Mobile Privacy Panel

This is a past event

125 people went

Location image of event venue

Details

Mobile privacy is a confusing landscape with policy struggling to keep up with rapid innovation and often creating broad laws as a tool to manage the unknown. This creates a challenging environment for startups and technologists. What do mobile developers need to know about privacy policy? What are the dangers and how can we avoid them? What is the current state of legislation and how is it likely to change over the next year? What can startups to do avoid conflict while still pushing the boundaries of mobile innovation?

Albert Wenger (http://continuations.com/) is a partner at Union Square Ventures (http://www.usv.com/), many of whose portfolio companies must deal with mobile privacy policy in their technology and business models. Albert combines over ten years of entrepreneurial experience with an in-depth background in technology. Morgan Reed (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/morgan-reed) is the Executive Director of Association for Competitive Technology (http://actonline.org/) in Washington DC and an expert on the intersection of technology and government. ACT is an international grassroots advocacy group representing thousands of app developers and information technology firms. Colin O'Malley leads the policy and strategy teams at Evidon (http://www.evidon.com/). Evidon was selected by the Digital Advertising Alliance to power its Self-Regulatory Program for Online Behavioral Advertising. Evidon will soon be launching its mobile platform. Bob Walczak is a partner at Bump Equity. He was formerly CEO/Founder of Ringleader, a company that raised over $18million during it's 6+ year lifespan, Ringleader was targeted in a mobile privacy lawsuit that quickly shut down the company. The panel will be moderated by Marvin Ammori (http://ammori.org/) who is an expert in internet and cybersecurity law. For the past five years, he has been the leading lawyer nationally on the issue of network neutrality, litigating several important network neutrality cases. He's been a visiting scholar at Stanford Law School's Center for Internet & Society and serves as a legal fellow with the New America Foundation Open Technology Initiative.