What we're about

We are an amateur archaeological society based in the Brighton and Hove area, in the county of Sussex in England (inaugurated in 1906).
Our objectives are promote the study of archaeology and local history and to ensure the proper recording and preservation of local antiquities and relics
What do we do ?
During the Winter months we have a varied lecture programme on a wide range of archaeological topics and in addition our associated Local History Group also runs a lecture programme.
During the Summer we organize excursions for our members to some of the more unusual or hard to find historical sites in the South.
To cater for the "hands on" archaeologists among us the society has a very active Field Unit. Apart from "digging" our own site, we assist other groups and professional archaeologists during the season.
Find out more at www.brightonarch.org.uk

Upcoming events (4)

Waterlogged Preservation (Mary Rose)

Unitarian Church

Saved by the Waves: Waterlogged Preservation This lecture looks at a comparison between a well-known time capsule site and one newly discovered. Through the many perishable artefacts of sites such as the Mary Rose and Must Farm see how organic survival can revolutionise our understanding of the past and construct a vivid picture of a single moment in time. Speaker - Amie Friend Free to BHAS Members, £4 to Non-Members

Brighton before the Pavilion: a different aspect of the city history

Central United Reformed Church, 102 Blatchington Road, Hove BN3 3YF

Brighton before the Pavilion: a different aspect of the city history A talk by Geoffrey Mead on the history of Brighton before George IV built his pleasure palace. Speaker - Geoffrey Mead Talk is free to Members, Non-members £4.

Early Routeways on the Weald and Downland of South East England

Early Routeways on the Weald and Downland of South East England. Evidence for prehistoric trackways including holloways will be reviewed beginning with some pioneering work by the Curwen's in the Brighton Area. Evidence will be outlined that some routes are at least of Iron Age date and in places there are hints of Neolithic and Bronze Age origins. It is argued that some of the droveways, which link the coastal plain, Downs and Weald, and which have been considered of Anglo-Saxon origin, may originate in prehistory and this is part of a growing picture of prehistoric activity in the Weald. The South Downs Way, a ridgeway which now forms the spine of the National Park, has surprisingly little evidence for prehistoric origins and it is argued that there is stronger evidence for early routeways at right angles to the axis of the downs and other geological ridges. Skeaker - Martin Bell Free to BHAS Members, £4 to Non-Members

Eugenius Birch: The King of Piers

Central United Reformed Church, 102 Blatchington Road, Hove BN3 3YF

Eugenius Birch: The King of Piers A talk on the Victorian Engineer Eugenius Birch who built many piers in the 19th Century including West Pier Brighton as well as the first pier made of iron and the first pier to have an integral entertainment pavilion Speaker - Kathryn Ferry Talk is free to Members, Non-members £4.

Past events (40)

The History of Brighton Fishing

Central United Reformed Church, 102 Blatchington Road, Hove BN3 3YF

Photos (3)