnel is a common practise. When the business venture eventually fails due to obvious reasons, many Africans living abroad suffer emotional stress resulting from disputes or even fallouts with very close family members. At this meetup we intend to provide Africans in the diaspora with business and financial training that will enable them to act like the true African Investors that they really are. Our main aim is to tap into diaspora remittances as a capital base and redirect just a fraction of this capital into investments in startups & SME's. We also provide a platform for investors to connect with African businesses looking to raise funding.

Getting ready for a great year

Starbucks Capilano

Welcome all new members. We invite everyone to join us this weekend as we have our meeting. Come with your business card, and get ready to share your experience with us. According to the World Bank, Africans in the diaspora sent a total of $ 40 billion in remittances to their countries of origin in 2016. This number is projected to rise every year. Remittance inflows to Africa are a great source of foreign exchange. Money sent by Africans in the diaspora makes an even larger contribution towards social and economic change. Africans living abroad provide a lifeline to their families back home and this forms a sort of welfare system. In this case, remittances are used as an informal insurance against unforeseen economic downturns i.e. floods, famine, unemployment etc. Most important, however, is that remittance inflows increase the purchasing power of many African households. This directly results in increased spending and eventually investment in income generating activities. The average African living in the diaspora is actually an investor by default. A foreign investor at that. However, due to lack of business knowledge and relevant market information, many may not be in a position to act as such. Africans in the diaspora end up falling victim to scams where they eventually lose their money. Or in cases where the projects do take off, they incur heavy losses due to mismanagement and improper planning. Hiring family members, with little or no experience in running a business, instead of skilled personnel is a common practise. When the business venture eventually fails due to obvious reasons, many Africans living abroad suffer emotional stress resulting from disputes or even fallouts with very close family members. At this meetup we intend to provide Africans in the diaspora with business and financial training that will enable them to act like the true African Investors that they really are. Our main aim is to tap into diaspora remittances as a capital base and redirect just a fraction of this capital into investments in startups & SME's. We also provide a platform for investors to connect with African businesses looking to raise funding.

Getting ready for a great year

Starbucks Capilano

Welcome all new members. We invite everyone to join us this weekend as we have our meeting. Come with your business card, and get ready to share your experience with us. According to the World Bank, Africans in the diaspora sent a total of $ 40 billion in remittances to their countries of origin in 2016. This number is projected to rise every year. Remittance inflows to Africa are a great source of foreign exchange. Money sent by Africans in the diaspora makes an even larger contribution towards social and economic change. Africans living abroad provide a lifeline to their families back home and this forms a sort of welfare system. In this case, remittances are used as an informal insurance against unforeseen economic downturns i.e. floods, famine, unemployment etc. Most important, however, is that remittance inflows increase the purchasing power of many African households. This directly results in increased spending and eventually investment in income generating activities. The average African living in the diaspora is actually an investor by default. A foreign investor at that. However, due to lack of business knowledge and relevant market information, many may not be in a position to act as such. Africans in the diaspora end up falling victim to scams where they eventually lose their money. Or in cases where the projects do take off, they incur heavy losses due to mismanagement and improper planning. Hiring family members, with little or no experience in running a business, instead of skilled personnel is a common practise. When the business venture eventually fails due to obvious reasons, many Africans living abroad suffer emotional stress resulting from disputes or even fallouts with very close family members. At this meetup we intend to provide Africans in the diaspora with business and financial training that will enable them to act like the true African Investors that they really are. Our main aim is to tap into diaspora remittances as a capital base and redirect just a fraction of this capital into investments in startups & SME's. We also provide a platform for investors to connect with African businesses looking to raise funding.

Past events (17)

Getting ready for a great year

Starbucks Capilano

Photos (3)