What we're about

A Philosophy, Religion, Political book discussion group based on Columbia University's Contemporary Civilization Curriculum from Plato to Nietzsche and into the 20th Century. With bi-weekly sessions, the entire cycle should take 30 months to complete but one could join at any point in our survey of the 2500-year development of human thought. For a preview of course texts, under "Photos," select "Phil Book Covers."

Upcoming events (2)

[Online] Sartre: Being and Nothingness [1943] Pt 4, Ch 2, and Conclusion

Join us as we complete our reading & discussing of Being and Nothingness in our eleventh and final session on Sartre's magnum opus. A brief recap of prior sessions will be offered.

Existentialism, arguably the most influential philosophical movement of the 20th Century, is exemplified in the life and works of Jean Paul Sartre, particularly in his magnum opus, Being and Nothingness. Building on the groundbreaking fundamentals of Heidegger’s Being and Time, Sartre articulated a way to live a life without God, in a world devastated by two cataclysmic wars. Loved and hated in probable equal measure, Sartre’s thought indisputably impacted the culture, society, philosophy, psychology, and politics of the post-war era. Let’s explore the relevance of his thought for this troubled century..

Topic: Sartre's Being and Nothingness
New Year Meetup:
Time: Jan 30,[masked]:00a Pacific /2:00p Eastern

Please read:
PART FOUR: TO HAVE, TO DO, AND TO BE
Chapter 2, To do and to have:
Section I, Existential psychoanalysis &
Section II, To do and to have: possession &
Section III, The revelation of being through qualities
Conclusion:
Section I, In-itself and for-itself: some metaphysical observations &
Section II, Moral Perspectives
[Richmond ed.; pages:[masked], Barnes Ed.: 7xx-8xx]

Join us:
ONLINE: At start-time, join Zoom Meeting via this link:
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85075985676?pwd=b3B5SGdkMFViR2pCZ0p5eWp3elhIQT09

Meeting ID:[masked]
Passcode:[masked]

See this space a day or two before the Zoom to download the session handout -thanks to Lindsie.

Our schedule (subject to change):[masked]: J-P Sartre, Nausea [1938][masked]: Max Horkheimer and Theodor W. Adorno,
Dialectic of Enlightenment [1947] Translated by Edmund Jephcott. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2007. ISBN:[masked]

Spr/Sum/Fall 2022:
Fanon, The Wretched of the Earth [1961] (Grove, 2005)
Kuhn, Structure of Scientific Revolutions [1962] (Chicago, 2012)
Derrida, Writing and Difference [1967] (Chicago, 2017)
Rawls, A Theory of Justice [1971] (Harvard, 2020)
Nozick, Anarchy, State, and Utopia [1974] (Basic, 2013)
Foucault, Discipline and Punish [1975] (Penguin, 2020)
MacIntyre, After Virtue [1981] (3rd Ed. Notre Dame, 2007)

From SEP on Sartre:
[Sartre] read the leading phenomenologists of the day, Husserl, Heidegger and Scheler. He prized Husserl's restatement of the principle of intentionality (all consciousness aims at or “intends” an other-than-consciousness) that seemed to free the thinker from the inside/outside epistemology inherited from Descartes while retaining the immediacy and certainty that Cartesians prized so highly. What he read of Heidegger at that time is unclear, but he deals with the influential German ontologist explicitly after his return and especially in his masterwork, Being and Nothingness (1943). He exploits the latter's version of Husserlian intentionality by insisting that human reality (Heidegger's Dasein or human way of being) is “in the world” primarily via its practical concerns and not its epistemic relationships. This lends both Heidegger's and Sartre's early philosophies a kind of “pragmatist” character that Sartre, at least, will never abandon. It has been remarked that many of the Heideggerian concepts in Sartre's existentialist writings also occur in those of Bergson, whose “Les Données immediates de la conscience” (Time and Free Will) Sartre once credited with drawing him toward philosophy....

Any attendees who have not read the text will be invited to pose questions via the Zoom Chat.

Edition:
Jean-Paul Sartre. Being and Nothingness: an essay in phenomenological ontology.

1956 translation by Hazel Barnes.
Washington Square Press, 1992. ISBN:[masked].

2018 Translation by Sarah Richmond:
Washington Square Press, 2021. ISBN:[masked].

Charts and explication:
http://absurdbeing.com/sartre.php

Here is a Great Courses video on French existentialism:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C2CfzMxMPF4

Paste the link here in your browser for a draft syllabus for our course of study.
http://www.college.columbia.edu/core/sites/core/files/pages/CONTEMPORARY%20CIVILIZATION%20SYLLABUS%202021-22.pdf

[Online] Jean-Paul Sartre: Nausea [1938]

Online event

Topic: Sartre's Nausea
Time: Feb 13,[masked]:00a Pacific /2:00p Eastern

Join us:
ONLINE: At start-time, join Zoom Meeting via this link:
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85075985676?pwd=b3B5SGdkMFViR2pCZ0p5eWp3elhIQT09

Meeting ID:[masked]
Passcode:[masked]

From SEP on Sartre:
Sartre's early work Nausea (1938) is the very model of a philosophical novel. Its protagonist, Roquentin, works through many of the major themes of Being and Nothingness that will appear five years later. It can be read as an extended meditation on the contingency of our existence and on the psychosomatic experience that captures that phenomenon. In his famous meditation on a tree root, Roquentin experiences the brute facticity of its existence and of his own: both are simply there, without justification, in excess (de trop). The physicality of this revelatory “sickly sweet” sensation should not be overlooked. Like the embarrassment felt before the Other's gaze in the voyeur example cited earlier, our bodily intentionality (what he calls “the body as for-itself”) is revealing an ontological reality.

Any attendees who have not read the text will be invited to pose questions via the Zoom Chat.

Edition:
Jean-Paul Sartre. Nausea, 1938
Trans.: Robert Baldick. Penguin Modern Classic,[masked] ISBN:[masked]
Trans.: Lloyd Alexander. New Directions,[masked] ISBN:[masked]

Free PDF: http://www.kkoworld.com/kitablar/jan_pol_satr_urekbulanma-eng.pdf

Explication:
http://absurdbeing.com/sartre.php

Here is a Great Courses video on French existentialism:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C2CfzMxMPF4

Our schedule (subject to change):[masked]: J-P Sartre, Nausea [1938][masked]: Max Horkheimer and Theodor W. Adorno,
Dialectic of Enlightenment [1947] Translated by Edmund Jephcott. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2007. ISBN:[masked]

Spr/Sum/Fall 2022:
Fanon, The Wretched of the Earth [1961] (Grove, 2005)
Kuhn, Structure of Scientific Revolutions [1962] (Chic, 2012)
Derrida, Writing and Difference [1967] (Chicago, 2017)
Rawls, A Theory of Justice [1971] (Harvard, 2020)
Foucault, Discipline and Punish [1975] (Penguin, 2020)

Paste the link here in your browser for a draft syllabus for our course of study. https://www.college.columbia.edu/core/sites/core/files/pages/CONTEMPORARY%20CIVILIZATION%20SYLLABUS%202021-22.pdf

Photos (202)