What we're about

Brighton Café Scientifique is Science for the Sociable!

Informal talks of about 30-45 minutes are given by experts in the field, at a level accessible to all.  After a break, the talk is followed by a question and answer session, and open discussion on the topic of the evening.
We meet on the second Wednesday of the month, at 7:30 for 8:00pm start at the Latest Music Bar, Manchester St, Brighton BN2 1TF.  Meetings are free, although a collection is taken to contribute to the running expenses of the organisation.
Our dates for 2023: Wed 11 Jan, Tues 8 Feb, Wed 8 Mar, Wed 12 Apr, ...

Brighton Café Sci is part of the international Café Scientifique movement.

Please note: there are no regular meetings in August. Occasionally we may arrange meetings on days other than the second Wednesday of the month.

Upcoming events (2)

Greenhouse gas emissions from homes: what can we do? with Michael de Podesta

Greenhouse gas emissions from homes: what can we do? with Michael de Podesta on Wednesday 12th October

The need to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide is urgent: at current rates of emission, we are 14 years away from committing to 1.5 °C of global temperature rise.
In the UK, roughly a third of greenhouse gas emissions are associated with keeping our homes warm, but technologies exist which can reduce these emissions overnight by at least 80%.
In this talk I will outline the problem, and then run through some of the solutions we have to hand. Be sure to come with questions in mind!

Dr Michael de Podesta is a physicist who recently retired from the National Physical Laboratory. His blog is at Protons for Breakfast. Come along and find out how he is getting on with cutting his own domestic CO2 emissions.
Doors open 7:15pm, talk starts 8:00pm.

Neutrinos: elusive particles that pack a punch, with Prof Simon Peeters

Neutrinos: elusive particles that pack a punch, with Prof Simon Peeters on Wednesday 9th November

Particles make up the stuff all around us. What we don't directly see is that we are immersed in a sea of neutrinos, the elusive sibling of the electron. These neutrinos have very strange properties. For example, they change their identity while they move around and hardly have any mass. The more we study them using increasingly ingenious experiments, the more we believe that they have shaped our Universe. So we are developing even more advanced experiments to find out as much as we can.

Prof Simon Peeters of the University of Sussex is currently a leading member of the DUNE experiment. DUNE is a large international experiment to study neutrinos that is being constructed in USA. Simon has worked over the past 20 years trying to learn as much as possible about neutrinos, building and using experiments in Canada, France, and Japan.

At the Latest Music Bar; doors open 7:15, talk starts 8:00pm. Please note that we do not charge for these events but we do ask those attending to make a contribution to our expenses, if they feel able to.

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