What we're about

This group organises walks that are fun and sociable. It is the "sister" meetup of Countryside Hiking (which has over 3,000 members). The hikes for this group are focused more on longer distances and at a faster pace.

The hikes will be between 8-20 miles and will incorporate time to view the scenery, network with fellow walkers and spend time at a pub during the day. The walk will be at the core of the "event", but socialising and seeing new things will be equally important. I look forward to seeing you at a future meetup

By booking on to a Countryside Hiking (8-20 Miles Hiking meetup you accept that you are participating in any activities of your own accord, entirely at your own risk & expressly accept that neither Surrey & Countryside Hiking meetup (which includes its organisers) have any responsibility or liability for loss or injury. Furthermore, you agree that Surrey & Countryside Hiking meetup bears no responsibility for the accuracy of information regarding public transport costs, times and conditions of carriage or statistical, technical or safety specifications regarding equipment, facilities, timings or costing either on its own or others websites or documentation. Though Countryside Hiking (8-20) will endeavour to offer what it believes to be accurate information at the time of publication for any meetup, you agree that it is ultimately the responsibility of each participant or spectator to satisfy themselves of any accuracy of information direct with third party facilities, enabling companies or persons. Your booking, payment, actual or intended participation also indicates your agreement that Countryside Hiking (8-20) Hiking meetup organisers reserve the right to change at any time & without prior or written notice the start, finish, duration, location, terms for any meetup or transportation it provides wherever the event organiser deems it, without a necessity to make refunds for doing so. It is your responsibility to inform the event organiser about any relevant health condition & to ensure you’re personally satisfied with any agreed actions relating to it. We recommend you take out appropriate insurance for any activities/travel that you engage in. Thanks for reading this. And now come and enjoy the walk with us.

Upcoming events (5+)

THE MOUNTAINS & WATERFALLS OF WALES - WEEK END HIKE

Cardiff Castle Green

SATURDAY THE WATERFALLS HIKE (10-11 miles) We begin with what can only be described as a sublime hike, a circuit of up to ten waterfalls in the most renowned waterfall area of the UK. We'll also have the opportunity to walk behind one! Highlights: “Snow falls” – walk behind a waterfall and come out the other side – must be tried once in a lifetime! Caves Waterfall Visitor Centre SUNDAY BLAEN Y GLYN “hanging valley” Ridgeline walk (9 miles) A walk around this glacial valley, which has many special geological characteristics and lots to discover. There is a challenging ascent at the beginning, but once you are up you stay up - true skyline walking. One of the most varied and interesting walks in the Beacons, which packs in loads for its’ relatively short distance Highlights: Witness a typical U-shaped glacial valley Canadian bomber plane crash site and memorial Section of lovely waterfalls, including possible swim spot for the very brave Visit the largest burial cairn in the Beacons Meetup fee: £195 (For payment before Jan 31st 2019) £225 (For payment after Jan 31st 2019) Includes: (a) 2 nights accommodation in a 4 Star hotel in Cardiff City Centre (Twin share) (b) 2 Breakfasts (c) Services of a guide for 2 days (Fully qualified Mountain leader trained, with over 15 years experience hiking throughout Wales) (d) Travel to and from the hotel every day to the location Not included: Travel to Cardiff Other food / drink (Saturday morning we'll stop at a local supermarket to pick up lunch provisions & Sunday will be a pub lunch)

Ockley to Leith Hill Circular

The Parrot

£5.00

OCKLEY TO LEITH HILL CIRCULAR An ascent of Leith Hill from the steeper south side. This excursion to the South East’s highest spot is a delightful stroll on green meadows past historic cottages with some well-made steps to assist you at the end of the ascent. Coming back, it calls in at the famous rhododendron wood and at the end of the hike finds a perfect location for a lunch break at the Parrot Inn Highlights: See some amazing Victorian cottages and other local manors Panoramic views from the top of Leith hill Cross ponds, meadows and streams across idyllic English countryside Distance:[masked] miles Start point: The Parrot Inn, Horsham Road, Forest green, Surrey RH5 5RZ Saturday March 9th Start time: 11.00 am End time: 14.15 pm (approx) LUNCH (Pub will need to be booked in advance as it is always busy) The Parrot Inn, about 300 years old, is now a notable gastropub. The pub has a number of real ales poured direct from casks on the counter. The restaurant is eclectic with a modern touch and it uses home-grown produce in its dishes Meetup fee: £5 History of area Leith Hill is the highest point in the south-east corner of England at 294m = 965 feet. The tower was built in 1766 as a dwelling by Richard Hull of Leith Hill Place, who is buried under the tower. It was measured so as to raise the height to the symbolic 1000 feet. It later fell into disuse until 1864 when the side-tower staircase was built and it was fully restored by the National Trust in 1984. Ockley is believed to be the same as Aclea, the site of the defeat of the Danes by the Saxon Ethelwulf in a great battle in 851, as recorded in the Saxon chronicle. William Camden puts it thus (In English verse form those times): “Aethelwolph the sonne of Egbert, who having beene professed in the holy orders and released by the Popes authority, when hee had possession of his fathers kingdome by right of inheritance, joined battaile with the Danes, fought with good successe, and slew all the valiantest men among them.” It lies either side on Stane Street, the long straight Roman road to Noviomagus Reginorum (Chichester).

Two castles, Swanbourne Lake and delightful thatched houses -Arundel to Amberley

Two castles, Swanbourne Lake and delightful thatched houses make this Arundel to Amberley walk a truly fairy tale like experience. Length: 18.8km (11.7 miles), 5 hours 30 minutes. For the whole outing, including trains, sights and meals, allow at least 10 hours Start and End: London Victoria, by the ticket counter, opossite to the platform 13. Time: 09:00am at the station. Please note that we will be taking 9:20am train from East Croydon, so we will wait at the meeting point until 9:10am. At 9:23m sharp we will make our way to the platform, so please make sure that you arrive on time as we will not be waiting for the latecomers. We will arrive in Arundel at 11.02am. It is very difficult to predict exact return time as it depends on the walking speed of the particular group and the choices we make along the way (lunch, route etc). If you decide to join, please consider yourself committed for the day. Fee: £7 for a guided hike +PayPal fee Toughness: 7 out of 10. Lunch: We should get to Burpham for around 13:30, halfway through the walk. The table has not been booked as it is a very long walk and the pubs in the village start getting extremely busy at this time of the year. The service for over 30 people would simply take too long and we wouldn't be able to get to Amberley before it gets dark. So please make sure you bring packed lunches. We will stop for lunch here for one hour., but to stay on track we will have to leave at 14:00. So if we are walking slower then average the time for lunch may be shorter. More about the walk: The walk starts and ends along the River Arun. It goes up Arundel’s old High Street, lined with ancient buildings, to the Duke of Norfolk’s castle. The Norfolk family have been Roman Catholics for centuries, hence you pass the only church in the UK that is part Catholic and part Protestant (the Catholic part is their chapel, separated off by an iron grille). You pass the Roman Catholic Cathedral then enter the 1,240-acre Arundel Park (the park is closed on March 24th each year, but the public footpaths should remain open on that day). From the Hiorne Tower, you descend to Swanbourne Lake, then go up and through the Park to exit it through a gap in the wall, to walk above the River Arun again. The route leads you to the isolated hamlet of South Stoke, with its unusual church and from there you walk beside the river all the way to the village of Burpham, with its church, and pub – your lunchtime stop. The afternoon’s walk, up, over and down the chalky South Downs, makes for a nice contrast to the morning’s walk. Amberley is a delightful village with many thatched houses, a pub, tea shop and village store, in addition to its castle and church. Next to the railway station is the Amberley Museum and Heritage Centre. Please note that we will not be entering the castle grounds. History: Arundel Castle was built at the end of the eleventh century by Roger de Montgomery, Earl of Arundel. The castle was damaged in the Civil War (changing hands twice) and was largely rebuilt in ‘idealised Norman’ style by Dukes of Norfolk in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Contact: If you have any doubts, queries or would like to chat to anyone about the best options for you, please contact us via email on [masked] or phone:[masked] . Click here to follow us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/CuriousKatsAdventureClub/ Click here to receive our monthly newsletter: https://www.katsadventures.com/

Two castles, Swanbourne Lake and delightful thatched houses -Arundel to Amberley

Two castles, Swanbourne Lake and delightful thatched houses make this Arundel to Amberley walk a truly fairy tale like experience. Length: 18.8km (11.7 miles), 5 hours 30 minutes. For the whole outing, including trains, sights and meals, allow at least 10 hours Start and End: London Victoria, by the ticket counter, opossite to the platform 13. Time: 09:00am At 9:23m sharp we will make our way to the platform, so please make sure that you arrive on time as we will not be waiting for the latecomers. We will arrive in Arundel at 11.02am. It is very difficult to predict exact return time as it depends on the walking speed of the particular group and the choices we make along the way (lunch, route etc). If you decide to join, please consider yourself committed for the day. Fee: £7 for a guided hike +PayPal fee Toughness: 7 out of 10. Lunch: We should get to Burpham for around 13:30, halfway through the walk. The table has not been booked as it is a very long walk and the pubs in the village start getting extremely busy at this time of the year. The service for over 30 people would simply take too long and we wouldn't be able to get to Amberley before it gets dark. So please make sure you bring packed lunches. We will stop for lunch here for one hour., but to stay on track we will have to leave at 14:00. So if we are walking slower then average the time for lunch may be shorter. More about the walk: The walk starts and ends along the River Arun. It goes up Arundel’s old High Street, lined with ancient buildings, to the Duke of Norfolk’s castle. The Norfolk family have been Roman Catholics for centuries, hence you pass the only church in the UK that is part Catholic and part Protestant (the Catholic part is their chapel, separated off by an iron grille). You pass the Roman Catholic Cathedral then enter the 1,240-acre Arundel Park (the park is closed on March 24th each year, but the public footpaths should remain open on that day). From the Hiorne Tower, you descend to Swanbourne Lake, then go up and through the Park to exit it through a gap in the wall, to walk above the River Arun again. The route leads you to the isolated hamlet of South Stoke, with its unusual church and from there you walk beside the river all the way to the village of Burpham, with its church, and pub – your lunchtime stop. The afternoon’s walk, up, over and down the chalky South Downs, makes for a nice contrast to the morning’s walk. Amberley is a delightful village with many thatched houses, a pub, tea shop and village store, in addition to its castle and church. Next to the railway station is the Amberley Museum and Heritage Centre. Please note that we will not be entering the castle grounds. History: Arundel Castle was built at the end of the eleventh century by Roger de Montgomery, Earl of Arundel. The castle was damaged in the Civil War (changing hands twice) and was largely rebuilt in ‘idealised Norman’ style by Dukes of Norfolk in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. P The lack of labourers after the Black Death in 1349 led to the decay of St Nicholas Parish Church, Arundel, which was rebuilt in 1380. There were no pews, but there were stone seats around the side (hence the expression ‘the weakest go to the walls’). The building became barracks and stables for the parliamentarians during the Civil War – their guns laid siege to the castle from the church tower. In 1969, the then Duke of Norfolk opened up the wall between the Roman Catholic and Protestant parts of the church. For ecumenical special occasions, the iron grille dividing them is opened. Contact: If you have any doubts, queries or would like to chat to anyone about the best options for you, please contact us via email on [masked] or phone:[masked] . Click here to follow us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/CuriousKatsAdventureClub/ Click here to receive our monthly newsletter: https://www.katsadventures.com/

Past events (105)

HORSLEY JUBILEE TRAIL

Horsley Stn

£5.00

Photos (1,010)