What we're about

Crime and Punishment, Anna Karenina, A Tale of Two Cities......this group is for anyone who wants to re-visit classics such as these or explore them for the first time. This group will also read some more contemporary fiction classics, books by living authors whose reputations for writing first class fiction are already very well established. This is a casual book club and anyone with an interest in classic fiction is welcome! This group will not be a formal affair with prepared questions, etc. Instead, we will have a free-flowing discussion about the selection over food and libations (if you so desire).

Upcoming events (2)

June Meetup: Maurice by E.M. Forster

Online event

Please join us in June when we discuss “Maurice” by E.M. Forster. Location: ZOOM We are now meeting once a month, usual last Tuesday of the month, online via Zoom until the threat from the COVID-19 pandemic ceases. The Zoom information necessary to join the meeting on Zoom will be sent out as a message emailed to the folks signed up for the meeting. For security reasons, this notice will be sent out on the Sunday two days prior to the meeting. The discussion will start at the normal 6:30 PM time. Please sign in 5 minutes early so that we are all ready to start promptly on time. If you have not used Zoom before, I suggest you download it sometime before the meeting starts. From Christopher Lehmann-Haupt, The New York Times "A wonderful novel to read – rich in its subtle intelligence, beautifully controlled in its development, deeply moving – in short, the work of an exceptional artist working close to the peak of his creative powers." From the back cover of the Norton edition: Set in the elegant Edwardian world of Cambridge undergraduate life, this story by a master novelist introduces us to Maurice Hall when he is fourteen. We follow him through public school and Cambridge, and into his father's firm. In a highly structured society, Maurice is a conventional young man in almost every way―except that he is homosexual. Written during 1913 and 1914, immediately after Howards End, and not published until 1971, Maurice was ahead of its time in its theme and in its affirmation that love between men can be happy. "Happiness," Forster wrote, "is its keynote.... In Maurice I tried to create a character who was completely unlike myself or what I supposed myself to be: someone handsome, healthy, bodily attractive, mentally torpid, not a bad businessman and rather a snob. Into this mixture I dropped an ingredient that puzzles him, wakes him up, torments him and finally saves him."

July Meetup: The Heart is a Lonely Hunter by Carson McCullers

Please join us in July when we discuss “The Heart is a Lonely Hunter” by Carson McCullers Please excuse the book selection substitution for the month of July. “Emma” was the original selection. However, because of its length, we will be discussing that Jane Austen book in January 2021. Location: ZOOM We are now meeting once a month, usual last Tuesday of the month, online via Zoom until the threat from the COVID-19 pandemic ceases. The Zoom information necessary to join the meeting on Zoom will be sent out as a message emailed to the folks signed up for the meeting. For security reasons, this notice will be sent out on the Sunday two days prior to the meeting. The discussion will start at the normal 6:30 PM time. Please sign in 5 minutes early so that we are all ready to start promptly on time. If you have not used Zoom before, I suggest you download it sometime before the meeting starts. Review in Goodreads: “With the publication of her first novel, The Heart is a Lonely Hunter, Carson McCullers, all of twenty-three, became a literary sensation. With its profound sense of moral isolation and its compassionate glimpses into its characters' inner lives, the novel is considered McCullers' finest work, an enduring masterpiece first published by Houghton Mifflin in 1940. At its center is the deaf-mute John Singer, who becomes the confidant for various types of misfits in a Georgia mill town during the 1930s. Each one yearns for escape from small town life. When Singer's mute companion goes insane, Singer moves into the Kelly house, where Mick Kelly, the book's heroine (and loosely based on McCullers), finds solace in her music. Wonderfully attuned to the spiritual isolation that underlies the human condition, and with a deft sense for racial tensions in the South, McCullers spins a haunting, unforgettable story that gives voice to the rejected, the forgotten, and the mistreated--and, through Mick Kelly, gives voice to the quiet, intensely personal search for beauty. Richard Wright praised Carson McCullers for her ability "to rise above the pressures of her environment and embrace white and black humanity in one sweep of apprehension and tenderness." She writes "with a sweep and certainty that are overwhelming," said the New York Times. McCullers became an overnight literary sensation, but her novel has endured, just as timely and powerful today as when it was first published. The Heart is a Lonely Hunter is Carson McCullers at her most compassionate, endearing best.”

Past events (133)

May Meetup: Chess Story by Stefan Zweig

Online event

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