What we're about

Greater Cincinnati book club for lesbian, gay, bi, and trans people. We read a variety of genres, not limited to LGBT-themes, and meet once a month to discuss a book and socialize.

Our book club started in August, 2013, as a way to meet other LGBT people in the Cincinnati area for socializing and friendship, and of course reading and discussing books. As a group we read one book a month and then get together to talk about it. Usually we hold the book club meetings at members' homes, on a rotating but voluntary basis. Currently we meet on the 2nd Thursday of the month at 7pm. Members suggest books to read and we select upcoming books as a group. We read a variety of genres, primarily fiction with the occasional non-fiction book or memoir if we agree on a topic or person. We're not limited to LGBT authors or themes. Generally the person who suggested the book will lead the discussion at the meeting.

The group is open to new members. The group becomes stronger as people attend regularly. We so far have not had to set a limit for the group. If the regular attendance grows, a limit may have to be set. But there is no pressure to attend every meeting. We welcome newcomers!

We do ask that members be responsible for showing up to the event they RSVP'd for, but we also realize life happens and things happen at the last minute. If a member has 2 no shows, they will be removed from the group. A no show is defined as someone who has RSVP'd "yes” but does not change their RSVP, does not show up, and does not provide any explanation or respond as to why they did not show.

A member may also be removed at the discretion of the Organizer, things that might cause removal, but are not limited to, are being a no show, being rude, or harassing another member(s).

If you've got any questions about our group, feel free to drop me a note! -- Joe

Upcoming events (5+)

Discuss Southernmost by Silas House

Downtown Cincinnati

“A novel for our time, a courageous and necessary book.” —Jennifer Haigh, author of Heat and Light In this stunning novel about judgment, courage, heartbreak, and change, author Silas House wrestles with the limits of belief and the infinite ways to love. In the aftermath of a flood that washes away much of a small Tennessee town, evangelical preacher Asher Sharp offers shelter to two gay men. In doing so, he starts to see his life anew—and risks losing everything: his wife, locked into her religious prejudices; his congregation, which shuns Asher after he delivers a passionate sermon in defense of tolerance; and his young son, Justin, caught in the middle of what turns into a bitter custody battle. With no way out but ahead, Asher takes Justin and flees to Key West, where he hopes to find his brother, Luke, whom he’d turned against years ago after Luke came out. And it is there, at the southernmost point of the country, that Asher and Justin discover a new way of thinking about the world, and a new way of understanding love. Southernmost is a tender and affecting book, a meditation on love and its consequences.

Discuss There, There by Tommy Orange

Clifton area

ONE OF THE 10 BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR — THE NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW WINNER OF THE CENTER FOR FICTION FIRST NOVEL PRIZE One of the Best Books of the Year: The Washington Post, NPR, Time, O, The Oprah Magazine, San Francisco Chronicle, Entertainment Weekly, The Boston Globe, GQ, The Dallas Morning News, Buzzfeed, BookPage, Publishers Weekly, Library Journal, Kirkus Reviews Tommy Orange’s “groundbreaking, extraordinary” (The New York Times) There There is the “brilliant, propulsive” (People Magazine) story of twelve unforgettable characters, Urban Indians living in Oakland, California, who converge and collide on one fateful day. It’s “the year’s most galvanizing debut novel” (Entertainment Weekly). As we learn the reasons that each person is attending the Big Oakland Powwow—some generous, some fearful, some joyful, some violent—momentum builds toward a shocking yet inevitable conclusion that changes everything. Jacquie Red Feather is newly sober and trying to make it back to the family she left behind in shame. Dene Oxendene is pulling his life back together after his uncle’s death and has come to work at the powwow to honor his uncle’s memory. Opal Viola Victoria Bear Shield has come to watch her nephew Orvil, who has taught himself traditional Indian dance through YouTube videos and will to perform in public for the very first time. There will be glorious communion, and a spectacle of sacred tradition and pageantry. And there will be sacrifice, and heroism, and loss. There There is a wondrous and shattering portrait of an America few of us have ever seen. It’s “masterful . . . white-hot . . . devastating” (The Washington Post) at the same time as it is fierce, funny, suspenseful, thoroughly modern, and impossible to put down. Here is a voice we have never heard—a voice full of poetry and rage, exploding onto the page with urgency and force. Tommy Orange has written a stunning novel that grapples with a complex and painful history, with an inheritance of beauty and profound spirituality, and with a plague of addiction, abuse, and suicide. This is the book that everyone is talking about right now, and it’s destined to be a classic.

Discuss The Darkest Child by Delores Phillips

“Evil’s regenerative powers and one girl’s fierce resistance. . . . A book that deserves a wide audience.”—The Cleveland Plain Dealer “Filled with grand plot events and clearly identifiable villains and victims . . . lush with detail and captivating with its story of racial tension and family violence.”—The Washington Post Book World “[An] exceptional debut novel. . . . [Has] a depth and dimension not often characteristic of a first novel.”—Library Journal (starred) “Phillips writes with a no-nonsense elegance. . . . As a vision of African-American life, The Darkest Child is one of the harshest novels to arrive in many years. . . . [Phillips] buttresses those harsh episodes with a depth of characterization worthy of Chekhov, pitch-perfect dialogue, and a profound knowledge of the segregated South in the ’50s.”—The New Leader

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Past events (50)

Discuss The Hummingbird's Daughter by Luis Alberto Urea

North College Hill

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