What we're about

Calling all tall and small Auckland film enthusiasts! Do you enjoy a good natter after a film and don’t want to go to the movies alone? Then let's watch together and talk about what we see. No one goes away after the discussion, without having learned more about the movie we have just watched.

Art (and film art) creates thought, reactions; it stimulates ideas, challenges and encourages our beliefs and in short creates a community of depth as well as friendship and mutual understanding.

We meet in the Ellen Melville Centre on the first Tuesday of the month at 6.30pm. We also have "Our Very Own Film Festivals", usually 3 films from the same country. These are in members homes and limited to 12 people. We bring a little something to eat and drink together, based on a recipe or whatever from that country

We head for those films that have been recognised and awarded as artistically significant at international film festivals. That doesn’t guarantee a film that we will all like of course, but it is a start.

If you would like to suggest a film, lets know. You are welcome to host a film in your home, and come to any of our events.

See you at the movies.

Upcoming events (3)

The Divine Order (Switzerland, 2017) Online

Online event

Lets begin the year with comedy-drama that doesn't take itself too seriously. It is a hot summer and we should chillax a bit. I know that we are all a bit sick of zoom, but a chat about this movie on zoom won't hurt.

"The Divine Order" is a fine little movie about women's sufferage movement in Switzerland and has nice points to make and great acting.

To "get" this film, you have to remember that women weren't given the vote until 1971 and a husband could stop his wife working up until 1985. The Guardian reviewer writes that this is a feel good movie, a little OTT, "But still, there is something moving, and timely too, in the story of an inspirational wave of feminists threatening the status quo, fearlessly braving ridicule, mockery and the backlash against them."

The Times (UK) reviewer wrote: "We know the ending - Switzerland gave women the vote, becoming one of the last European countries to do so - but this is a warm telling of a neglected story."

Watch the film here
https://www.tvnz.co.nz/shows/the-divine-order

And then join the Zoom Meeting here at time above
https://zoom.us/j/7524313555?pwd=QloxYlp0L0NIbDdhQW9DOVhCSjdNdz09

Meeting ID:[masked]
Passcode: emc

Rehana Maryan Noor (Bangladesh, 2021) AT THE ELLEN MELVILLE CENTRE!

Ellen Melville Centre

This is the first Banglashi film to gain official selection at the 2001 Cannes Film Festival in the Un Certain Regard section. It is the first for us and well worth the watch.

Seeking justice for a sexual assualt on a student becomes an all-consuming vendetta for a female college professor.

The film succeeds in not allowing us to fully sympathise with the main character and yet admire her tenacity and bull-dog like determination.
The NZ Film Festival reviewer wrote: "A portrait of a woman who refuses to stay silent or stand aside in the face of abuse, Rehana Maryam Noor explores how the burden of guilt and action in the face of violence inevitably falls on all but the perpetrator."

This film seems to appeal to us in the Asia-Pacific region as it picked up the best actress and Grand Jury prizes at the Asia-Pacific Awards.

It is ultimately about suppressed but determined female rage and is the first of two on this theme with the Hive (Kosovo, 2021) coming next month

Bring me the head of Alfredo Garcia

The Capitol Cinema

An American barroom pianist and his prostitute girlfriend go on a trip through the Mexican underworld to collect the bounty on the head of a dead gigolo. Well that’s the sanitized account. This is not for the squeamish. Critics have much to say:
It plays like a pulp noir thriller by way of a road movie of the damned, marinated in mescal and left to rot in the desert sun. Oates' antihero is among the loneliest men in the cinema, and one of its greatest performances.
Fermented in a tragic romanticism placed firmly in a no-man's land between liberation and capitalism, Sam Peckinpah's 1974 thriller is a film that sticks in your mind's eye like a lingering sun spot. Intensely gruesome, (I won’t be going) but this movie is highly rated by many, lambasted by many and is guaranteed to keep your attention. Co-written and directed by Sam Peckinpah

Get your tickets here: https://ticketing.oz.veezi.com/purchase/1893?siteToken=heg709z4rmk2gh10ykam14wxm8

Past events (218)

NZ Short Films Gala Night! - celebrating our very own filmmakers

Ellen Melville Centre

Photos (286)