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Bodhi Meditation - Flushing (FREE)

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What we're about

This group is dedicated to provide information and experience on how to live a powerful life with any time of meditation, mental discipline or trance based experience. Our topics will include a broad range, including, certifications, philosophies, mind expanding experiences, etc.

Meditation From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia This article is about the mental discipline. For the form of alternative dispute resolution, see Mediation (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mediation). For other uses, see Meditation (disambiguation) (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meditation_(disambiguation)). http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/53/Endurodoug.jpg/300px-Endurodoug.jpg (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Endurodoug.jpg) http://bits.wikimedia.org/skins-1.17/common/images/magnify-clip.png (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Endurodoug.jpg) A statue of the Buddha (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buddha) meditating, Borim Temple, Korea (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Korea)

Meditation refers to any of a family of practices in which the practitioner trains his or her mind (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mind) or self-induces a mode of consciousness in order to realize some benefit.[1][2][3]

Meditation is generally an internally-invoked, personal practice, which an individual can do by themselves. Prayer beads (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prayer_beads) or other ritual objects may be used during meditation. Meditation may involve invoking or cultivating a feeling or internal state, such as compassion, or attending to a specific focal point. The term can refer to the state itself, as well as to practices or techniques employed to cultivate the state.[4]

There are dozens or more specific styles of meditation practice;[3] the word meditation may carry different meanings in different contexts. Meditation has been practiced since antiquity as a component of numerous religious traditions, especially, in Western countries, in monastic settings. In the Eastern spiritual traditions such as Hinduism and Buddhism, meditation is more commonly a practice engaged in by many, if not most, believers.

A 2007 study by the U.S. government found that nearly 9.4% of U.S. adults (over 20 million) had practiced meditation within the past 12 months, up from 7.6% (more than 15 million people) in 2002.[5]

Since the 1960s, meditation has been the focus of increasing scientific research (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Research_on_meditation) of uneven rigor and quality.[6] In over 1,000 published research studies, various methods of meditation have been linked to changes in metabolism, blood pressure, brain activation, and other bodily processes.[7][8] Meditation has been used in clinical settings as a method of stress and pain reduction.[9][10]

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