What we're about

This group is for women studying or working in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math.  This group will meet monthly to offer support to each other in our professional careers, to discuss challenges we are facing and hopefully learn some new skills.

Upcoming events (3)

Women in STEM Bookclub: 101 ESSAYS that will CHANGE the way YOU THINK

Needs a location

This bookclub is for women in STEM to explore workplace related themes that are centered on women, STEM issues and leadership. Through these book explorations, we share experiences, exchange new ideas and get support for whatever challenges we are currently facing.

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Title: 101 ESSAYS that will CHANGE the way YOU THINK
By: Brianna Wiest

In her second compilation of published writing, Brianna Wiest explores pursuing purpose over passion, embracing negative thinking, seeing the wisdom in daily routine, and becoming aware of the cognitive biases that are creating the way you see your life. This book contains never before seen pieces as well as some of Brianna's most popular essays, all of which just might leave you thinking: this idea changed my life.

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Whether you love the book, hate it, read one chapter, saw a YouTube video or never got around to reading it but would like to hear about it, please come join us! This is opportunity to join some fabulous fabulous women for conversation and lunch.

Hope to see you there!
Tara

Women in STEM Bookclub: The Gendered Brain

Needs a location

This bookclub is for women in STEM to explore workplace related themes that are centered on women, STEM issues and leadership. Through these book explorations, we share experiences, exchange new ideas and get support for whatever challenges we are currently facing.

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Title: The Gendered Brain: The new neuroscience that shatters the myth of the female brain.
By: Gina Rippon

Barbie or Lego? Reading maps or reading emotions? Do you have a female brain or a male brain? Or is that the wrong question?
On a daily basis we face deeply ingrained beliefs that our sex determines our skills and preferences, from toys and colours to career choice and salaries. But what does this mean for our thoughts, decisions and behaviour?
Using the latest cutting-edge neuroscience, Gina Rippon unpacks the stereotypes that bombard us from our earliest moments and shows how these messages mould our ideas of ourselves and even shape our brains. Rigorous, timely and liberating, The Gendered Brain has huge repercussions for women and men, for parents and children, and for how we identify ourselves.

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Whether you love the book, hate it, read one chapter, saw a YouTube video or never got around to reading it but would like to hear about it, please come join us! This is opportunity to join some fabulous fabulous women for conversation and lunch.

Hope to see you there!
Tara

Women in STEM Bookclub: Unlocking the Clubhouse Women in Computing

Needs a location

This bookclub is for women in STEM to explore workplace related themes that are centered on women, STEM issues and leadership. Through these book explorations, we share experiences, exchange new ideas and get support for whatever challenges we are currently facing.

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Title: Unlocking the Clubhouse - Women in Computing
By: Jane Margolis and Allan Fisher

Understanding and overcoming the gender gap in computer science education.
The information technology revolution is transforming almost every aspect of society, but girls and women are largely out of the loop. Although women surf the Web in equal numbers to men and make a majority of online purchases, few are involved in the design and creation of new technology. It is mostly men whose perspectives and priorities inform the development of computing innovations and who reap the lion's share of the financial rewards. As only a small fraction of high school and college computer science students are female, the field is likely to remain a "male clubhouse," absent major changes.
In Unlocking the Clubhouse, social scientist Jane Margolis and computer scientist and educator Allan Fisher examine the many influences contributing to the gender gap in computing. The book is based on interviews with more than 100 computer science students of both sexes from Carnegie Mellon University, a major center of computer science research, over a period of four years, as well as classroom observations and conversations with hundreds of college and high school faculty. The interviews capture the dynamic details of the female computing experience, from the family computer kept in a brother's bedroom to women's feelings of alienation in college computing classes. The authors investigate the familial, educational, and institutional origins of the computing gender gap. They also describe educational reforms that have made a dramatic difference at Carnegie Mellon—where the percentage of women entering the School of Computer Science rose from 7% in 1995 to 42% in 2000—and at high schools around the country.

***

Whether you love the book, hate it, read one chapter, saw a YouTube video or never got around to reading it but would like to hear about it, please come join us! This is opportunity to join some fabulous fabulous women for conversation and lunch.

Hope to see you there!
Tara

Past events (98)

Women in STEM Bookclub: Prisoners of Geography

Needs a location

Photos (62)