What we're about

We will meet and discuss various topics on theology and moral Greek/Stoic philosophy, gaining wisdom from studying the classic Greek/Roman moral philosophers, the Eastern and Western Church Fathers, and Christian history regarding the Council of Trent, Vatican II, World War II years, and also studying the Catholic Catechism.

In this group we will assume that all Christians, whether they be Catholic, Orthodox, or Protestant, have all been saved. Unless we choose one of these as a topic to discuss, we want to avoid polemic debates on topics like venerating the Virgin Mary and the saints, evolution, purgatory, and other divisive topics. Rather, we prefer to discuss topics that will increase in us our Love of God and love of our neighbor.

We do not believe that Trump is the Chosen One from God, and we believe that comparing Trump to King Cyrus is an insult to King Cyrus the Great. We agree with a recent Christianity Today editorial:

https://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/2019/december-web-only/trump-should-be-removed-from-office.html

This is our blog from where we will draw our topics. Please feel free to suggest topics to discuss.

http://www.seekingvirtueandwisdom.com/

We have also started a YouTube Channel named: Reflections on Morality, Philosophy & History

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCLqDkfFbWhXOnzdjp__YZtg

Upcoming events (4+)

Discussions on Apostolic and Eastern Church Fathers, Decalogue, Philokalia

We will review the writings of the Apostolic Church Fathers in the second and third generations after the life of Christ, and also the writings of the Eastern Church Fathers in the Philokalia, the Desert Fathers, and the teachings of St John Climacus in the Ladder of Divine Ascent. These writings also deeply influenced the Western monastics, including St John Cassian and St Benedict of Nursia.

We will review the teachings in the Catholic Catechism on the Ten Commandments, plus we will read the writings of both the Eastern and Western Church Fathers referenced by the Catechism, and also other writings by rabbis, commentators, and preachers that discuss the Decalogue.

The Philokalia is a collection of the writings of the Eastern Church Fathers beloved by the Orthodox but little known by many Catholics and Protestants. When reading the works of the Roman Stoic philosophers, I was struck by the commonalities between the stoic writings and the Philokalia, the shared lists of virtues and vices as well as the terminology, which made it clear that many of the writers in the Philokalia were drawing from Greco-Roman moral philosophy.

In their introduction, the translators tell us the meaning of the Philokalia. “Philokalia itself means love of the beautiful, the exalted, the excellent, understood as the transcendent source of life and the revelation of Truth.” “The Philokalia is an itinerary through the labyrinth of time, a silent way of love and gnosis through the deserts and emptiness of modern life, a vivifying and fadeless experience.” The Philokalia is a “summons to man to overcome his ignorance, to uncover the knowledge that lies within, to rid himself of illusion, and to be receptive to the grace of the Holy Spirit who teaches all things and brings all things to remembrance.”

The Ladder of Divine Ascent was written in the seventh century by John Climacus, an abbot of St. Katherine’s Monastery at the foot of Mt. Sinai in the deserts of Egypt, which still houses monks to this very day. He was asked to write a guidebook for beginning monks on how to live the monastic life.

Do not think that just because you are not a monastic that you cannot climb the Ladder of Divine Ascent. Leading a godly life, leading a Christian life, is a monastic calling, whether you decide to become a monk or nun or not. Marriage, work, career, school, child rearing, these are all monastic callings. If you think only of yourself and your selfish pleasures of the moment, you cannot successfully climb any of these ladders.
Most discussions will be derived from blogs:
http://www.seekingvirtueandwisdom.com
Purchase from Amazon:
John Climacus: The Ladder of Divine Ascent (Classics of Western Spirituality)
https://amzn.to/3jMLomA
John Climacus: The Ladder of Divine Ascent, Blue Hardcover
https://amzn.to/3iLgPyl
The Philokalia: The Complete Text (Vol. 1)
https://amzn.to/3eCtqBo
The Philokalia: A Classic Text of Orthodox Spirituality, Essays
https://amzn.to/2V1dhhQ
Early Christian Writings, The Apostolic Fathers
Penguin Classic, introduction by Andrew Louth
https://amzn.to/2V84r1S
Blogs have more books available.

This online discussion is a practice session for future YouTube videos. Questions, suggestions, participation, and input are welcome!
Please subscribe to my YouTube Channel, Reflections on Morality, Philosophy, and History: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCLqDkfFbWhXOnzdjp__YZtg

If you wish to login by phone, or see the more detailed ZOOM links, please see the August 21st, 11 AM meetup.

Discussions on Apostolic and Eastern Church Fathers, Decalogue, Philokalia

We will review the writings of the Apostolic Church Fathers in the second and third generations after the life of Christ, and also the writings of the Eastern Church Fathers in the Philokalia, the Desert Fathers, and the teachings of St John Climacus in the Ladder of Divine Ascent. These writings also deeply influenced the Western monastics, including St John Cassian and St Benedict of Nursia.

We will review the teachings in the Catholic Catechism on the Ten Commandments, plus we will read the writings of both the Eastern and Western Church Fathers referenced by the Catechism, and also other writings by rabbis, commentators, and preachers that discuss the Decalogue.

The Philokalia is a collection of the writings of the Eastern Church Fathers beloved by the Orthodox but little known by many Catholics and Protestants. When reading the works of the Roman Stoic philosophers, I was struck by the commonalities between the stoic writings and the Philokalia, the shared lists of virtues and vices as well as the terminology, which made it clear that many of the writers in the Philokalia were drawing from Greco-Roman moral philosophy.

In their introduction, the translators tell us the meaning of the Philokalia. “Philokalia itself means love of the beautiful, the exalted, the excellent, understood as the transcendent source of life and the revelation of Truth.” “The Philokalia is an itinerary through the labyrinth of time, a silent way of love and gnosis through the deserts and emptiness of modern life, a vivifying and fadeless experience.” The Philokalia is a “summons to man to overcome his ignorance, to uncover the knowledge that lies within, to rid himself of illusion, and to be receptive to the grace of the Holy Spirit who teaches all things and brings all things to remembrance.”

The Ladder of Divine Ascent was written in the seventh century by John Climacus, an abbot of St. Katherine’s Monastery at the foot of Mt. Sinai in the deserts of Egypt, which still houses monks to this very day. He was asked to write a guidebook for beginning monks on how to live the monastic life.

Do not think that just because you are not a monastic that you cannot climb the Ladder of Divine Ascent. Leading a godly life, leading a Christian life, is a monastic calling, whether you decide to become a monk or nun or not. Marriage, work, career, school, child rearing, these are all monastic callings. If you think only of yourself and your selfish pleasures of the moment, you cannot successfully climb any of these ladders.
Most discussions will be derived from blogs:
http://www.seekingvirtueandwisdom.com
Purchase from Amazon:
John Climacus: The Ladder of Divine Ascent (Classics of Western Spirituality)
https://amzn.to/3jMLomA
John Climacus: The Ladder of Divine Ascent, Blue Hardcover
https://amzn.to/3iLgPyl
The Philokalia: The Complete Text (Vol. 1)
https://amzn.to/3eCtqBo
The Philokalia: A Classic Text of Orthodox Spirituality, Essays
https://amzn.to/2V1dhhQ
Early Christian Writings, The Apostolic Fathers
Penguin Classic, introduction by Andrew Louth
https://amzn.to/2V84r1S
Blogs have more books available.

This online discussion is a practice session for future YouTube videos. Questions, suggestions, participation, and input are welcome!
Please subscribe to my YouTube Channel, Reflections on Morality, Philosophy, and History: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCLqDkfFbWhXOnzdjp__YZtg

If you wish to login by phone, or see the more detailed ZOOM links, please see the August 21st, 11 AM meetup.

Moral Philosophy at Starbucks: IN PERSON

Starbucks

Let us meet in person finally! Please don't be too late, but if you are quite late, please call. We can either talk about general topics, or talk about one of my blogs, or talk about one of my YouTube videos, or go over the PowerPoint scripts for future YouTube videos, whatever you wish to discuss or not.

Please subscribe to my YouTube Channel, Reflections on Morality, Philosophy, and History: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCLqDkfFbWhXOnzdjp__YZtg
My Blog: http://www.seekingvirtueandwisdom.com

Our projects include:
Studying the teachings of the ancient and modern stoic and moral philosophers on how to better lead a godly life.
Studying ancient and modern history to learn moral lessons and learn how we can successfully live a life of faith in trying times, including civil rights and social gospel history.
Studying issues of morality in the Catholic, Orthodox, Protestant and Jewish traditions.
Everyone should join and participate in their local church. However, my internet persona is purposefully obscure so that I can be respectful of all genuine Judeo-Christian traditions, I do not wish to be disrespectfully polemical.

Discussions on Apostolic and Eastern Church Fathers, Decalogue, Philokalia

We will review the writings of the Apostolic Church Fathers in the second and third generations after the life of Christ, and also the writings of the Eastern Church Fathers in the Philokalia, the Desert Fathers, and the teachings of St John Climacus in the Ladder of Divine Ascent. These writings also deeply influenced the Western monastics, including St John Cassian and St Benedict of Nursia.

We will review the teachings in the Catholic Catechism on the Ten Commandments, plus we will read the writings of both the Eastern and Western Church Fathers referenced by the Catechism, and also other writings by rabbis, commentators, and preachers that discuss the Decalogue.

The Philokalia is a collection of the writings of the Eastern Church Fathers beloved by the Orthodox but little known by many Catholics and Protestants. When reading the works of the Roman Stoic philosophers, I was struck by the commonalities between the stoic writings and the Philokalia, the shared lists of virtues and vices as well as the terminology, which made it clear that many of the writers in the Philokalia were drawing from Greco-Roman moral philosophy.

In their introduction, the translators tell us the meaning of the Philokalia. “Philokalia itself means love of the beautiful, the exalted, the excellent, understood as the transcendent source of life and the revelation of Truth.” “The Philokalia is an itinerary through the labyrinth of time, a silent way of love and gnosis through the deserts and emptiness of modern life, a vivifying and fadeless experience.” The Philokalia is a “summons to man to overcome his ignorance, to uncover the knowledge that lies within, to rid himself of illusion, and to be receptive to the grace of the Holy Spirit who teaches all things and brings all things to remembrance.”

The Ladder of Divine Ascent was written in the seventh century by John Climacus, an abbot of St. Katherine’s Monastery at the foot of Mt. Sinai in the deserts of Egypt, which still houses monks to this very day. He was asked to write a guidebook for beginning monks on how to live the monastic life.

Do not think that just because you are not a monastic that you cannot climb the Ladder of Divine Ascent. Leading a godly life, leading a Christian life, is a monastic calling, whether you decide to become a monk or nun or not. Marriage, work, career, school, child rearing, these are all monastic callings. If you think only of yourself and your selfish pleasures of the moment, you cannot successfully climb any of these ladders.
Most discussions will be derived from blogs:
http://www.seekingvirtueandwisdom.com
Purchase from Amazon:
John Climacus: The Ladder of Divine Ascent (Classics of Western Spirituality)
https://amzn.to/3jMLomA
John Climacus: The Ladder of Divine Ascent, Blue Hardcover
https://amzn.to/3iLgPyl
The Philokalia: The Complete Text (Vol. 1)
https://amzn.to/3eCtqBo
The Philokalia: A Classic Text of Orthodox Spirituality, Essays
https://amzn.to/2V1dhhQ
Early Christian Writings, The Apostolic Fathers
Penguin Classic, introduction by Andrew Louth
https://amzn.to/2V84r1S
Blogs have more books available.

This online discussion is a practice session for future YouTube videos. Questions, suggestions, participation, and input are welcome!
Please subscribe to my YouTube Channel, Reflections on Morality, Philosophy, and History: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCLqDkfFbWhXOnzdjp__YZtg

If you wish to login by phone, or see the more detailed ZOOM links, please see the August 21st, 11 AM meetup.

Photos (50)