• Richard Campbell: When Open Source Came to Microsoft continued

    Following on from his talk to us in Dec, Richard continues his exploration of open source at Microsoft:

    Today Microsoft seems to have open source running through its veins - but it wasn't always that way! So what changed? Join Richard Campbell as he takes you on a ride through the various moments in Microsoft history that led to its current focus on open source. The path to open source was not a straight line, but the twists and turns are what makes the story great!

    Bio
    Richard Campbell wrote his first line of code in 1977. His career has spanned the computing industry both on the hardware and software sides, development and operations. He was a co-founder of Strangeloop Networks, acquired by Radware in 2013 and was on the board of directors of Telerik that was acquired by Progress Software in 2014. Today he is a consultant and advisor to several successful technology firms and is the founder and chairman of Humanitarian Toolbox (www.htbox.org), a public charity that builds open-source software for disaster relief. Richard is also the host of two podcasts: .NET Rocks! (www.dotnetrocks.com) the Internet Audio Talkshow for .NET developers and RunAs Radio (www.runasradio.com), a weekly show for IT Professionals. He also produces the DevIntersection (www.devintersection.com) series of conferences.

    2
  • Event Modelling with Adam Dymitruk

    Online event

    Event Modelling is a technique to describe any information system without resorting to multiple or complex methodologies or diagrams. It is heavily based on Specification by Example and describes an entire system within its boundaries as defined in Systems Thinking.

    Adam is the author of Event Modelling. He has dedicated his career to building event-driven systems. He is one of the original contributors to the body of work around CQRS and Event Sourcing in the area of consensus for the source of truth in automated information systems. He has also focused on decentralization concepts along with open source and open standards efforts.

    2
  • Toby Sinclair with 'Changing Organisational Habits @ Scale'

    This session will explore the tiny shifts in behaviour that can transform organisational performance at an individual, team and company-wide level. It will focus on small habits to change behaviour.

    We often think big changes require big actions. Everything “at scale” is the buzz within many organisations adopting agile across the enterprise. Unfortunately, these big changes at scale often result in failure.

    The surprising truth is big changes often come through small, atomic habits, improved consistently over time. In fact, many agile frameworks like Scrum are a collection of small habits adopted together. The Daily Stand up is a great example of an agile daily habit.

    However small is not always simple. For a long time when coaching teams I would be frustrated when teams found it difficult to adopt seemingly simple habits.

    Through failure and success in my personal life, I’ve now learned that tiny habits, not big changes create breakthrough results. In my work with organisations, I realised that the habit changes I desired were too big. The key was to make new habits as tiny as possible. For example, a 2 minute stand up rather than 15 minutes.

    These approaches will be illustrated through several real case studies at organisations, demonstrating how tiny changes can help you change the culture in your organisation.

    Bio:
    Toby is a Business Executive based in London. He has 12+ years experience in the technology industry ranging from hands-on software development roles to senior leadership positions. The positions have been with globally recognised companies including JP Morgan Chase (Current), The Very Group, National Trust, Nationwide Building Society.

    Toby has a unique blend of skills both in technology and psychology disciplines. This enables him to work with people at all levels organisations with credibility and empathy.

    Technology skills have been developed as a hands-on developer building and testing customer solutions in many languages, following agile software development practices.

    Psychology skills come through professional coaching accreditation with the International Coaching Federation, applied in a personal and business context. This enables Toby to work with senior leaders and teams both personally and professionally to succeed in challenging environments.

    A deep knowledge and passion in understanding human behaviour, Toby applies this to organisational design, leadership development, group facilitation. Toby also has a Post Graduate Degree in Personal and Business Coaching.

    This bend of skills across technology and psychology means Toby flourishes in agile, adaptive working environments, succeeding in situations with high complexity and uncertainty.

    Toby has an in-depth knowledge of agile working practices ranging from single team scrum, large scale scrum and flow-based approaches such as Kanban. He has coached 100's of leaders and teams in adopting these practices.

    Notable achievements include:
    - Transitioning JP Morgan Chase Global Technology to a Product aligned operating model. A change that impacted 8,000+ employees
    - Establishing a global change agent network, Catalyst, that grew to over 500+ global members
    - Transforming a traditional call centre help desk to adopt agile ways of working to better serve their customers
    - Transforming a Software Development Division of a major investment bank to adopt Large Scale Scrum organisational design
    - Created an internal Agile Coaching practice, hiring 15 coaches globally

    A sampler of the conferences Toby has been invited to speak at:
    - SEACON 2020 - Lessons learned becoming a Product-Centric organization
    - Agile Scotland 2020 - Changing Habits @ Scale
    - Agile 2019 (Washington DC) - Reflective Writing for your Self-Care toolkit
    - Agile 2018 (San Diego) – Agile Coaching v Professional Coaching

    1
  • 'Applying Team Topologies at PureGym' with Rich Allen

    Online event

    As the IT team at PureGym grew beyond 20, the strategy of using short-lived project teams with handovers to maintenance teams started to result in reduced productivity and lower morale caused by the complications of managing multiple projects and complex systems. Their approach to value delivery needed to change.
    Using the ideas described in Team Topologies, PureGym was able to communicate how and why working practices needed to adapt using the core concepts to give team members more ownership and autonomy whilst reducing their cognitive load. This presentation describes PureGym’s journey in the adoption of the Team Topologies principles and practices.

    Bio:
    Richard Allen, Head of Consulting at Conjurer Solutions (https://conjurersolutions.co.uk/), has been developing software and helping organisations implement lean and agile ways of working for over two decades.
    Richard specialises in the application of Continuous Improvement practices and helps businesses uncover bottlenecks, highlight opportunities to optimise for flow and introduce ways of encouraging feedback in a culture of continuous learning.
    Richard is co-founder of the Developer South Coast technology user group in the UK (https://www.meetup.com/DeveloperSouthCoast/) which has been helping developers discover and learn about new technologies for over thirteen years.

    5
  • Infrastructure as code, an introduction to Terraform with John Martin

    Building reliable and repeatable infrastructure deployments that can be transitioned through Development, Test, and into production is becoming increasingly essential. There are many options including PowerShell, ARM, Cloud Formation and many more that you can use depending on your cloud of choice. But what if you want vendor lock in? Enter Terraform. An open source Infrastructure as code platform that works with Azure, AWS, and others as well as on-premises environments. Together we will look at how this can work with our cloud platform of choice to help speed up our ability o define and deploy resources.

    Bio:
    John is an experienced data platform and cloud technology consultant specialising in Microsoft technologies as well as a Data Platform MVP. Happy to talk data, security, and DevOps until the cows come home sharing the things learned over more years than he cares to remember fixing weird and wonderful problems.

    2
  • Effective Microservice Communication and Conversation Patterns with Jimmy Bogard

    Orchestration or choreography? Sagas or process manager? REST, RPC, or events? Are we just making this all up as we go along?

    Microservices introduce major complexities the moment we move away from a single service and process to multiple ones. Immediately, the problem hits: services have to communicate. The architect mandates REST. But nothing works in production. Then come events. But nothing is ever completed. So now what?

    Let’s look at the problem holistically: We want to uphold the fundamental autonomy of any microservice-based architecture while designing a communication strategy that enables services to achieve their purpose in the world.

    That’s where patterns come in. In this talk, we’ll look at some basic communication patterns, see where we might run into problems and how advanced conversational patterns can help. We’ll walk you through some real-world scenarios to demonstrate how complex coordination and conversation patterns can get services communicating effectively while retaining our all-important autonomy and loose coupling.

    Jimmy Bogard
    Independent Consultant
    Jimmy is a member of the ASPInsiders group, the C# Insiders group, and has received the "Microsoft Most Valuable Professional" (MVP) award every year since 2009. Jimmy is also the creator and maintainer of the popular OSS libraries AutoMapper and MediatR. Jimmy is an independent consultant, and the chief architect at Headspring, a custom software consultancy based in Austin, TX.

  • Richard Campbell: When Open Source Came to Microsoft

    Online event

    Today Microsoft seems to have open source running through its veins - but it wasn't always that way! So what changed? Join Richard Campbell as he takes you on a ride through the various moments in Microsoft history that led to its current focus on open source. The path to open source was not a straight line, but the twists and turns are what makes the story great!

    Bio
    Richard Campbell wrote his first line of code in 1977. His career has spanned the computing industry both on the hardware and software sides, development and operations. He was a co-founder of Strangeloop Networks, acquired by Radware in 2013 and was on the board of directors of Telerik that was acquired by Progress Software in 2014. Today he is a consultant and advisor to several successful technology firms and is the founder and chairman of Humanitarian Toolbox (www.htbox.org), a public charity that builds open-source software for disaster relief. Richard is also the host of two podcasts: .NET Rocks! (www.dotnetrocks.com) the Internet Audio Talkshow for .NET developers and RunAs Radio (www.runasradio.com), a weekly show for IT Professionals. He also produces the DevIntersection (www.devintersection.com) series of conferences.

    4
  • Moving to Microservices: Containers versus Serverless - with Mark Heath

    Many companies are looking for a path to migrate from legacy monolithic applications, towards a more modern, cloud-based microservice architecture. But there are many choices along the way. How do you pick between two of the hottest trends in cloud architecture at the moment: containers and serverless? In this session you'll learn about the strengths of both approaches, how to pick the right approach for your business requirements, and some of the key challenges you need to be prepared for. We'll see how this can work in practice by looking at several key Azure technologies that enable these architectures such as Azure Kubernetes Service, Azure Functions, and Azure Container Instances. And we'll see how the strengths of serverless and containerization can even be combined together into a hybrid architecture providing the best of both worlds.

    Mark is a Microsoft MVP, Pluralsight author and open source developer. He works as .NET developer and software architect, building digital evidence management systems in Azure for the police. You can keep up with what he's doing on his blog at http://markheath.net or on Twitter
    @mark_heath

  • Isaac Abraham: 'Authoring ARM templates the easy way with Farmer'

    Azure Resource Manager templates have made repeatable deployments on Azure a reality. However, the true cost of these templates is the cost of authoring them, generally involving painstaking and error-prone management of JSON files.

    Whilst improvements in tooling have helped ameliorate this problem, there's a need to rethink how we create ARM templates, which is where the Farmer project comes in.

    In this session you'll be exposed to the following:

    * Learn about the basics of ARM templates and the value proposition behind them

    * Understand the cost of working with ARM templates

    * See how we can use a .NET domain specific language (DSL) to rapidly author and work with ARM templates.

    * See common use cases and cost-benefit of ARM templates

    * Look at ways of dealing with elements such as parameterisation and variables through a programming language rather than through JSON and stringly-typed expressions

    * Discuss how to deploy ARM templates through repeatable continuous integration and deployment tools

    Bio:

    Isaac Abraham

    Founder of Compositional IT

    Microsoft .NET MVP

    Twitter @isaac_abraham

    Isaac Abraham is a .NET developer since .NET 1.0 with an interest in cloud computing and distributed data problems. He is the author of Get Programming with F# and the director of Compositional IT. He specializes in consultancy, training and development, helping customers adopt high-quality, functional-first solutions on the .NET platform.

    1
  • Internationalisation beyond translation - with John Kilmister

    As the world gets smaller Internationalisation (and Localisation) is something that more developers need to think about, yet it is a complex subject. It is also, however, one of those things that a few small changes at the right time can save a lot of effort down the line.

    Through the talk we will cover a wide range of topics and areas from alphabets to zip codes, date formatting and time zones, through to how to handle national and cultural considerations in your work.

    We will also look at how the C# code we write and the frameworks we use can both help and hinder the process of turning your application global.

    By the end of the session you should have a new appreciation of some of the challenges with pointers on how to start approaching them. If you have never thought how to support a diverse world or what it would take to make an app/website work across the globe this may interest you.

    John is a Dev South Coast regular and a developer for over 20 years. First starting as VB6 then a .net developer on the 1.1 framework. John has worked on a number of large international websites servicing many different countries in many different languages and is currently at Pure Gym as their Principal Software Architect.

    3