What we're about

https://secure.meetupstatic.com/photos/event/2/1/0/e/600_414068462.jpeg

The Center is based on the Gelug lineage of Tibetan Buddhism, the spiritual tradition of His Holiness the Dalai Lama, and is part of the Foundation for the Preservation of the Mahayana Tradition (FPMT) (http://fpmt.org/), an international family of city and retreat centers, monasteries, publishing houses, hospices, and healing centers that share that purpose.

This organization is run by individuals dedicated to providing an integral educational experience through which minds and hearts can be transformed into their highest potential for the benefit of all sentient beings. By following an attitude of universal responsibility, we seek to create harmonious environments everywhere and offer these teachings. The spiritual director for the Center is Lama Zopa Rinpoche.

The Center hosts weekly Buddhist teachings, guided meditations, and other related events. It is located at 6165 Ridgeview Court, Suite G in Reno, Nevada.

Visit the Center’s website at: http://www.dharmakayacenter.com

Upcoming events (5)

Drop-in Meditation

Online event

NOTE: THE LINKS FOR WEDNESDAY AND FRIDAY ZOOM MEETINGS ARE DIFFERENT. PLEASE BE SURE TO CLICK ON APPROPRIATE LINK. Wednesday Password:[masked] Friday Password:[masked] Meditation is an effective, yet simple, way of dealing with many stresses in life. There is a growing body of scientific evidence of meditation being highly effective at reducing physical and mental stress. Every week we focus on one topic from excellent meditations based on the Lamrim that are suitable for anyone interested in exploring and incorporating the benefits of meditation into their daily lives, regardless of whether you are a Buddhist practitioner or not. Nov. 4 & Nov. 6: Compassion/Tonglen Nov. 11 & Nov. 13: Dealing with Negative Emotions: Attachment Nov. 18 & Nov. 20: Dealing with Negative Emotions: Anger Nov. 25 & Nov. 22: Dealing with Negative Emotions: Depression Dec. 2 & Dec. 5: Dealing with Negative Emotions: Fear SUGGESTED DONATION: $5 (No one turned away for lack of funds!)

Drop-in Meditation

Online event

NOTE: THE LINKS FOR WEDNESDAY AND FRIDAY ZOOM MEETINGS ARE DIFFERENT. PLEASE BE SURE TO CLICK ON APPROPRIATE LINK. Wednesday Password:[masked] Friday Password:[masked] Meditation is an effective, yet simple, way of dealing with many stresses in life. There is a growing body of scientific evidence of meditation being highly effective at reducing physical and mental stress. Every week we focus on one topic from excellent meditations based on the Lamrim that are suitable for anyone interested in exploring and incorporating the benefits of meditation into their daily lives, regardless of whether you are a Buddhist practitioner or not. Nov. 4 & Nov. 6: Compassion/Tonglen Nov. 11 & Nov. 13: Dealing with Negative Emotions: Attachment Nov. 18 & Nov. 20: Dealing with Negative Emotions: Anger Nov. 25 & Nov. 22: Dealing with Negative Emotions: Depression Dec. 2 & Dec. 5: Dealing with Negative Emotions: Fear SUGGESTED DONATION: $5 (No one turned away for lack of funds!)

How Problems Help with Karuna Cayton

Online event

How Problems Help with Karuna Cayton​ Saturday and Sunday, December 5th and 6th 10:00 AM - 3:00 PM (one hour lunch)​ To try and overcome the plethora of problems that plague our daily life is an endless task. We can never get rid of all the problems we face, our family faces, our community, country and the world at large. So, does that mean we are forever destined to a life of victimhood? To practice a spiritual path is not the same as practicing a religion. Spiritual practitioners seek to actualize their fullest and deepest potential as a human being. ​In the Mahayana Buddhist tradition we are presented with a strategy to actualize our potential in a swift and skillful way: by transforming problems into the spiritual path itself. To develop our potential means to develop vast compassion, deep wisdom, and effective approaches to help others. These qualities are not developed without being challenged by difficult people and hard situations. No one develops compassion while lying on a beach enjoying the perfect holiday. Out qualities are developed through difficult people and situations. Karuna has been a student of Buddhist psychology and philosophy for over 30 years. A long time student of Lama Yeshe and Lama Zopa Rinpoche, he worked for the lamas at Kopan Monastery from[masked]. During that time he created and taught the secular studies program for the resident Tibetan and Nepali monks. He also assisted in running the Buddhist programs for foreign visitors and was the co-founder and director of the city center in Kathmandu, Himalayan Yogic Institute. He has been on the FPMT Board of Directors since 1988.After returning to the US in 1988 he received his MA in Clinical Psychology from JFK University in 1992. He has worked at the Children's Health Council at Stanford University and trained interns in Narrative Therapy at Mental Research Institute (MRI) in Palo Alto.

How Problems Help with Karuna Cayton

Online event

How Problems Help with Karuna Cayton​ Saturday and Sunday, December 5th and 6th 10:00 AM - 3:00 PM (one hour lunch)​ To try and overcome the plethora of problems that plague our daily life is an endless task. We can never get rid of all the problems we face, our family faces, our community, country and the world at large. So, does that mean we are forever destined to a life of victimhood? To practice a spiritual path is not the same as practicing a religion. Spiritual practitioners seek to actualize their fullest and deepest potential as a human being. ​In the Mahayana Buddhist tradition we are presented with a strategy to actualize our potential in a swift and skillful way: by transforming problems into the spiritual path itself. To develop our potential means to develop vast compassion, deep wisdom, and effective approaches to help others. These qualities are not developed without being challenged by difficult people and hard situations. No one develops compassion while lying on a beach enjoying the perfect holiday. Out qualities are developed through difficult people and situations. Karuna has been a student of Buddhist psychology and philosophy for over 30 years. A long time student of Lama Yeshe and Lama Zopa Rinpoche, he worked for the lamas at Kopan Monastery from[masked]. During that time he created and taught the secular studies program for the resident Tibetan and Nepali monks. He also assisted in running the Buddhist programs for foreign visitors and was the co-founder and director of the city center in Kathmandu, Himalayan Yogic Institute. He has been on the FPMT Board of Directors since 1988.After returning to the US in 1988 he received his MA in Clinical Psychology from JFK University in 1992. He has worked at the Children's Health Council at Stanford University and trained interns in Narrative Therapy at Mental Research Institute (MRI) in Palo Alto.

Past events (1,086)

Book Discussion Group

Online event

Photos (147)

Find us also at