What we're about

Open, informal group for the appreciation of nature and wildflowers. Also for birders, butterfly lovers, and folks concerned about declining numbers of bees. We'll take field-trips to see wildflowers in nature, in gardens, and in nurseries. In winter, we'll meet for coffee or cocktails.

Upcoming events (2)

Foraging for Wild Edibles: Hickory Nuts - online, not in-person!

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, our scheduled gathering has been canceled. However, I am inviting you to alternatively join me for a virtual walk – not in person as originally scheduled. This online event is the fifth of six in a series of virtual walks that will focus on Foraging for Wild Edibles. Why forage? Foraging feeds us – literally and figuratively. Foraging helps to fill our freezer and pantry without us planting seeds or spending dollars. Foraging helps us to better understand the earth and more about our sense of place on it. Foraging anchors us in the season – it helps us to be mindful of the now. Even though they grow on trees, hickory nuts technically aren’t tree nuts. They’re drupes, egg-shaped fruits with a fleshy layer surrounding their hard-shelled seeds. In other words, the nutmeats are actually the seeds of a hickory. This virtual walk will feature (1) Pignut Hickory (Carya glabra) and (2) Shagbark Hickory (Carya ovata) whose ripened nuts can be found at this time at the 41-acre unnamed property owned by the Town of Clifton Park. The online session will last <45 minutes, including an interactive discussion period immediately following the information-packed ~15-minute presentation. If you have an interest in foraging for wild edibles, please join me for all six episodes of this series of “walks.” The next session is the finale of this series, which has featured different plants and information about edible plant parts, including leaves, roots, stems and fruits (both fleshy and nuts). For each online session, please be prompt and please understand that no more than 100 of us may participate. Join this Zoom meeting: https://us04web.zoom.us/j/75058624526 Meeting ID:[masked] Password: 4ZSQxY “See” you then! Please logon to this presentation to learn more about these easy to find and identify and tasty wild nuts that you can use to make delicious cookies, cakes, brittle, and ice cream, but also in a broth for savory dishes!

Foraging for Wild Edibles: 'Autumnberries' - online, not in-person!

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, our scheduled gathering has been canceled. However, I am inviting you to alternatively join me for a virtual walk – not in person as originally scheduled. This is the finale of a six-part series of online events about Foraging for Wild Edibles. Why forage? Foraging feeds us – literally and figuratively. Foraging helps to fill our freezer and pantry without us planting seeds or spending dollars. Foraging helps us to better understand the earth and more about our sense of place on it. Foraging anchors us in the season – it helps us to be mindful of the now. When mature, these red berries contain carotenoids (which give color to plant parts like ripe tomatoes and autumn leaves), including considerable amounts of lycopene (which is an antioxidant known to have multiple health benefits). This virtual walk will feature Autumn-olive (Elaeagnus umbellata) whose ripened fruit can be found at this time along the Historic Champlain Canalway Trail in the Town of Halfmoon. The online session will last <45 minutes, including an interactive discussion period immediately following the information-packed ~15-minute presentation. If you have an interest in foraging for wild edibles, please join me for this sixth and final episode of this series of “walks.” In sum, the series has featured different plants and, over its course, provided information about edible plant parts, including leaves, roots, stems and fruits (both fleshy and nuts). For this online session, please be prompt and please understand that no more than 100 of us may participate. Join this Zoom meeting: https://us04web.zoom.us/j/71723723871 Meeting ID:[masked] Password: 3e8aPx “See” you then! Please logon to this presentation to learn more about this easy to find and identify and tasty wild edible fruit that you can use to make delicious jam, fruit leather, sauces, and baked goods, or even in a cocktail or as wine!

Past events (190)

Fall Colors…from a Different Perspective

Online event

Photos (162)