Scrum Patterns

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Details

We're happy to have Jim Coplien around for a Scrum evening. If you ask Scrum team members about the basics of Scrum, most people get most of it wrong (we’ll test you, too, just for fun, at this event). And if you ask people about the deeper fundamentals, the results are even worse. And many of these people are certified! What’s the problem? That’s tonight’s focus point. Scrum Patterns and principles.

Agenda
17.00: Doors open
17.15: Welcome by GOTO
17.30: Scrum Patterns part one
18.30: Food and drinks
19.00: Scrum Patterns part two + raffle of GOTO Ticket
20.00: Network
20.30: Thanks for today

More about the talk
If you ask even Scrum team members about the basics of Scrum, most people get most of it wrong (we’ll test you, too, just for fun, at this event). And if you ask people about the deeper fundamentals, the results are even worse. And many of these people are certified! What’s the problem? The problem seems to be that most people view Scrum as a collection of things (artifacts, practices, roles, etc.) rather than as a whole. Sure it has features that we can describe independently, but until you understand how those parts combine, it is unlikely that they’ll work together in the way Scrum intends.

Patterns explain the connections between the parts and, maybe more importantly, describe why we do what we do in Scrum to set a team on a path of learning their way to a better process. The new Scrum Patterns in “A Scrum Book” tap the insights of the experts in the Scrum community to help you understand this why. Understanding why we do the Daily Scrum (do you know why?) will help you do it better and maybe, in a few year’s time, to complete redesign your process to achieve the same ends (as one does in a Type C Scrum). So patterns are a deep dive into Scrum and into the broader social process of making something together.
In this session we’ll motivate Scrum Patterns’ value and point you in a direction to immediately start benefiting from them.

More about the speaker
Jim Coplien is the founder of the Pasteur Organizational Patterns project, which was the foundation for the Borland QuatroPro for Windows study that inspired Jeff Sutherland to include daily stand-up meetings in Scrum. This work was also one of the main foundations underlying the organizational principles of Extreme Programming. In a former life Cope is best known for his design and programming books such as Advanced C++, Multi-Paradigm Design, and the pioneering two books of the PLoPD series of edited works. He is also one of the founders of the pattern discipline, and he is the Product Owner for the Scrum patterns effort at ScrumPLoP.