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April presentation night featuring talks by Lucas Mazza & Mark Wunsch

Please join us for our monthly presentation night featuring talks by Lucas Mazza and Mark Wunsch

Documentation for fun and profit

Good documentation will save you any day of the week, but yet a lot of developers dismiss the importance of writing it. Either documenting the source code of your gem or sharing the knowledge of how your dev team does its job can improve the communication among your coworkers or the ones looking forward to contribute to your code on GitHub. We are going to go through some examples of different well documented projects, what that brings to the table and stories of documentation in some projects from my last year at Plataformatec.

Lucas Mazza (@lucasmazza) is a ruby and front-end developer from São Paulo, Brazil, and member of the Plataformatec team, the company behind projects like Devise (authentication solution for Rails apps), SimpleForm (your favorite form build), Elixir (a programming language on top of the Erlang VM) and other tools for the Rails community.

"Emoji is serious business ��"

"Emoji" are a standard set of pictographs that, like the Ruby language, originate from Japan. If you have an iPhone, or a Mac running OS X Lion or above, you have a device that supports emoji. As their popularity increases, so is their usage amongst applications; using simple text filters to display them as images. GitHub, Campfire, and more have standardized around a set of codes that can be learned by studying the Emoji Cheat Sheet (http://www.emoji-cheat-sheet.com/).

In this talk, I'm going to discuss cross-platform issues that arise with emoji, and how you can suport emoji input and display in your application with minimum fuss thanks to the Rumoji and Gemoji gems. Along the way, we'll discuss Ruby String encoding, Unicode, and the pains of managing user input.

❤��


Mark is a lead software engineer at Gilt Groupe, working on the User Interface. He is the author of several lesser-known Rubygems. He tweets at @markwunsch and writes code that doesn't scale on https://github.com/mwunsch.

Join or login to comment.

  • Luke M.

    I :heart: the Emoji talk. It was definitely not a pile of :crap:

    April 10, 2013

  • Pete D.

    sick. :(

    April 9, 2013

  • David F.

    schedule conflict

    April 8, 2013

  • Rodrigo Pineda I.

    ya

    April 7, 2013

  • A former member
    A former member

    Can't wait

    March 26, 2013

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