What we're about

Join us to read and discuss classic literature. We will read great works that have changed the face of writing, influenced society and endured the test of time. Past authors we have read include, among others, Cervantes, James, Kawabata, Morrison, Flaubert, Austen, Waugh, Dickens, Wilde, Nabokov, Hemingway, Shakespeare and Homer. We meet once a month in the home of one of our members.

Book selections for each meeting are made at the prior meeting. The only exception is when we choose a book two months out to allow for a longer book. Each person at the meeting throws out suggestions and we discuss until we reach something resembling consensus. It can be messy, but the process keeps long-standing members invested. I also believe that our selections are varied enough that we attract a variety of new people.

We are a diverse group who is always looking for new perspectives.

If you are curious about what we have read, there is a file containing a nearly complete list of our past meetings uploaded under files.

Upcoming events (2)

The Ginger Man by J.P. Donleavy

Online event

First published in Paris in 1955, and originally banned in the United States, J. P. Donleavy’s first novel is now recognized the world over as a masterpiece and a modern classic of the highest order. Set in Ireland just after World War II, The Ginger Man is J. P. Donleavy’s wildly funny, picaresque classic novel of the misadventures of Sebastian Dangerfield, a young American ne’er-do-well studying at Trinity College in Dublin. He barely has time for his studies and avoids bill collectors, makes love to almost anything in a skirt, and tries to survive without having to descend into the bottomless pit of steady work. Dangerfield’s appetite for women, liquor, and general roguishness is insatiable—and he satisfies it with endless charm. -- Grove Press

Nightwood by Djuna Barnes

Online event

Nightwood, Djuna Barnes' strange and sinuous tour de force, "belongs to that small class of books that somehow reflect a time or an epoch" (Times Literary Supplement). That time is the period between the two World Wars, and Barnes' novel unfolds in the decadent shadows of Europe's great cities, Paris, Berlin, and Vienna―a world in which the boundaries of class, religion, and sexuality are bold but surprisingly porous. The outsized characters who inhabit this world are some of the most memorable in all of fiction―there is Guido Volkbein, the Wandering Jew and son of a self-proclaimed baron; Robin Vote, the American expatriate who marries him and then engages in a series of affairs, first with Nora Flood and then with Jenny Petherbridge, driving all of her lovers to distraction with her passion for wandering alone in the night; and there is Dr. Matthew-Mighty-Grain-of-Salt-Dante-O'Connor, a transvestite and ostensible gynecologist, whose digressive speeches brim with fury, keen insights, and surprising allusions. Barnes' depiction of these characters and their relationships (Nora says, "A man is another persona woman is yourself, caught as you turn in panic; on her mouth you kiss your own") has made the novel a landmark of feminist and lesbian literature. Most striking of all is Barnes' unparalleled stylistic innovation, which led T. S. Eliot to proclaim the book "so good a novel that only sensibilities trained on poetry can wholly appreciate it." --New Directions Edition

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