What we're about

www.BASONOVA.org
BASONOVA WEBSITE

BASONOVA is a non-sectarian society open to anyone who has an interest in biblical-era archaeology or the history of ancient times.  During Covid we met exclusively by Zoom. We are now returning to meeting in-person at a variety of local Northern Virginia ethnic restaurants. Sharing group tables, we break bread with interesting people from all walks of life. We call ourselves a society because there is an important social aspect to our organization, which recently began its third decade.

Join us to listen to well-informed scholars and field archaeologists. Many of these lecturers have international reputations and educate us for an hour with richly illustrated images of their work.

Since the pandemic, we temporarily joined with our sister group in Maryland, BAF, to host a long season of twice-monthly virtual Zoom lectures. BASONOVA began in 1994 as an unofficial offshoot of Hershel Shanks' Biblical Archaeology Society and has grown to become a popular destination to meet a wide range of warm and thoughtful people interested in the biblical history and archaeology of ancient times.

Membership form at: www.basonova.org

LOOK FORWARD TO SEEING YOU. BE SAFE!
~Susan
Board Member

Upcoming events (3)

Discoveries At Nefertiti's Sun Temple

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LUNCH & LECTURE

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Proof of vaccination is required.

SPEAKER: Jacquelyn Williamson, Assistant Professor of Art and Archaeology of the Ancient Mediterranean World at George Mason University

This event is sponsored by the DC chapter of ARCE (American Research Center in Egypt).

Stone relief fragments were recently excavated from Kom el-Nana at Tell el-Amarna in Egypt, the site of Nefertiti’s Sun Temple. They date to approximately 1350 B.C.E., the period when Pharaoh Akhenaten closed Egyptian temples and dismissed the priesthood, declared the sun deity Aten as the true God, and with his wife Nefertiti established a new capital of Egypt at Amarna.

In an illustrated presentation, Jacquelyn Williamson reconstructs the architecture, art, and inscriptions from the site to demonstrate Kom el-Nana is the location of Queen Nefertiti’s ‘Sunshade of Re’ Temple as well as another more enigmatic structure there that served the funerary needs of the non-royal courtiers at the ancient city.

The art and inscriptions provide new information about Queen Nefertiti and challenge assumptions about her role in Pharaoh Akhenaten’s religious movement dedicated to the sun god Aten.

20,000 Leagues Under The Wine-Dark Sea

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LOCATION IN-PERSON @ LOCAL RESTAURANT. INFORMATION COMING SOON

SPEAKER: Emily Egan, University of Maryland

This presentation takes a deep “dive” into depictions of marine life in the art of Late Bronze Age Greece (ca. 1600–1100 BCE). Amid a survey of sea creatures including octopods, dolphins, and fish, special attention is given to the enigmatic argonaut motif and its appearance in the wall paintings of the Mycenaean ‘Palace of Nestor’ at Pylos.
New research at the Palace of Nestor suggests that argonauts were not simple ornaments, but powerful royal symbols, on par with more fearsome Aegean “totems” like lions and griffins. This lecture interrogates this new theory and the evidence that underpins it, and also demonstrates how the painted forms of the creatures, when viewed closely, offer rare insight into the thought processes and working methods of Greek Bronze Age artists.

Strong Inscriptional Confirmations of People in the Hebrew Bible

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You will receive a Zoom link after paying at WWW.BASONOVA.ORG

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SPEAKER:
Lawrence Mykytiuk, Purdue University

How many people named in just the Five Books of Moses have been confirmed by historians?

Bible-era inscriptions confirm the historical reality of more than 55 persons in the entire twenty-four book Hebrew Bible (Tanach). Most of these inscriptions are from the lifetime of the people in the Bible.

Of 43 Hebrew monarchs in the Hebrew Bible, 16 have been confirmed: 45% of the kings of the northern kingdom of Israel and 30% of the kings of Judah. These confirmations are about 3/8 of the Bible’s Hebrew monarchs. Also confirmed have been 25 of approximately 160 Gentile monarchs in the Hebrew Bible, or about 15%.

Finally, more than 14 royal officials, priests, and others have been confirmed as recorded in inscriptions; several more await publication. These persons are Hebrew, Assyrian, and Babylonian, plus Persian-empire governors who might not have been Persian. Examples illustrate the two ways researchers identify a biblical person in an inscription.

Past events (100)

Archaeology and the Utopian Temple of Ezekiel

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Photos (65)