• Francis Hwang on OpenTelemetry

    Online event

    Abstract
    You may have heard of OpenTelemetry: It's the new observability framework used by Heroku, GitHub, Shopify, and others. But what the heck is an observability framework? What problems does OpenTelemetry solve? Who is it for? And why does it seem so complicated? This will be a high-level introduction to OpenTelemetry from a Rubyists' perspective, with special attention given to who is currently getting value from it, and ways you could consider adopting it at your organization.

    Bio
    Francis Hwang is an independent software architect and process consultant. He's the founder of NYC.rb and a founding organizer of Gotham Ruby Conference.

    Agenda
    (all in Eastern Time zone)
    - 5:30pm Meeting start, welcome
    - 5:40pm First time attendees introductions, ice breaker
    - 6:00pm Speaker start
    - 7:00pm Jobs & Hiring Announcements
    - group chit-chat/networking

    4
  • Mike Rogers on Seeding Data in Ruby on Rails

    Online event

    Abstract
    Good seeds can make the development experience a joy, bad seeds can make it a nightmare. Let's explore the options available to us, along with a few tricks to help quickly make a codebase more enjoyable.

    We're going to go through the following:

    What are seeds
    Horror stories where good seeds could have saved the day
    Approaches to seeding
    Testing your new seeds

    Bio
    Mike Rogers is a Ruby Developer originally from the UK, who currently lives in the USA. He has a passion for SSR applications & has specialized on using Rails for almost 10 years.

    Agenda
    (all in Eastern Time zone)
    - 5:30pm Meeting start, welcome
    - 5:40pm First time attendees introductions, ice breaker
    - 6:00pm Speaker start
    - 7:00pm Jobs & Hiring Announcements

    2
  • NYC.rb Event

    Online event

  • Panel Discussion 2 - Sandi Metz's Practical Object-Oriented Design in Ruby

    NYC.rb is pleased to have another panel discussion on Sandi Metz's Practical Object-Oriented Design, An Agile Primer Using Ruby, POODR for short.

    This time, we will focus on perspectives of those further along in their programming journey. Panelists will bring a wide range of experience, with members including at least one book author, a senior software engineer, an engineering manager, and a software consulting firm CEO. Their names are below, and it’s just up to you to categorize each according to what they have accomplished!

    Panelists
    - Sandi Metz
    - Joe Leo
    - Justin Schulz
    - Li-Hsuan Lung

    We would like this to be an interactive session where audience members ask questions to panelists on their learnings and take-aways from reading POODR. You can also add your questions beforehand on this retro board:

    https://bit.ly/nycrb-retro

    If you want to get the book before hand, you can buy it here:

    https://poodr.com

    Panelist Bio:
    - Sandi Metz - “I'm Sandi and I'm a programmer. I'm also a teacher, author and sometime consultant, but I teach, write and consult about programming so it all starts here. In the past 30+ years I have written innumerable applications, a surprising number of which are still running today. Dealing with long lived applications has left me deeply biased towards creating practical solutions that produce working software that is easy to change.
    I believe in simplicity. I strive for simple code and straightforward explanations, and while I won't claim I always succeed, my work is improved by the humble attempt. The fact that yesterday's ideas seem imperfect today gives me confidence that I'm still learning; it's a great pleasure to share this knowledge with you.”
    - Joe Leo is the founder and CEO of Def Method. He combines his engineering experience, business acumen, and proclivity for challenges to his leadership practice. Before founding DM, Joe worked with teams of every size and configuration to deliver high-quality software solutions across government, education, finance, and e-commerce. With a love of service and a commitment to his clients’ success, Joe enjoys discussing technical team management, implementing process improvements, and rescuing wayward software projects. Outside of work, he loves going on “adventures” with his five-year-old daughter, Lucy, and experiencing everything New York City has to offer.
    - Justin Schulz is a passionate agilist who has worked most recently as a lead consulting software developer with Stride Consulting. During that time, he worked with a wide range of teams from smaller organizations to large tech companies like IBM and Spotify. In addition to his professional work, he volunteers with the Code Nation organization, teaching coding skills to underrepresented groups in tech at New York City public high schools. He is currently taking a sabbatical to work on personal projects and find a way to use his skills to help the world.
    - Li-Hsuan Lung has pursued the craft of delivering quality software at a sustainable pace for over a decade. In addition to writing software, Li-Hsuan provides agile coaching, management consulting, and technical excellence training to teams, as well as mentorship to newly minted software developers. Li-Hsuan is currently an Engineering Manager at Fieldwire.

    MINSWAN
    Looking for other Ruby Meetups to attend? Check out an awesome project from community member: Meghan Gutshall
    https://ruby-meetup-calendar.mikerogers.io/

    Agenda
    (all in Eastern Time zone)
    - 5:30pm Meeting start, welcome
    - 5:40pm Panel start
    - 7:00pm Jobs & Hiring Announcements
    - chit chat/networking

    5
  • Panel Discussion - Sandi Metz's Practical Object-Oriented Design in Ruby

    NYC.rb will have a panel discussion on Sandi Metz's Practical Object-Oriented Design, An Agile Primer Using Ruby, POODR for short. This book is essential for any new programmers in Ruby and object-oriented programming in general.

    This time, we aim to offer perspectives for those who are earlier in their programming journey. The panelists will share their thoughts about how the concepts from readings of POODR have improved their code creation and will focus on specific topics.

    Our panelists this time will be:

    - Ezra Shimon - Ezra-Shimon Rosenfeld recently started his first Ruby on Rails job at CoverMyMeds. Prior to starting at CoverMyMeds, Ezra-Shimon spent four years doing web development using Java. Follow him on Twitter (@ezra_shimon) where he tweets once every four years or so.

    - JJ Seymour - JJ Seymour is a Software Engineer for advertising group Epsilon. He works with Ruby on Rails and Angular daily. Years prior he worked as an assistant instructor at The Flatiron School after graduating from the course.

    - Joe Leo - Joe is the founder and CEO of Def Method. He combines his engineering experience, business acumen, and proclivity for challenges to his leadership practice.

    - Oscar Romero - Oscar Romero is currently learning Full Stack Fundamentals with a Ruby focus at LaunchShoool.com. Prior to transitioning into tech he worked in the biopharma industry at AstraZeneca and Eli Lilly making medicine.

    Topics we will focus on:

    - Recognition that objects should be isolated and the messages between them should be responsible for the updating data
    - Managing dependencies
    - Comparison of POODR to a number of books that came before and around the date of POODR’s

    We would like this to be an interactive session where audience members ask questions to panelists on their learnings and take-aways from reading POODR. You can also add your questions beforehand on this retro board:

    https://bit.ly/nycrb-retro

    If you want to get the book before hand, you can buy it here:

    https://poodr.com

    Agenda
    (all in Eastern Time zone)
    - 5:30pm Meeting start, welcome
    - 5:40pm First time attendees introductions, ice breaker
    - 6:00pm Panel start
    - 7:00pm Jobs & Hiring Announcements

    1
  • NYC.rb Event

    Online event

    1
  • Panel Discussion: 97 Things Every Programmer Should Know

    We invite three experienced developers and engineering leaders from to share their top two most important things they should know from the book: 97 Things Every Programmer Should Know book

    https://97-things-every-x-should-know.gitbooks.io/97-things-every-programmer-should-know/content/en/index.html

    We want this to be an interactive session where we would like you to ask panelists questions on the most important things every programmer should know!

    Panelists
    - Arjun Anand is the VP of Engineering at BeenVerified.com now Lifetime Value Co. which develops technology to make public records easy, affordable, and accessible to everyone. He has been in the startup world in NYC for the last 10 years in everything from early to late stage companies. Arjun also is a member of the SEED-Stage VC firm Primary Venture Partners' "Primary Expert Network" supporting founders through key operating challenges. Arjun has worked with Google, American Express, and was an early employee of Crowdtap, which he helped grow from a 4 person startup to an over 100 person successful startup in NYC. When he isn't actively working to grow his managers and developers at his day job, he enjoys mentoring new entrepreneurs, teaching and meeting with folks in the tech industry.
    - Dan Dela Rosa is a Ruby on Rails and Angular senior developer working for the advertising group Epsilon. In a past life, he was the lead iOS engineer at a startup called Makr, named Best of 2014 by Apple, nominated for a Webby Award, and purchased by Staples. Dan contributed to an assortment of mobile apps, including Martha Stewart CraftStudio and The Oregon Trail: American Settler.
    - Steven Solomon is a Lead Software Engineer, and Manager, at Stride Consulting in NYC. He has been writing software professionally since 2007, and has used several programming languages across many different business sectors. Steven is passionate about writing great software using techniques based on Extreme Programming (a flavor of agile), including test-driven development, pair programming, and the sustainable delivery of working software.

    Panel Discussion focus:
    - "Code in the Language of the Domain"
    - “Code is Design”
    - “Code Reviews”
    - "The Golden Rule of API Design".
    - "The Single Responsibility Principle"
    - "Write Tests for People"

    Retroboard for any questions before the meeting:

    http://bit.ly/nycrb-retro

    Agenda
    (all in Eastern Time zone)
    - 5:30pm Meeting start, welcome
    - 5:40pm First time attendees introductions, ice breaker
    - 6:00pm Panel start
    - 7:00pm Jobs & Hiring Announcements

  • Debug Hard: Ruby String Library Methods and Underlying C Implementations

    What if the Ruby String library ‘reverse’ method or its underlying C implementation had a bug? What if it produced unexpected results with certain types of inputs? e.g. strings with unicode characters. How would you catch and fix such a bug? How would you explain the unexpected results?

    Description

    1. Relevance

    The Ruby String library ‘reverse’ method is implemented in C. The debugging tools in this talk apply to Ruby programs, and help provide useful insights into the underlying C implementation.

    2. Novelty and Originality

    The ‘use unicode_normalize to address certain string reversal issues’ appears to be known to certain developers. The novel idea in this talk is the analysis of Ruby and C implementation to explain the problem and possible solutions.

    3. Knowledge

    Vishal started his career at Lucent Technologies (Bell Labs Innovations), where he used C/C++ to develop software for CDMA wireless communication systems. At The Boeing Company, he used Ruby/Rails to develop U.S. government intelligence community software. Vishal enjoys going to the beach and loves family vacations.

    GitHub: https://github.com/vchandnani
    LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/vchandnani/

    4. Coverage

    This talk presents a step-by-step approach to debugging Ruby programs by diving into their underlying C implementation. It uses a string with unicode characters to demonstrate the problem and provides insights into the reversal process by understanding their byte-level representation.

    5. Organization

    This talk starts with a high-level view of the Ruby String library ‘reverse’ method implementation. It introduces the idea of using a Virtual Machine (VM) to build Ruby from source. We learn about the Unicode standard and encoding fundamental principles. We explore the ‘unicode_normalize’ implementation and how it addresses ‘reverse’ method problems. Along the way, we use commands/tools like grep, chars, code_points, each_byte, printf and gdb to provide insight into Ruby library methods.

    6. Bottom Line

    This talk aims to improve confidence in understanding bugs and/or unexpected results in the current application language (e.g. Ruby) as well as the underlying (e.g. C) implementations. I hope to inspire the Ruby community to explore the internals of Ruby strings and provide recommendations for further exploration.

    Agenda
    (all in Eastern Time zone)
    - 5:30 Meeting start, welcome
    - 5:40 First time attendees introductions, ice breaker
    - 6:00 Speaker start
    - 7:00 Jobs & Hiring Announcements

    8
  • Soutaro Matsumoto - An Introduction to Static Typing in Ruby 3

    Abstract
    Performance, concurrency, and static typing are the three key features of Ruby 3. This talk will cover the static typing of Ruby 3: how the new feature looks like and how it improves your Ruby programming experience.

    Detail
    The static typing for Ruby 3 is a complicated topic. The plan had changed from the first announcement by Matz in 2016. There are many projects to cover various areas and have different goals.

    RBS is the standard language for describing types of Ruby programs. TypeProf and Steep are tools based on RBS to statically analyze Ruby programs. There are more tools including rbs_protobuf and rbs_rails, which generate RBS files from applications. Sorbet is another static type checker for Ruby.

    The talk will introduce each of them and help you to pick the best solution for your projects.

    Bio
    Soutaro is a lead Ruby engineer at Square working on static typing for Ruby. He is a core Ruby committer who designed and implemented RBS for Ruby 3. He also develops Steep, a static type checker for Ruby.

    3
  • Heidi Waterhouse on MirrorWorld

    Online event

    Abstract
    This year has felt like we fell into a strange land, full of new rules, new dangers, things the wrong size. But unlike Alice on her trip through the looking glass, we have company, and we have community.

    Details
    This talk is for anyone who feels alone, sitting in front of a monitor, with a mask hung on the door to the outside. Technology can't solve all our problems, and we shouldn't try, but the collective action of aligned communities can change the world. What has our community done, and what can we work on doing next? Where should we spend our resources, and how should we agree on priorities? What is investing in our present and what is for our future?

    We have to remember that we cannot stand still — not technologically, not emotionally, not politically. The world will keep moving. Feeling like our lives are on pause because of chaos in the world is an illusion — things keep happening even if we’re not outside to see them.

    You're going to leave with some ideas of where to start organizing, what to start doing, how to break your doomscrolling into something that improves the world.

    Bio
    Heidi is a transformation advocate with LaunchDarkly. She delights in working at the intersection of usability, risk reduction, and cutting-edge technology. One of her favorite hobbies is talking to developers about things they already knew but had never thought of that way before. She sews all her conference dresses so that she's sure there is a pocket for the mic.