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Holistic Wellness

aka Holistic Health
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Holistic health (or holistic medicine) is a diverse field of alternative medicine (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alternative_medicine)[1] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holistic_health#cite_note-qw-1) in which the "whole person" is focused on, not just the malady itself.[2] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holistic_health#cite_note-acs-2)

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Yoga (Sanskrit (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sanskrit), Pāli (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/P%C4%81li): योग (http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%E0%A4%AF%E0%A5%8B%E0%A4%97) yóga) is a physical (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_body), mental (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mind), and spiritual (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soul) discipline, originating in ancient India (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ancient_India).[1] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yoga#cite_note-0)[2] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yoga#cite_note-1) The goal of yoga, or of the person practicing yoga, is the attainment of a state of perfect spiritual insight and tranquility while meditating (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meditation) on Supersoul (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vishnu).[3] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yoga#cite_note-2) The word is associated with meditative practices in Hinduism (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hinduism), Jainism (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jainism) and Buddhism (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buddhism).[4] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yoga#cite_note-3)[5] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yoga#cite_note-4)[6] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yoga#cite_note-Tattvarthasutra_2007_p._102-5)

Within Hindu philosophy (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hindu_philosophy), the word yoga is used to refer to one of the six orthodox (āstika (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C4%80stika_and_n%C4%81stika)) schools of Hindu philosophy (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hindu_philosophy).[7] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yoga#cite_note-6)[8] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yoga#cite_note-7) Yoga in this sense is based on the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yoga_Sutras_of_Patanjali), and is also known as Rāja Yoga (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/R%C4%81ja_Yoga) to distinguish it from later schools.[9] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yoga#cite_note-8) Patanjali's system is discussed and elaborated upon in many classical Hindu texts (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hindu_texts), and has also been influential inBuddhism (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buddhism) and Jainism (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jainism). The Bhagavad Gita (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bhagavad_Gita) introduces distinctions such as Jnana Yoga (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jnana_Yoga) ("yoga based on knowledge") vs. Karma Yoga (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karma_Yoga) ("yoga based on action").

Other systems of philosophy introduced in Hinduism during the medieval period are bhakti yoga (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bhakti_yoga), and hatha yoga (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hatha_yoga).[10] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yoga#cite_note-yogaTrads1_042007-9)[11] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yoga#cite_note-yogaTrads2_042007-10)[12] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yoga#cite_note-yogaTrads_3042007-11)

The Sanskrit (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sanskrit) word yoga has the literal meaning of "yoke", from a root yuj meaning to join, to unite, or to attach. As a term for a system of abstract meditation or mental abstraction it was introduced by Patañjali (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pata%C3%B1jali) in the 2nd century BC. Someone who practices yoga or follows the yoga philosophy with a high level of commitment is called a yogi (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yogi) or yogini (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yogini).[13] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yoga#cite_note-12)

The goals of yoga are varied and range from improving health to achieving moksha (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moksha).[14] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yoga#cite_note-Jacobsen.2C_p._10-13) Within the Hindu monist (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monism) schools of Advaita Vedanta (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Advaita_Vedanta), Shaivism (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shaivism) and Jainism, the goal of yoga takes the form of moksha, which is liberation from all worldly suffering and the cycle of birth and death (samsara (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samsara)), at which point there is a realization of identity with the Supreme Brahman (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brahman). In the Mahabharata, the goal of yoga is variously described as entering the world of Brahma (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brahma), as Brahman, or as perceiving the Brahman or Ātman (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C4%80tman_(Hinduism)) that pervades all things.[15] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yoga#cite_note-14) For the bhakti (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bhakti)schools of Vaishnavism (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vaishnavism), bhakti or service to Svayam Bhagavan (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Svayam_Bhagavan) itself may be the ultimate goal of the yoga process, where the goal is to enjoy an eternal relationship with Vishnu (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vishnu).[16] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yoga#cite_note-15)

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