What we're about

The centerpiece of the discussion will be a non-fiction book, but the discussions' value will come from the everyone's inputs. Disagreements or agreements, what matters is how you engage with the knowledge learned in the book and everyone's ideas. The diverse backgrounds we come from will cause us to have different approaches to the topic which will elucidate arguments for and against the topic. Critical thinking enables the group to understand the ideas in their complexity.

My role of moderator is to make sure everyone gets heard. Within the discussion, priority goes to those who did not speak much, which facilitates diverse perspectives.

Due to situation, events are currently being help online but going to return to in-person discussion when feasible. Please RSVP is you are confident you will come.

Goodreads affiliated site: https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/976921-inquiry-non-fiction-book-club-for-inquiring-minds

The list of books are all member suggestions. Every cycle members suggest books, and then poll which book they wish to read. Books are selected for poll rank, topic diversity, and page length. Poll ratings are taken into account as they let me know which books are preferred reads. Genre diversity is taken into account to make sure the books are inclusive of everyone's interest and facilitate curiously about topics allowing those who do not know much about the topic, to get introduced to it via book and discussion. Page length is taken into account to make sure that very long books are not being read back to back.

Past Events: 18

Attendance: Average = 8, Standard Deviation = 4

Author Appearance = 3

Upcoming events (5)

Ten Lessons for a Post-Pandemic World by Fareed Zakaria

Book was suggested by Miriam Pages to read: 185 ISBN:[masked] (Originally listed edition) ISBN:[masked] (Edition I am using) While reading the book, consider the below questions: • What is the raison d’etre of the book? For what purpose did the author write the book? • Why is coronavirus so virulent? • How are pandemics handled? Compare how they were handled before and now. • Why are some countries able to effectively handle the pandemic while others having so much trouble? • What are some shifts in international politics? • Why were hospitals unprepared for a surge in hospital care needs? • Why do people support a particular political party? How does this influence their ideological commitments? • How do experts operate? • Why are experts not trusted? • What is the problem with scientist making bold claims? How does the public react to the claims? • How have views changed to going digital? • Who benefits from going digital? • How did markets react to the pandemic? Your questions are important and will take priority. If you have questions about the book's content or related ideas, either let me know what your questions are or raise them during the discussion. Summary from Goodreads: Lenin once said, “There are decades when nothing happens and weeks when decades happen.” This is one of those times when history has sped up. CNN host and best-selling author Fareed Zakaria helps readers to understand the nature of a post-pandemic world: the political, social, technological, and economic impacts that may take years to unfold. In the form of ten straightforward “lessons,” covering topics from globalization and threat-preparedness to inequality and technological advancement, Zakaria creates a structure for readers to begin thinking beyond the immediate impacts of COVID-19. Ten Lessons for a Post-Pandemic World speaks to past, present, and future, and, while urgent and timely, is sure to become an enduring staple.

The Power Broker: Robert Moses and the Fall of New York by Robert A. Caro

[masked] One of the most acclaimed books of our time, winner of both the Pulitzer and the Francis Parkman prizes, The Power Broker tells the hidden story behind the shaping (and mis-shaping) of twentieth-century New York (city and state) and makes public what few have known: that Robert Moses was, for almost half a century, the single most powerful man of our time in New York, the shaper not only of the city's politics but of its physical structure and the problems of urban decline that plague us today. In revealing how Moses did it--how he developed his public authorities into a political machine that was virtually a fourth branch of government, one that could bring to their knees Governors and Mayors (from La Guardia to Lindsay) by mobilizing banks, contractors, labor unions, insurance firms, even the press and the Church, into an irresistible economic force--Robert Caro reveals how power works in all the cities of the United States. Moses built an empire and lived like an emperor. He personally conceived and completed public works costing 27 billion dollars--the greatest builder America (and probably the world) has ever known. Without ever having been elected to office, he dominated the men who were--even his most bitter enemy, Franklin D. Roosevelt, could not control him--until he finally encountered, in Nelson Rockefeller, the only man whose power (and ruthlessness in wielding it) equalled his own.

How the Irish Saved Civilization: The Untold Story of Ireland's by Thomas Cahill

Full Title: How the Irish Saved Civilization: The Untold Story of Ireland's Heroic Role from the Fall of Rome to the Rise of Medieval Europe Book was suggested by Miriam Pages to read: 162 ISBN:[masked] (Originally listed edition) ISBN:[masked] (Edition I am using) While reading the book, consider the below questions: •What is the raison d’etre of the book? For what purpose did the author write the book? •What was lost when Rome fell? •What was preserved when Rome fell? •Why did the fall of Rome precipitate in the creation of the Feudalistic era? •Why was Roman law used after Rome fell? •What do you think of Irish culture? •How did the Irish save civilization? •How did Patrick convert the Irish to Christianity? •Why did the monks start education students? •Why were the monks tolerant of different people and ideas? •Why were monks important for the transmission of information? Your questions are important and will take priority. If you have questions about the book's content or related ideas, either let me know what your questions are or raise them during the discussion. Summary from Goodreads: From the fall of Rome to the rise of Charlemagne - the "dark ages" - learning, scholarship, and culture disappeared from the European continent. The great heritage of western civilization - from the Greek and Roman classics to Jewish and Christian works - would have been utterly lost were it not for the holy men and women of unconquered Ireland. In this delightful and illuminating look into a crucial but little-known "hinge" of history, Thomas Cahill takes us to the "island of saints and scholars, " the Ireland of St. Patrick and the Book of Kells. Here, far from the barbarian despoliation of the continent, monks and scribes laboriously, lovingly, even playfully preserved the west's written treasures. With the return of stability in Europe, these Irish scholars were instrumental in spreading learning. Thus the Irish not only were conservators of civilization, but became shapers of the medieval mind, putting their unique stamp on western culture.

Rule Makers, Rule Breakers: How Tight and Loose Cultures by Michele Gelfand

Pages to read: 206 ISBN: B07CL67RXJ (Originally listed edition) ISBN:[masked] (Edition I am Using) Alternative Title: Rule Makers, Rule Breakers: Tight and Loose Cultures and the Secret Signals that Direct Our Lives While reading the book, consider the below questions: •What is the raison d’etre of the book? For what purpose did the author write the book? •What are rule makers / rule breakers? •Why do we follow social norms? •How are social norms learned? •Are social norms moral? •What is the tight-loose trade-off? •What are the benefits and disadvantages of a tight culture? How about for loose cultures? •Is there a goldilocks condition between tight and loose for cultures? •Are cultural aspects permanent? •How do cultures change their cultural aspects? •What can cause a culture to become loose? How about become Tight? •What role does gossip play in social norms? •What happens when tight and loose cultures interact? Your questions are important and will take priority. If you have questions about the book's content or related ideas, either let me know what your questions are or raise them during the discussion. My Review of the Book: https://inquiryformanantilibrary.blogspot.com/2021/01/review-of-rule-makers-rule-breakers.html Summary from Goodreads: In Rule Makers, Rule Breakers celebrated cultural psychologist Michele Gelfand takes us on an epic journey through human cultures, offering a startling new view of the world and ourselves. With a mix of brilliantly conceived studies and surprising on-the-ground discoveries, she shows that much of the diversity in the way we think and act derives from a key difference—how tightly or loosely we adhere to social norms. Why are clocks in Germany so accurate while those in Brazil are frequently wrong? Why do New Zealand’s women have the highest number of sexual partners? Why are “Red” and “Blue” States really so divided? Why was the Daimler-Chrysler merger ill-fated from the start? Why is the driver of a Jaguar more likely to run a red light than the driver of a plumber’s van? Why does one spouse prize running a “tight ship” while the other refuses to “sweat the small stuff?” In search of a common answer, Gelfand has spent two decades conducting research in more than fifty countries. Across all age groups, family variations, social classes, businesses, states and nationalities, she’s identified a primal pattern that can trigger cooperation or conflict. Her fascinating conclusion: behavior is highly influenced by the perception of threat. With an approach that is consistently riveting, Rule Makers, Rule Breakers thrusts many of the puzzling attitudes and actions we observe into sudden and surprising clarity.

Past events (19)

Photos (4)