What we're about

(Background of bugs in jars available from: http://www.etsy.com/people/thephotocube/ )

The Scarabs are an informal group of folks who, for diverse reasons, are interested in insects and/or spiders. We have banded together (perhaps "swarmed" would be a better word) to socialize, exchange views, see interesting programs, and go on field trips with like-minded people.

Real scarabs (a type of beetle) spend their time burying balls of dung. The Scarabs, however, meet once a month, usually for a lecture or presentation, sometimes for a picnic or party. We go on field trips to collect, watch, or photograph the creatures of our choice. We publish a monthly newsletter, "Scarabogram," with news, articles, illustrations, and poetry. We show and tell about our collections and memorabilia. And of course we talk about bugs!

Members range in age from young children to retirees, and in experience from rank beginners to seasoned professional entomologists. Local members, who can attend meetings, are preferred, but others are not turned away. The only requirement is an interest in the subject matter!

All are welcome at our meetings, whether members or not.

Please see our website (http://crawford.tardigrade.net/Scarabs.html) for more information, including dues and instructions on how to join. (Note: Joining here will get you meeting reminders but does not automatically make you an official member. The following website explains how to do that.)

http://crawford.tardigrade.net/Scarabs.html

Upcoming events (2)

Feb. Meeting: Climate Change will Boost Crop Loss to Insects — by Curtis Deutsch

Climate change is one of the biggest issues, if not the biggest, of our time. As the world's mean temperature creeps upwards, nearly everything will be affected — including insects! Our speaker participated in a study recently published in _Science_ that examined the effects on crop pest insects and the crops they eat. "We expect to see increasing crop losses due to insect activity for two basic reasons. First, warmer temperatures increase insect metabolic rates exponentially. Second, with the exception of the tropics, warmer temperatures will increase the reproductive rates of insects. You have more insects, and they’re eating more." And that's not good for crops! So, will we all be getting a little hungry by and by? Do we really want that kind of a world? Forewarned is forearmed! Don't miss this month's meeting of the Scarabs! Curtis Deutsch is an associate professor in the UW's School of Oceanography. His research focuses on the interaction between climate and bio-geo-chemical cycles. This study is one of his few ventures into entomology. He says "No doubt I'll learn as much about insects from you all as you will from me." As always, all are welcome at our meetings, whether members or not. (Dues paying ( http://crawford.tardigrade.net/Scarabs.html ) members get a newsletter by postal mail). RSVP if you want an email reminder. Otherwise, just show up! Click this link ( http://crawford.tardigrade.net/journal/gear/Zoo-CWC-Directions.pdf ) to get a PDF sheet of driving directions for Woodland Park Zoo's "Penguin Parking Lot". Parking will be free (regardless of the sign). The CWC is a small building directly to your right as you enter the Penguin lot.

April Meeting: Archeo-entomology & Prehistoric Life In Oregon - by Martin Adams

Insect remains can reveal a great deal about an archological site. Varying from insects that have no relationship to the humans at the site, to very specific human-insect interactions, the insect remains recovered from an archeological excavation can reveal a wealth of information about the physical environment, vegetation, human subsistence practices, and hygiene. Martin will take most examples from his current project of identifying the thousands of insect fragments from excavations at Paisley Caves, a pre-Clovis (>13,500 year old) rock shelter site in southern Oregon, but he might mention previous projects such as the excavation of the early 19th Century NCO privy at historic Fort Vancouver! We'll also hear about the difficulties of identifying long-buried insect fragments, and how Martin got into this out-of-the-way field. Martin (who has degrees from Portland State and did graduate work at Oregon State) has been studying archeological insect remains for over ten years and has operated Paleoinsect Research, an archeo-entomological consulting firm, since 2013. He has recovered and analyzed insect and arthropod remains from a variety of different archeological sites in the Pacific Northwest, as well as a Mayan site in western Belize. Although he is interested in any archeological insect remains he can find, he is most interested in human and animal ectoparasites and, to aid in that endeavor, consults for several veterinary clinics in the Portland metro area. As always, all are welcome at our meetings, whether members or not. (Dues paying ( http://crawford.tardigrade.net/Scarabs.html ) members get a newsletter by postal mail). RSVP if you want an email reminder. Otherwise, just show up! Click this link ( http://crawford.tardigrade.net/journal/gear/Zoo-CWC-Directions.pdf ) to get a PDF sheet of driving directions for Woodland Park Zoo's "Penguin Parking Lot". Parking will be free (regardless of the sign). The CWC is a small building directly to your right as you enter the Penguin lot.

Past events (61)

Monthly Meeting: Members' Potpourri

Woodland Park Zoo

Photos (102)