What we're about

Profs and Pints (https://www.profsandpints.com) brings professors and other college instructors into bars, cafes, and other venues to give fascinating talks or to conduct instructive workshops. They cover a wide range of subjects, including history, politics, popular culture, horticulture, literature, creative writing, and personal finance. Anyone interested in learning and in meeting people with similar interests should join. Lectures are structured to allow at least a half hour for questions and an additional hour for audience members to meet each other. Admission to Profs and Pints events requires the purchase of tickets, either in advance (through the Brown Paper Tickets link provided in event descriptions) or at the door to the venue. Many events sell out in advance, and tickets for Cambria Hotel talks can be purchased only online and in advance. Your indication on Meetup of your intent to attend an event constitutes neither a reservation nor payment for that event.

Although Profs and Pints has a social mission--expanding access to higher learning while offering college instructors a new income source--it is NOT a 501c3. It was established as a for-profit company in hopes that, by developing a profitable business model, it would be able to spread to other communities much more quickly than a nonprofit dependent on philanthropic support. That said, it is welcoming contributions (separate from any ticket purchases) to help cover its advertising costs as it seeks to build up audiences large enough to sustain itself in metro Washington DC and, potentially, other cities. All money contributed to this group will be spent on advertising and promotion to reach larger audiences.

Thank you for your interest in Profs and Pints.

Regards,

Peter Schmidt

Upcoming events (3)

Profs & Pints DC: Women and the French Revolution

The Bier Baron Tavern

Profs and Pints presents: “Women and the French Revolution,” a look at feminism's role and rise in France’s transformative conflict, with Amy Leonard, associate professor of history at Georgetown University.

[Advance tickets: $12 plus sales tax and vendor fees. Available at profsandpints.ticketleap.com/versailles . The Bier Baron, where this talk is being held, will ask for proof of vaccination at the door and require those who do not have it to wear a mask that protects against coronavirus transmission. It will be requiring ticketed event attendees to purchase a minimum of two items, which can be food or beverages, including soft drinks.]

Historians generally trace the beginnings of modern feminism to the French Revolution, when activists inspired by the calls for liberty and equality pushed also for the inclusion of women. Come learn in detail how that conflict was shaped by women and feminism and would influence feminist thought in the centuries to come.

We’ll start by tracing the early stirrings and evolution of feminist thought, looking at early proto-feminist Renaissance writers such as Christine de Pizan and the querelle des femmes (“The Woman Question”), the literary debate about the status of women that began about 1500. Then we’ll focus on the French Revolution as a watershed event, not only for women and feminism but for political and social rights in general.

Turning our attention to the streets and barricades, we’ll look at Charlotte Corday, who murdered Revolutionary leader Jean-Paul Marat because she felt he was becoming too radical, and the march on Versailles by lower-class women who dragged the king and queen back to Paris for trial. On a loftier level, we’ll look at the activists, such as Mary Wollstonecraft and the Marquis de Condorcet, who spoke directly and eloquently about the political, social, end economic enfranchisement of women. Among them, Olympe de Gouges responded to the 1789 Declaration of the Rights of Man with her own 1791 Declaration of the Rights of Woman, where she asked: “Man, are you capable of being fair? A woman is asking: at least you will allow her that right. Tell me? What gave you the sovereign right to oppress my sex?”

We’ll also look female-run salons and “Enlightened” sexism, the sexualization and demonization of Marie Antoinette, and the role of race, class, gender, and religion in determining equality and liberty. Viva las education! (Doors: $15, or $13 with a student ID. Listed time is for doors. Talk starts 30 minutes later. Please allow yourself time to place any orders and get seated and settled in.)

Profs & Pints DC: How the Brain Creates

Church Hall

Profs & Pints presents: “How the Brain Creates,” a look at scientific research on the human brain’s capacity for inspiration, with Dr. Daniel Z. Lieberman, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at George Washington University and co-author of The Molecule of More.

(Advance tickets: $12, plus sales tax and vendor fees. Available at profsandpints.ticketleap.com/creativity . Church Hall, where this event is being staged, follows all C.D.C. and Washington D.C. guidelines regarding public health. Guests who are not fully vaccinated against COVID-19 should continue to wear masks. The venue reserves the right to modify all rules to align with current and future regulations and best practices to maintain a safe and fun environment. In addition to bar service, it provides contactless ordering and hand sanitizer at all tables.)

Creative ideas seem to come out of nowhere, often popping into our heads, fully formed, with no apparent work being done on our part. Sometimes creative ideas solve simple problems, other times they revolutionize an industry. Are they divine inspiration? The influence of a friendly muse? Or are they manufactured by hidden circuits within the brain that we’re ordinarily unaware of?

Come learn what neuroscience tells us about the creative process from Dr. Lieberman, who previously gave fantastic Profs and Pints talks on brain chemistry and politics based on his book The Molecule of More: How a Single Chemical in Your Brain Drives Love, Sex, and Creativity―and Will Determine the Fate of the Human Race. In this talk he will review five strategies for activating creative parts of the brain, with illustrations from ancient history and modern life.

Our modern economy is no longer based on natural resources or physical labor. It’s based on ideas. Understanding creativity—what it is, where it comes from, and how to stimulate it—gives us the key to understanding progress in the 21st century.

Whether the next creative task in front of you involves coming up with a strategic plan, writing a book, or simply doodling, you'll leave this talk with a much better understanding of how your brain will rise to the challenge. You might even find yourself better at such tasks than you had been before.

(Doors: $15, or $13 with a student ID. Listed time is for doors. Talk starts 30 minutes later. Please allow yourself time to place any orders and get seated and settled in.)

Profs & Pints DC: The Psychology of Conspiracy Theories

Profs and Pints presents: “The Psychology of Conspiracy Theories,” with Brian A. Sharpless, licensed clinical psychologist, visiting research fellow at Goldsmiths, University of London, and editor of Unusual Psychological Disorders.

(Advance tickets: $12 plus sales tax and vendor fees. Available at profsandpints.ticketleap.com/conspiracies . Church Hall, where this event is being staged, follows all C.D.C. and Washington D.C. guidelines regarding public health. Guests who are not fully vaccinated against COVID-19 should continue to wear masks. The venue reserves the right to modify all rules to align with current and future regulations and best practices to maintain a safe and fun environment. In addition to bar service, it provides contactless ordering and hand sanitizer at all tables.)

What is a conspiracy theory? Are people who believe in conspiracies fundamentally different from those who do not? Are there any ways to protect yourself from buying into false theories? How often do conspiracy theories actually turn out to be true?

These are just a few of the fascinating questions that will tackled by Brian Sharpless, a regular on the Profs and Pints stage. He will discuss conspiratorial thinking throughout history, define what "conspiracy theory” means to psychologists and psychiatrists, and summarize what the field knows about the people who buy into such beliefs.

You may be surprised to learn that there are ways to predict who will believe in conspiracy theories, with some very common “cognitive biases” leaving people more accepting of them. Conspiracy theories also can also provide short-term psychological benefits to the believer. Furthermore, a number of psychological traits and disorders – both common and rare – have been associated with conspiratorial thinking.

Perhaps most surprising, that there are relatively few big differences between those who are predisposed to believe in conspiracy theories and those who aren't. It's small differences that sometimes have a huge impact in worldview.

The good news is that there are ways to evaluate – and even “inoculate” yourself against – conspiracy theories, and Dr. Sharpless will offer you practical tips on this front. You may walk out with a different perspective on what you read in the news and on the internet, with new knowledge that may help you maintain a more realistic and accurate worldview. ( Doors: $15, or $13 with a student ID. Listed time is for doors. Talk starts 30 minutes later. Please allow yourself time to place any orders and get seated and settled in.)

Photos (494)