What we're about

Do you love reading about food as much as you love eating it? Join our book group for foodies! Each month we will read a different food related book, and discuss it over a potluck made from recipes from, or inspired by, the reading. Our meeting is usually the 2nd Wednesday of the month in Mountlake Terrace.

Who we are:
Once a library program, we've come together over a shared interest in food and books. Breaking bread over dinner monthly for almost 9 years, we're still going strong. We welcome newcomers warmly, always excited to hear new points of view and taste new recipes. The group consists of a range of cooking skills, from the occasional to the obsessive, so don't be intimidated - it's low pressure. There are usually 6 to 12 attendees at a meeting. Feel free to suggest books or ideas, or ask questions about meetings or the group, in the discussion area, or you can message me (Katie Sherrill) if you prefer.

Upcoming events (5)

Potluck & Book Discussion - Slice Harvester by Colin Atrophy Hagendorf

TBD - Mountlake Terrace/Edmonds

What we'll do: We'll discuss Colin Atrophy Hagendorf's "Slice Harvester: A Memoir in Pizza" over a potluck pizza dinner. Everyone will pick a dish, either store bought or homemade pizza, or a related recipe inspired by the reading. Who doesn't love pizza? About the book: When a twenty-something punk rocker eats a cheese slice from every pizzeria in New York City over the course of two years, he also gets sober, falls in love, and starts a blog. He is the Slice Harvester, and “everyone has something to gain from this tale of blackouts, almost burning out, and too-burned crusts” (Newsweek). One of NPR’s Best Books of 2015, Slice Harvester “stands out from the pack…wry, witty, surprisingly insightful. Hagendorf veers from the profane to the profound in the same sentence…about chasing ideals, romantic as well as culinary, and how that can be both noble and annihilating” (NPR Books). Who we are: Once a library program, we've come together over a shared interest in food and books. Breaking bread over dinner monthly for almost 9 years, we're still going strong. We welcome newcomers warmly, always excited to hear new points of view and taste new recipes. The group consists of a range of cooking skills, from the occasional to the obsessive, so don't be intimidated - it's low pressure. There are usually 6 to 12 attendees at a meeting. Don't hesitate to message me (Katie Sherrill) if you have any questions about the group.

Potluck & Book Discussion - What She Ate by Laura Shapiro

What we'll do: We'll discuss Laura Shapiro's "What She Ate" over a potluck inspired by the book. Everyone will pick a dish, either a recipe from the book or something inspired by the reading, to share. Who we are: Once a library program, we've come together over a shared interest in food and books. Breaking bread over dinner monthly for almost 9 years, we're still going strong. We welcome newcomers warmly, always excited to hear new points of view and taste new recipes. The group consists of a range of cooking skills, from the occasional to the obsessive, so don't be intimidated - it's low pressure. There are usually 6 to 12 attendees at a meeting. Don't hesitate to message me (Katie Sherrill) if you have any questions about the group. About the Book: What She Ate by Laura Shapiro: Each of the six women in this entertaining group portrait was famous in her time, and most are still famous in ours; but until now, nobody has told their lives from the point of view of the kitchen and the table. Dorothy Wordsworth, whose food story transforms our picture of the life she shared with her famous poet brother Rosa Lewis, the Edwardian-era Cockney caterer who cooked her way up the social ladder Eleanor Roosevelt, First Lady and rigorous protector of the worst cook in White House history Eva Braun, Hitler’s mistress, who challenges our warm associations of food, family, and table Barbara Pym, whose witty books upend a host of stereotypes about postwar British cuisine Helen Gurley Brown, the editor of Cosmopolitan, whose commitment to “having it all” meant having almost nothing on the plate except a supersized portion of diet gelatin.

Number One Chinese Restaurant by Lillian Li Potluck & Discussion

What we'll do: We'll discuss Lillian Li's "Number One Chinese Restaurant" over a potluck inspired by the book. Everyone will pick a dish, either a recipe from the book or something inspired by the reading, to share. Who we are: Once a library program, we've come together over a shared interest in food and books. Breaking bread over dinner monthly for almost 9 years, we're still going strong. We welcome newcomers warmly, always excited to hear new points of view and taste new recipes. The group consists of a range of cooking skills, from the occasional to the obsessive, so don't be intimidated - it's low pressure. There are usually 6 to 12 attendees at a meeting. Don't hesitate to message me (Katie Sherrill) if you have any questions about the group. About the Book: The Beijing Duck House in Rockville, Maryland, is not only a beloved go-to setting for hunger pangs and celebrations; it is its own world, inhabited by waiters and kitchen staff who have been fighting, loving, and aging within its walls for decades. When disaster strikes, this working family’s controlled chaos is set loose, forcing each character to confront the conflicts that fast-paced restaurant life has kept at bay.

Potluck - Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in America by Barbara Ehrenreich

What we'll do: We'll discuss "Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in America" by Barbara Ehrenreich over a potluck inspired by the book. Everyone will pick a dish, either a recipe from the book or something inspired by the reading, to share. It should be a good discussion and interesting potluck. We'll either do food directly from the reading, or our best budget recipes. Who we are: Once a library program, we've come together over a shared interest in food and books. Breaking bread over dinner monthly for almost 9 years, we're still going strong. We welcome newcomers warmly, always excited to hear new points of view and taste new recipes. The group consists of a range of cooking skills, from the occasional to the obsessive, so don't be intimidated - it's low pressure. There are usually 6 to 12 attendees at a meeting. Don't hesitate to message me (Katie Sherrill) if you have any questions about the group. About the book: Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in America by Barbara Ehrenreich Millions of Americans work full-time, year-round, for poverty-level wages. In 1998, Barbara Ehrenreich decided to join them. She was inspired in part by the rhetoric surrounding welfare reform, which promised that any job equals a better life. But how can anyone survive, let alone prosper, on $6-$7 an hour? To find out, Ehrenreich moved from Florida to Maine to Minnesota, taking the cheapest lodgings available and accepting work as a waitress, hotel maid, house cleaner, nursing home aide, and Wal-Mart salesperson. She soon discovered that even the "lowliest" occupations require exhausting mental and physical efforts. And one job is not enough; you need at least two if you intend to live indoors. Nickel and Dimed reveals low-wage America in all its tenacity, anxiety, and surprising generosity--a land of Big Boxes, fast food, and a thousand desperate stratagems for survival. Instantly acclaimed for its insight, humor, and passion, this book is changing the way America perceives its working poor

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