What we're about

The Cardiff Book Collective meet on the last Tuesday of every month for a couple of sociable hours of drinks and literary conversation, in a cosy atmosphere hosted at The Little Man Coffee Co. We’ll be discussing the book we’ve all been reading, amongst other things. We only read fiction but apart from that try not to limit ourselves and are always excited to read something new! The Cardiff Book Collective is all about kicking back and finding a little headspace amongst like-minded folk.

We are now working with Heady Mix, a subscription book box that shares our values.

Heady Mix is a new subscription book box showcasing fiction about and by underrepresented groups covering women, race, disabilities, LGBTQI+ and more. Our book box collections will change how you see the world as they are carefully curated so you can absorb diverse experiences, alternative lives and different cultures.

As part of your membership, you'll also be invited to exclusive member events and you'll have access to our discovery platform where you can engage with varied viewpoints via author interviews and a whole range of new content including articles, podcasts, videos and the Heady Mix online community.

Heady Mix book boxes are delivered to your doorstep every two months and feature two novels and an anthology of stories and/or essays.

www.headymix.co.uk

Upcoming events (2)

IN PERSON - Mother for Dinner

Needs a location

In May we are reading Mother for Dinner by Shalom Auslander.

By the author of Foreskin's Lament, a novel of identity, tribalism, and mothers.
Seventh Seltzer has done everything he can to break from the past, but in his overbearing, narcissistic mother's last moments he is drawn back into the life he left behind. At her deathbed, she whispers in his ear the two words he always knew she would: Eat me.
This is not unusual, as the Seltzers are Cannibal-Americans, a once proud and thriving ethnic group, but for Seventh, it raises some serious questions, both practical and emotional. Of practical concern, his dead mother is six-foot-two and weighs about four hundred and fifty pounds. Even divided up between Seventh and his eleven brothers, that's a lot of red meat. Plus Second keeps kosher, Ninth is vegan, First hated her, and Sixth is dead. To make matters worse, even if he can wrangle his brothers together for a feast, the Can-Am people have assimilated, and the only living Cannibal who knows how to perform the ancient ritual is their Uncle Ishmael, whose erratic understanding of their traditions leads to conflict.
Seventh struggles with his mother's deathbed request. He never loved her, but the sense of guilt and responsibility he feels--to her and to his people and to his unique cultural heritage--is overwhelming. His mother always taught him he was a link in a chain, thousands of people long, stretching back hundreds of years. But, as his brother First says, he's getting tired of chains.
Irreverent and written with Auslander's incomparable humor, Mother for Dinner is an exploration of legacy, assimilation, the things we owe our families, and the things we owe ourselves.

Please bring £1, new readers always welcome!

ONLINE - Mother for Dinner

Needs a location

In May we are reading Mother for Dinner by Shalom Auslander.

By the author of Foreskin's Lament, a novel of identity, tribalism, and mothers.
Seventh Seltzer has done everything he can to break from the past, but in his overbearing, narcissistic mother's last moments he is drawn back into the life he left behind. At her deathbed, she whispers in his ear the two words he always knew she would: Eat me.
This is not unusual, as the Seltzers are Cannibal-Americans, a once proud and thriving ethnic group, but for Seventh, it raises some serious questions, both practical and emotional. Of practical concern, his dead mother is six-foot-two and weighs about four hundred and fifty pounds. Even divided up between Seventh and his eleven brothers, that's a lot of red meat. Plus Second keeps kosher, Ninth is vegan, First hated her, and Sixth is dead. To make matters worse, even if he can wrangle his brothers together for a feast, the Can-Am people have assimilated, and the only living Cannibal who knows how to perform the ancient ritual is their Uncle Ishmael, whose erratic understanding of their traditions leads to conflict.
Seventh struggles with his mother's deathbed request. He never loved her, but the sense of guilt and responsibility he feels--to her and to his people and to his unique cultural heritage--is overwhelming. His mother always taught him he was a link in a chain, thousands of people long, stretching back hundreds of years. But, as his brother First says, he's getting tired of chains.
Irreverent and written with Auslander's incomparable humor, Mother for Dinner is an exploration of legacy, assimilation, the things we owe our families, and the things we owe ourselves.

Please bring £1, new readers always welcome!

Past events (82)

IN PERSON - Piranesi

Needs a location

Photos (1)