Past Meetup

Dominican Independence Day Dinner

This Meetup is past

13 people went

Location image of event venue

Details

Boston Dominican Professionals cordially invite you to our Dominican Independence Day Dinner to commemorate the 169th Anniversary of the Dominican Independence!

Although we will miss the carnival back in the island, we’ll celebrate with great Dominican food to bring back some good memories. We have made reservations at Merengue Restaurant, one of the most famous Dominican restaurants in the Greater Boston area.

Please plan to be there by 6:45pm, we’ll be seated at 7pm.

Since I know that for some of you getting to Merengue Restaurant will be a difficult task given that there is no T station close by, I plan on picking people up from the Roxbury Crossing T Station at 6:20pm. Please let me know if you need a ride by noon on Wednesday (Feb. 27th) so I can plan accordingly.

We are expecting a big group, I recommend bringing some cash to speed up the payment process at the end of the dinner.

Below is the link to the menu for your convenience.

http://themergepoint.com/files/Catering_Menu.pdf

Friends of friends are welcome!!! Please invite others, the more the merrier!!!

“Another culture is experienced upon entering the Merengue Restaurant. Decorated with paintings by

Dominican artists, and aromas of Caribbean spices all come together to create a small piece of the tropical nation. Owner Hector Piña, who first arrived from the Dominican Republic in 1986, says that he seeks to create a “grandma’s home” atmosphere.

He and his wife and co-owner Nivia want food at Merengue to resemble meals cooked by mothers and grandmothers in the tropics, with plaintains, yucca, rice and beans, tangy sauces, and lots of fish.

Proudly the couple attests to visits that such distinguished Dominicans as president Leonel Fernandez and slugger David Ortiz make on and off to the eatery.

Dominican cuisine is rooted in a mix of various cultures, including Spanish, Aztec (brought to the island by the Spanish from Mexico), African, and Mediterranean. The immigrants who first arrived to the island migrated with their own kitchen recipes and adapted foods and ingredients to resemble their cooking styles and tastes, according to Piña.” - DominicanToday.com