• New Developments in High Mass Star Formation - Agnes Scott Bradley Observatory
    - This event is a production of the Department of Physics & Astronomy at Agnes Scott College (https://www.agnesscott.edu/physics/) made possible with support from the Georgia Space Grant Consortium. - It is free and open to the public. - RSVPs are not required to attend. - Seating is on a first-come basis. - Doors open at 7:30 pm. - The lecture begins at 8:00. - Refreshments will be served. - Refer to this page (https://www.agnesscott.edu/bradleyobservatory/directions-and-parking.html) for directions as well as the notes at the bottom of the description below. - A planetarium show and viewing with the observatory telescopes (weather permitting) will follow the lecture. ______________________ New Developments in High Mass Star Formation - Agnes Scott Bradley Observatory Theresa "Terry" Melo, Agnes Scott '19 Sara Solomon, Agnes Scott '20 Our understanding of massive star formation (MSF) is informed by observations of ultracompact (UC) HII regions, which consist of ionized hydrogen around young, high mass stars. During the summer of 2018, Theresa Melo (ASC ‘19) and Sara Sloman (ASC ‘20) completed NSF-supported research in MSF with Dr. Chris De Pree, as part of the STEM Scholars Program at Agnes Scott College. Using Very Large Array (VLA) observations of the MSF region W49A taken in 1994 and 2015, students Melo and Sloman learned the data reduction process, and created a final multi-configuration image of W49A in both special lines (Radio Recombination Lines) and the radio continuum. During this fall semester, student researchers have been able to continue the reduction and analysis of these datum to identify significant differences between emission from 1994 and 2015. This months’s talk will introduce the basics of high mass star formation, radio observations, and star formation in W49A region, one of the most luminous star forming regions in the Milky Way. About the speakers Theresa “Terry” Melo is a senior majoring in Astrophysics from Chicago, Illinois. She is a member of Posse 3, a leadership scholarship that identifies, recruits, and trains a group of students that are sent together to college. She hopes to go to graduate school to obtain her graduate degree in astronomy. Her interests include radio astronomy, stellar evolution, and computational applications. At Agnes Scott, she is a student researcher working with Dr. Chris De Pree on Massive Star Formation and a tutor at the Center for Writing and speaking. Sara Sloman is a junior from Johns Creek, Georgia majoring in Astrophysics and Math. She hopes to continue her studies after graduating from Agnes Scott, pursuing a graduate degree in physics or mathematics. Sara is a current Georgia Space Grant Consortium outreach fellow for the Bradley Observatory and is also a student researcher working with Dr. De Pree on Massive Star Formation. She serves on the executive board as the treasurer for both the Society of Physics Students and the Catholic Student Organization, and is an active member of the GEMS living-learning community on campus. Sara is also a lifetime member of the Girl Scouts. ______________________ Parking Handicapped-accessible parking is available adjacent to the observatory. Other visitors are requested to use campus parking lots accessible via E. Dougherty St. and South McDonough St. There is on-street parking along E. Dougherty, or in the parking lot to your right past the Mary Brown Bullock Science Center. Additional parking is available in the West Parking Facility on S. McDonough St. Follow Dougherty to the four-way stop, either turn left and take your first left into the parking lot, or turn right and park in the large parking deck on the left.

    The Bradley Observatory of Agnes Scott College

    E. Dougherty Street · Decatur, GA

  • *SOLD OUT* Yerkes Research Center Field Station Open House - Fall 2018
    - This event is a production of Yerkes National Primate Research Center (http://www.yerkes.emory.edu/index.html) of Emory University. - An RSVP here does *not* count as an RSVP for the open house. - You *must* follow the instructions below to RSVP officially. - Tours run continually from 8:30 am until 10:30 am. - You will receive driving directions and other details by email from Yerkes no later than several days prior to the open house. - Please direct all questions you have about this event or about your RSVP to [masked]. __________ Yerkes Research Center Field Station Open House - Fall 2018 Yerkes National Primate Research Center of Emory University has cordially invited members of the Atlanta Science Tavern to their fall open house for their Field Station in Lawrenceville the morning of Saturday, October 20, 2018. The first tour group will depart at 8:30 am and the last one at 10:30 am. Tours run continually. Mandatory RSVP instructions Please RSVP to [masked] as soon as possible and no later than Friday, September 28. To RSVP you *must* send an email to [masked] with all of the following: 1) FSOH in subject; 2) First and last name of each person in your group; 3) Ages of those 17 and younger; 4) Street address; 5) Email address; 6) Phone number; 7) "Atlanta Science Tavern" as your affiliation with Yerkes; and 8) If you plan to bring a service animal (Yerkes will follow up for more information). Note: if this events reaches capacity before the RSVP deadline, you will placed on the waiting list. Be patient, it may take some time for you to receive a confirmation of your email. You will receive driving directions and other details from Yerkes several days prior to the event. Note: if the event reaches event capacity before the RSVP deadline, Yerkes will place you on the waiting list Email [masked] with any questions regarding the status of your RSVP. Special notes • Children 1 year old or older are welcome. Those ages 1 to 4 must be in strollers. • Parking is limited, so please carpool. • Dress for outdoors and wear closed-toe shoes. • Photography is prohibited. Yerkes appreciates donations of empty paper towel and toilet paper rolls, phone books and unopened boxes of plain Cheerios, Corn Flakes and Rice Krispies. They give these to the animals as part of their enrichment program. Yerkes also welcomes financial donations to help support their research: http://www.yerkes.emory.edu/support/index.html.

    Yerkes Research Center Field Station

    Location to be Announced by Email · Lawrenceville, GA

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  • Ethnobotany and the relationship between plants and people around the world
    - This event is a production of the Atlanta Botanical Garden as part of their Science Cafe series. - Although the cafe itself is free, regular charges for Garden admission apply. - Seating is on a first-come basis; RSVPs are not required to attend. Maria Fadiman, Florida Atlantic University Maria Fadiman is an associate professor in the department of Geosciences at Florida Atlantic University and a National Geographic Emerging Explorer. She researches the human/environmental aspect of conservation, focusing on ethnobotany, the study of the relationship between people and plants in rural areas throughout the globe. She has been featured twice as a TEDx speaker in Berkeley, CA and Cancún, Mexico. In addition to her peer reviewed academic publications, she is one of the invited contributors to the book, Global Chorus, along with other such as the Dalai Lama and Jane Goodall. Her rainforest essay was recently published in the Voices section of the American Way Magazine. She loves teaching and was chosen for the Innovation in Teaching award for the College of Science, earned the Degree of Difference Award in “Recognition of positive impact on and special contributions to students” and was twice a finalist for the Distinguished Teacher of the Year award for the university. She earned her PhD at the University of Texas at Austin, her MA from Tulane University and her BA from Vassar College.

    Atlanta Botanical Garden Mershon Hall

    1345 Piedmont Avenue NE · Atlanta, GA

  • 200 Years of "Frankenstein" and its impact on culture and thinking about science
    - This event is a production of the Atlanta Science Tavern. - It is free and open to the public. - Seating is on a first-come basis. - RSVPs are not required to attend nor do they reserve seats. - Doors open at 6:00 pm for early arrival. - Gather for dinner by 7:00. - The evening's presentation gets under way around 7:45. __________ 200 Years of "Frankenstein" and its impact on culture and thinking about science Sidney Perkowitz and Eddy von Mueller, Editors "Frankenstein: How A Monster Became an Icon: The Science and Enduring Allure of Mary Shelley's Creation" https://amzn.to/2P3xR9w This year is the 200th birthday of one of the most famous novels ever, Frankenstein – a remarkable book with a remarkable backstory. Its author, Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, was only 18 when she began a tale that has inspired a multitude of books and films. Her portrayal of a tormented being created by the scientist Victor Frankenstein is highly relevant in today’s world, as science advances and we face the possibility of ourselves modifying and creating life. Our talk will introduce you to Mary and her circle including her husband, the famous poet Percy Bysshe Shelley. We’ll explain how Mary came to write Frankenstein; present excerpts from the book and clips from Frankenstein films to show how the story has evolved and how Frankenstein and the media have influenced each other; discuss the science of Mary’s time that let her imagine that a dead being could be re-animated; and finish by showing how this story still serves as a guide to scientific ethics and science in society. About our speakers Eddy Von Mueller is a writer, filmmaker, and historian in Atlanta. Formerly a Senior Lecturer of Film and Media Studies at the Emory College of Arts and Sciences, he has published in the scholarly and popular press on subjects ranging animation aesthetics to silent adaptations of Shakespeare to the nature films produced by the Walt Disney Company. His most recent feature film, "The Lady From Stockholm," played over thirty film festivals around the world. Sidney Perkowitz, a long-time friend of the Atlanta Science Tavern, is the Charles Howard Candler Professor of Physics Emeritus at Emory University where he has produced over 100 research papers and books. In addition, he is an internationally recognized science communicator, having presented science for non-scientists in eight books as well as in articles in numerous publications and in on-air interviews. Sidney is Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and has received a Lifetime Achievement award from the Society for Literature, Science and the Arts.

    Manuel's Tavern

    602 N. Highland Ave NE · Atlanta, GA

  • How to Walk on Water and Climb up Walls - an author talk at the Carter Library
    - This event is a production of the Jimmy Carter Presidential Library and Museum. - It is free and open to the public. - RSVPs are not required to attend. - Doors open at 6:30 pm. - Books will be available for purchase and signing by the author. "How to Walk on Water and Climb up Walls: Animal Movement and the Robots of the Future" David L. Hu Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering Adjunct Professor of Physics Georgia Institute of Technology Insects walk on water, snakes slither, and fish swim. Animals move with astounding grace, speed, and versatility: how do they do it, and what can we learn from them? In "How to Walk on Water and Climb up Walls," David Hu takes readers on an accessible, wondrous journey into the world of animal motion. From basement labs at MIT to the rain forests of Panama, Hu shows how animals have adapted and evolved to traverse their environments, taking advantage of physical laws with results that are startling and ingenious. In turn, the latest discoveries about animal mechanics are inspiring scientists to invent robots and devices that move with similar elegance and efficiency. Integrating biology, engineering, physics, and robotics, "How to Walk on Water and Climb up Walls" demystifies the remarkable mechanics behind animal locomotion.

    Jimmy Carter Presidential Library & Museum

    441 Freedom Parkway · Atlanta, GA

  • Free screening of "The Most Unknown" at the Jimmy Carter Presidential Library
    - This event is a production of the Atlanta Science Tavern with the kind assistance of the Jimmy Carter Presidential Library and Museum. - It is free and open to the public; RSVPs are not required to attend; seating is on a first-come basis. - Doors open at 5:45 pm; the film will start promptly at 6:30; it will be followed by a panel discussion. About the film The Most Unknown is an epic documentary film that sends nine scientists to extraordinary parts of the world to uncover unexpected answers to some of humanity’s biggest questions. How did life begin? What is time? What is consciousness? How much do we really know? By introducing researchers from diverse backgrounds for the first time, then dropping them into new, immersive field work they previously hadn’t tackled, the film pushes the boundaries of how science storytelling is approached. What emerges is a deeply human trip to the foundations of discovery and a powerful reminder that the unanswered questions are the most crucial ones to pose. About the panel (preliminary) The screening will be followed by a panel discussion which will include some Atlanta's own "most unknown" researchers. They will reflect on what the film means to them and will also be available to answers questions about related areas of research. Jennifer B. Glass (facilitator) - Jennifer Glass is a biogeochemist and principal investigator of the Glass Lab within the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at Georgia Tech. Her studies include environmental controls on greenhouse gas cycling and, in particular, how one such gas, nitrous oxide, may have warmed the early Earth making life here possible when the Sun was much dimmer. Misty C. Bentz - Misty Bentz is an observational extragalactic astronomer in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Georgia State University. Her research focuses on active galactic nuclei and mass measurements of supermassive black holes. Misty will be one of the first investigators to use NASA's James Webb Space Telescope scheduled for launch in 2021. Nicholas C. Speller - Nicholas Speller is a postdoctoral researcher in the lab of Professor Amanda M. Stockton within Georgia Tech's School of Chemistry and Biochemistry. He is involved in designing a device to analyze the chemistry of the surface of Europa as part of a future mission to Jupiter's icy moon.

    Jimmy Carter Presidential Library & Museum

    441 Freedom Parkway · Atlanta, GA

  • Mushrooms and trees - Trees Atlanta speaker series
    - This event is a production of Trees Atlanta. - It is free and open to the public, but registration is requested here http://bit.ly/2yygln2. - Limited parking is available in the vicinity of the Treehouse, so please consider walking, biking, or taking public transit. Speakers: Elliott Horner and Sam Landes Fungi are amazing organisms that have big impacts on trees. Some mushrooms help trees stay well watered and assist with mineral nutrition. Many of these mushrooms can be choice edibles. Fungi also clean up dead trees so that we aren't waist deep in old wood. But there are also fungi that attack and kill trees, eating them from the inside out. This talk will explore the lifestyles of mushrooms that trees need, the fungi that trees fear, and the rotters that run the cleanup crew. This talk will explore the lifestyles of mushrooms that trees need, the fungi that trees fear, and the rotters that run the cleanup crew. About the speakers Elliott Horner spent 4 ½ years failing to kill Christmas trees, but managed anyway to finish school as a forest pathologist. Time spent in the woods as a kid made it easy to seek a biology path. Only had one job outdoors, in a Longleaf Pine nature preserve, then that career path went indoors more than outdoors. A day in the woods – preferably piney woods - is still the favored choice though, especially among the diverse plant communities of the southeast. Sam Landes is a retired Montessori Teacher. He grew up in Central Illinois where his mother took him morel mushroom hunting beginning at the age of 5. He has been the Treasurer of the Mushroom Club of Georgia since 2010. His wife, Dr. Cornelia Cho, is the President of the club. Cornelia and Sam are both members of the North American Mycological Association (NAMA). Sam is the Foray Committee Chair for NAMA. Sam and Cornelia travel around the country joining other mushroom enthusiasts in hunting for mushrooms.

    Trees Atlanta Tree House

    112 Krog Street · Atlanta, GA