What we're about

Are you looking to connect with people who are wide awake or waking up? Are you ready for the end of your excuse that "I can't find anyone like me in Las Vegas. Vegas is just the party scene." Have you been looking for a place where you can speak your mind and the group is non-judgmental? Our group has grown from a weekly discussion group into more of a dynamic, active community. Every week we are connecting with one or two more solid individuals and they almost all say the same thing: I have found it. It's like a new pair of jeans that fit perfect the first time you wear them.

In the broad spectrum of Enlightenment and Spirituality the focus of this group is Consciousness and Awareness. In pop-culture terms, most of us are interested in getting out of the default mode of allowing our ego to control our thoughts and actions and getting very presently into the Now. Once we stop allowing our stories to control our lives we look to be come more aware, both of the environment that we have traditionally viewed as external as well as the universe that we discover when we look within.

The group itself has no dogma nor leader; each individual member is on their own path, has their own personal paradigm, and a number of them have a teacher or guru to whom they turn for guidance. Along the way many of us have studied material from teachers such as Eckhart Tolle, Adyashanti, Richard Moss, Richard Rudd, Alan Watts, J. Krishnamurti and U.G. Krishnamurti, Louix Dor Dempriey (Bhagavan Sri Pranananda), Osho, Franklin Merrell-Wolff, Tim Freke, Vernon Howard, Ramana Maharshi, Nisargardatta Maharaj, Richard Rose, and Douglas Harding. Many of us have found our way to this material through authors and speakers such as Deepak Chopra, Esther and Jerry Hicks (Abraham), Byron Katie, Wayne Dyer, Marianne Williamson, James Redfield (The Celestine Prophecy), Gary Zukav, Leonard Jacobson, David Hawkins, Joe Vitale, Michael Beckwith, Doreen Virtue, Seth, Michael, Emmanuel, and through gateways such as A Course In Miracles, The Secret, and What the Bleep Do We Know. We also seem to learn from the most visible sages and philosophical systems like Siddhartha Guatma (Buddha) and Buddhism; Lao Tzu and Taoism; Hinduism; the Vedas, Gitas and Upanishads; and yes, the teachings of Jesus himself (and contrasting it with the religion that was created around his teachings hundreds of years after his life on Earth.)

Ultimately, however, we emphasize the divinity within ourselves. Our teachers have done what they can to point towards the Truth, but many of us have come to realize the danger of placing authority outside of ourselves. The diversity in our education allows us to draw from the various thought systems that came before us so that we can build our own truth, our own personal paradigm. We strive to create an open atmosphere so that our members can feel comfortable in discussing their ideas, testing them out to see if they fit. Some of us have even found through this process that rather than building our paradigm we are stripping it down to the core.

Whether you are new to these concepts or already have a solid foundation, the Awareness Group is a good place to connect with others that are right there with you. The Awareness Group is a great place to get started in exposing yourself to the wide range of topics found under the umbrella of Spirituality.

Namaste.

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GETTING STARTED WITH THE AWARENESS GROUP

We highly recommend you check out the following sections of this site:

* About Us section (link in the left column) to learn more about our focus.

* Message Board >> "Getting Started: The Essential Information." (To learn how to set Meetup.com to send you only one email per day from this group.)

* Message Board >> "Meetups EVERY DAY of the Week" for other Meetup groups.

* The Calendar to check out the upcoming events.

In addition to the gatherings hosted by the Awareness Group itself, you will find that we repost events from other groups as well. Meetup.com has yet to implement a tool to allow groups to neatly cross promote events. Therefore, when we repost an event on this site we close the RSVPs and provide a link to the Meetup group who is actually organizing the event. If you see an event that says "No Spots Left" you will find a link in the body of the post that will take you to where you can properly RSVP and get a more accurate attendance count.

Upcoming events (5+)

AA "Back to Basics" Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting

The Meeting Space

What can you expect when you attend a 12-step or Alcoholics Anonymous meeting? If you've never attended one, you likely have fears and reservations. Common Myths and Preconceptions These things you may think happen at 12-step meetings, but may by myths rather than typical occurrences. You have to stand up and say, "I am an alcoholic." You have to talk in the meeting. You have to participate in group hugs. You have to pray. You are joining a cult. How It Works What is the reality for most meetings? The meeting might be held in a building connected with a church or a community center. You arrive to find most of the people you see are there for the Alcoholics Anonymous meeting outside socializing. Inside of the room they may be setting books out for those who do not have their own or setting up the coffee station. You take a seat anywhere you feel most comfortable and as people pass by, some say hello, some nod, some stop and introduce themselves, and some keep to themselves. One or two people sit in the front of the room at a table. He/she are the meeting chairperson(s) for that particular day and will lead the meeting. They may ask you to read from an AA literature handout, but you are welcome to decline. The meeting begins with the chairperson reading the AA Preamble, then leading a group prayer, the Serenity Prayer (short version). Afterward, different members of the meeting read brief AA literature. The chairperson(s) asks if there are any newcomers, or first-timers, attending the meeting who would like to introduce themselves by their first name. It is not required to introduce yourself as a newcomer if you are not comfortable yet. Sharing Experience, Strength, and Hope Different meetings have different ways of doing things but for the most part, they run the same. During the meeting, people simply begin sharing. In some meetings, people are randomly called on. Speaker's meetings feature a person chosen to talk about their experience, strength, and hope in regards to their recovery. Each starts off by introducing themselves as, "Hello, my name is (first name) and I'm an alcoholic." Everyone responds with, "Hello (first name)!" After they complete their share everyone in the room thanks them. Then the next person can speak up. After everyone completes sharing, the chairperson asks if there are any AA-related announcements. Then they announce that it is time for the Lord's Prayer, and everyone stands in a large circle, holding hands, and recites the prayer. You do not have to participate in the prayer. Once the prayer is over, the meeting ends. After the Meeting You are free to leave if you don't want to socialize. People will socialize after meetings. Some may introduce themselves to you and may ask questions, especially if you introduced yourself as a newcomer. One member, Barb M., relates that the thing she was most relieved about was the non-imposing feel that she got when she first began attending meetings. "No one bombarded me with his or her religious slogans, no one pestered me to hold hands and pray, no one cared if I sat in the back or sat in the front, drank coffee or didn't drink coffee, helped clean up or ran off before the meeting ended." The only set rules are those of common respect which may include: Try to be on time. No smoking. No cross-talk during shares. Have court vouchers signed at the end of a meeting. The Helping Hand of AA One common practice is that when you introduce yourself to the group as a newcomer and an alcoholic, you may receive a number list with the names and numbers of people who you can call, if you feel the need to drink and need help. People who put their number in this book do so because they really do want to help. It isn't required of anyone to do so but it keeps with the tradition of AA that when alcoholic calls for help, the helping hand of AA will be there.

AA "Sunday in Sobriety" Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting

The Meeting Space

What can you expect when you attend a 12-step or Alcoholics Anonymous meeting? If you've never attended one, you likely have fears and reservations. Common Myths and Preconceptions These things you may think happen at 12-step meetings, but may by myths rather than typical occurrences. You have to stand up and say, "I am an alcoholic." You have to talk in the meeting. You have to participate in group hugs. You have to pray. You are joining a cult. How It Works What is the reality for most meetings? The meeting might be held in a building connected with a church or a community center. You arrive to find most of the people you see are there for the Alcoholics Anonymous meeting outside socializing. Inside of the room they may be setting books out for those who do not have their own or setting up the coffee station. You take a seat anywhere you feel most comfortable and as people pass by, some say hello, some nod, some stop and introduce themselves, and some keep to themselves. One or two people sit in the front of the room at a table. He/she are the meeting chairperson(s) for that particular day and will lead the meeting. They may ask you to read from an AA literature handout, but you are welcome to decline. The meeting begins with the chairperson reading the AA Preamble, then leading a group prayer, the Serenity Prayer (short version). Afterward, different members of the meeting read brief AA literature. The chairperson(s) asks if there are any newcomers, or first-timers, attending the meeting who would like to introduce themselves by their first name. It is not required to introduce yourself as a newcomer if you are not comfortable yet. Sharing Experience, Strength, and Hope Different meetings have different ways of doing things but for the most part, they run the same. During the meeting, people simply begin sharing. In some meetings, people are randomly called on. Speaker's meetings feature a person chosen to talk about their experience, strength, and hope in regards to their recovery. Each starts off by introducing themselves as, "Hello, my name is (first name) and I'm an alcoholic." Everyone responds with, "Hello (first name)!" After they complete their share everyone in the room thanks them. Then the next person can speak up. After everyone completes sharing, the chairperson asks if there are any AA-related announcements. Then they announce that it is time for the Lord's Prayer, and everyone stands in a large circle, holding hands, and recites the prayer. You do not have to participate in the prayer. Once the prayer is over, the meeting ends. After the Meeting You are free to leave if you don't want to socialize. People will socialize after meetings. Some may introduce themselves to you and may ask questions, especially if you introduced yourself as a newcomer. One member, Barb M., relates that the thing she was most relieved about was the non-imposing feel that she got when she first began attending meetings. "No one bombarded me with his or her religious slogans, no one pestered me to hold hands and pray, no one cared if I sat in the back or sat in the front, drank coffee or didn't drink coffee, helped clean up or ran off before the meeting ended." The only set rules are those of common respect which may include: Try to be on time. No smoking. No cross-talk during shares. Have court vouchers signed at the end of a meeting. The Helping Hand of AA One common practice is that when you introduce yourself to the group as a newcomer and an alcoholic, you may receive a number list with the names and numbers of people who you can call, if you feel the need to drink and need help. People who put their number in this book do so because they really do want to help. It isn't required of anyone to do so but it keeps with the tradition of AA that when alcoholic calls for help, the helping hand of AA will be there.

Yogi Bhajan`s Birthday Celebration

RYK Yoga and Meditation Center

Yogi Bhajan`s Birthday Celebration In celebration of Yogi Bhajan’s Birthday RYK Yoga and Meditation Center is very happy to cordially invite all of you to a free community event. Yogi Bhajan is the first Master to share the teachings of Kundalini Yoga in the West. His divine wisdom and inspiration live on in the enlightened legacy of the vast Library of Teachings he created to serve us now, and for countless generations to come. “Happiness is your birthright. Live it!” 2:45am – Doors open. 3:00am – Doors lock. 3:00am – “Guru Guru Wahe Guru, Guru Ram Das Guru” – simultaneous world-wide chanting 3:15am – Kundalini Yoga warm – ups 3:30am – Long Ek Ong Kar meditation (chant) – 2.5 hours 6:00am – Gong nap 7:00am – Potluck vegetarian breakfast ******** Monday, Aug 26th, 3a.m. - 8a.m., $0 RSVP here --> http://bit.ly/YogiBhajansBirthday-2019-08-26 Sign up & pay in advance and score a reserved mat! RYK Yoga and Meditation Center (702)[masked] W Sahara Ave Suite 109 Las Vegas, NV 89117

AA "Welcome Home" Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting

The Meeting Space

What can you expect when you attend a 12-step or Alcoholics Anonymous meeting? If you've never attended one, you likely have fears and reservations. Common Myths and Preconceptions These things you may think happen at 12-step meetings, but may by myths rather than typical occurrences. You have to stand up and say, "I am an alcoholic." You have to talk in the meeting. You have to participate in group hugs. You have to pray. You are joining a cult. How It Works What is the reality for most meetings? The meeting might be held in a building connected with a church or a community center. You arrive to find most of the people you see are there for the Alcoholics Anonymous meeting outside socializing. Inside of the room they may be setting books out for those who do not have their own or setting up the coffee station. You take a seat anywhere you feel most comfortable and as people pass by, some say hello, some nod, some stop and introduce themselves, and some keep to themselves. One or two people sit in the front of the room at a table. He/she are the meeting chairperson(s) for that particular day and will lead the meeting. They may ask you to read from an AA literature handout, but you are welcome to decline. The meeting begins with the chairperson reading the AA Preamble, then leading a group prayer, the Serenity Prayer (short version). Afterward, different members of the meeting read brief AA literature. The chairperson(s) asks if there are any newcomers, or first-timers, attending the meeting who would like to introduce themselves by their first name. It is not required to introduce yourself as a newcomer if you are not comfortable yet. Sharing Experience, Strength, and Hope Different meetings have different ways of doing things but for the most part, they run the same. During the meeting, people simply begin sharing. In some meetings, people are randomly called on. Speaker's meetings feature a person chosen to talk about their experience, strength, and hope in regards to their recovery. Each starts off by introducing themselves as, "Hello, my name is (first name) and I'm an alcoholic." Everyone responds with, "Hello (first name)!" After they complete their share everyone in the room thanks them. Then the next person can speak up. After everyone completes sharing, the chairperson asks if there are any AA-related announcements. Then they announce that it is time for the Lord's Prayer, and everyone stands in a large circle, holding hands, and recites the prayer. You do not have to participate in the prayer. Once the prayer is over, the meeting ends. After the Meeting You are free to leave if you don't want to socialize. People will socialize after meetings. Some may introduce themselves to you and may ask questions, especially if you introduced yourself as a newcomer. One member, Barb M., relates that the thing she was most relieved about was the non-imposing feel that she got when she first began attending meetings. "No one bombarded me with his or her religious slogans, no one pestered me to hold hands and pray, no one cared if I sat in the back or sat in the front, drank coffee or didn't drink coffee, helped clean up or ran off before the meeting ended." The only set rules are those of common respect which may include: Try to be on time. No smoking. No cross-talk during shares. Have court vouchers signed at the end of a meeting. The Helping Hand of AA One common practice is that when you introduce yourself to the group as a newcomer and an alcoholic, you may receive a number list with the names and numbers of people who you can call, if you feel the need to drink and need help. People who put their number in this book do so because they really do want to help. It isn't required of anyone to do so but it keeps with the tradition of AA that when alcoholic calls for help, the helping hand of AA will be there.

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