What we're about

The Scarabs are an informal group of folks who, for diverse reasons, are interested in insects and/or spiders. We have banded together (perhaps "swarmed" would be a better word) to socialize, exchange views, see interesting programs, and go on field trips with like-minded people.

Real scarabs (a type of beetle) spend their time burying balls of dung. The Scarabs, however, meet once a month, usually for a lecture or presentation, sometimes for a picnic or party. We go on field trips to collect, watch, or photograph the creatures of our choice. We publish a monthly newsletter, "Scarabogram," with news, articles, illustrations, and poetry. We show and tell about our collections and memorabilia. And of course we talk about bugs!

Members range in age from young children to retirees, and in experience from rank beginners to seasoned professional entomologists. Local members, who can attend meetings, are preferred, but others are not turned away. The only requirement is an interest in the subject matter!

All are welcome at our meetings, whether members or not.

Please see our website (http://crawford.tardigrade.net/Scarabs.html) for more information, including dues and instructions on how to join. (Note: Joining here will get you meeting reminders but does not automatically make you an official member. The following website explains how to do that.)

http://crawford.tardigrade.net/Scarabs.html

Upcoming events (2)

Sept. Meeting: Evolution of a Recreational Naturalist — by Dan Nelson

Dan Nelson's website, "10,000 Things of the Pacific Northwest", intends "to find, photograph, identify, and profile at least 10,000 species of the myriad lifeforms to be found in the Pacific Northwest" — ranging from flowers to arthropods. As things have worked out, Dan has documented a lot of bugs on the site, since that's by far the quickest way to get to 10,000 species! Of the latest 20, about half are arthropods or "bugs."

Covering Washington, Oregon, Idaho and some adjacent areas, each species profile (Dan hopes to average more than 1/day) includes photos — and the photos are amazing! Of course they are not in systematic order because they are posted in the order Dan happens to spot, photograph and identify them. But there are also full-fledged blog posts detailing Dan's "journey" as a self-taught naturalist; and that is the story we will hear in the program for Scarabs, copiously illustrated with photos from the species profiles. Dan says: "Since I’m not an entomologist or any other kind of -ologist, and not only are most of your members probably more knowledgeable than I am but most of what I do know is in the species profiles on the website, I figured I’d just talk about how I came to have this website, some of the adventures I’ve had with it, and what I hope to accomplish."

Don't miss this one! And check out the site: http://10000thingsofthepnw.com

Hi everyone! Due to the Coronavirus and social distancing, we are again doing a virtual meeting!

This meetup will be held as a Zoom meeting. For security reasons, the meeting ID is only available to people who RSVP here, receive the Scarabogram in the mail, or contact the host directly. If you have any trouble or need the meeting ID outside of meetup, please feel free to email me at [masked]. For those who attended any of the last few meetings the zoom number and instructions should be exactly the same. See you Monday!

Native Solitary Bee Foraging Behavior in Western Washington — by Lila Westreich

Bees are a vital part of the ecosystem, providing pollination services to plants and contributing to biodiversity. Nearly 900 native bee species, mostly solitary, are known from the Northwest! Spring-emerging solitary native bees face a unique and sometimes inhospitable landscape, and must forage amongst the early spring blooms to accumulate the resources they need for growth and development. Lila will give background on local native solitary bee species, discuss types of flowering plants bees prefer in the urban Seattle area, talk about pollen nutrient quality and how it can affect solitary bee health, and the relationships between bacteria, fungi, and foraging bees based on her doctoral research projects.

Lila is a UW Ph.D. candidate in the Tobin lab, studying pollinator ecology. Native bees search among angiosperms to find the most nutritionally sufficient food sources for their offspring, and the patterns of foraging behavior and their impact on development are not well understood. Along with pollen, bees collect microorganisms such as bacteria on the surface of flowers, which are transported back to the nest and are thought to play a role in the development of offspring. Lila is working to identify pollen and microorganisms collected from native mason bees using Next-Generation Sequencing, a technology new to the study of native bees. Prior to coming to the UW, Lila earned a B.S. in plant breeding and genetics from the University of Minnesota.

Hi everyone! Due to the Coronavirus and social distancing, we are again doing a virtual meeting!

This meetup will be held as a Zoom meeting. For security reasons, the meeting ID is only available to people who RSVP here, receive the Scarabogram in the mail, or contact the host directly. If you have any trouble or need the meeting ID outside of meetup, please feel free to email me at [masked]. For those who attended any of the last few meetings the zoom number and instructions should be exactly the same. See you Monday!

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