What we're about

“Caring for myself is not self-indulgence, it is self-preservation, and that is an act of political warfare.” – Audre Lorde

WHAT IS MEDITATION?

MEDITATION IS A PERIOD OF TIME SET ASIDE EVERY DAY TO PRACTICE QUIETING THE MIND

Meditation helps you become calm and balanced. It is a way for you to cultivate a connection to the eternal side of being. In the beginning of meditation practice, we work on slowing down our thoughts. After some practice, we learn to stop thoughts completely. When you become adept in meditation, you learn to enter the pinnacle state of meditation called Samadhi. In Samadhi the mind is perfectly merged with Nirvana, the essence of life.

TIME TO RECHARGE

MEDITATION RECHARGES YOU AND BRINGS YOU INTO BRIGHT STATES OF CONSCIOUSNESS

Meditation brings clarity of mind and awakens your intuition. It makes you happy and bright. It also empowers you to accomplish things in the daily world by connecting you to the power of the universe. Eventually, dedicated meditation practice leads to Enlightenment. Each meditation session, including your first meditation, brings you into a greater condition of light. Each meditation session brings you closer to Enlightenment.

ENHANCE FOCUS, CLARITY & POWER

WHEN THOUGHTS STOP, CONNECTION TO WORLDS OF LIGHT AND POWER BEGIN.

Meditation generally involves focusing on energy centers in the body, concentrating on a picture or image, chanting, or breathing exercises. Regardless of the style, they all share a common goal: stopping thought. When our thoughts stop, we can connect to worlds of light, power, wisdom, and pure consciousness. You will find that each meditation session brings a little more clarity and power into your life. The most important things are perseverance in your practice and the ability to never judge your meditation. Meditation takes practice, so don't expect too much too soon. If you find your mind wandering away from your meditation, do not get frustrated. Simply bring your mind gently back to the technique.

Upcoming events (5+)

Sister Satsang

San Francisco State University

~ This class focuses on a meditation practice for Black Women/Female Bodied Folx. If you plan to attend & this is not how you identify, please be comfortable in this space. :) ~ Today we will discuss Personal History. We will start on a three class segment involving mindfulness and acquiring an awareness of our personal history that will involve a written assignment. **What is Personal History?** Society tells us stories. Society's stories tell us who we are and what will make us happy. Society's stories are often more compelling than scientific and religious stories because, while narrower in scope, they have a lot more to do with our day-to-day lives. Society has a compelling plan for us based on general parameters such as our gender, our income bracket, and the color of our skin. With these criteria society dictates to us an authoritative story that tells us who we are. The societal self-definition has tremendous weight because it is reflected back to us and reinforced every time we shop, dine out, watch TV, read magazines, work, or go to school. The problem is that this definition of self is greatly limited. Society lumps each of us into a demographic with at least a million other people and holds us to the perception of that group's most common societal attributes. Society’s definition of self robs us of our individuality, uniqueness, and spiritual independence. Society also tells us a powerful story of what is “good,” what is “bad,” and what will make us “happy.” Society tells us that success and beauty are good. Society informs us that success comes from having a high paying job and an accumulation of fine objects. Society describes beauty as being tall, thin, and fair-skinned. Society cautions us that being different is bad. Society conditions us to fit into the mold of a proper “lady” or “gentleman.” Society warns us not to speak, dress, or act differently from societal norms. Finally, society teaches us that happiness comes from having a relationship with a proper lady or gentleman who is successful and beautiful. In the United States our societal story of happiness is called the American Dream. The American Dream tells us that happiness is having a house with a white picket fence, a successful and beautiful spouse, 2.3 children, and a Ford parked in the driveway. We, modern day Westerners with more civil rights and choices than ever, have heard many stories of faith and fact that describe life. We have had so many stories marketed to us that we don’t really know which ones to buy into. The contradictions amongst the stories only serve to confuse us further. We are more open-minded than ever, but also more apathetic. It’s hard to swallow religious stories on faith when they don’t match our reality. The things we learn in church often have little to do with our experiences in school and the working world. At the same time, it’s hard to believe that the American Dream is enough. The stories society and the media tell us are often more meaningful to our experience than those of the church, but they offer no lasting satisfaction. The Black Radical Tradition and Feminism offer us awarenesses of service to others and to our community. In order to engage with it authentically we need to have a deeper awareness of who we are and the stories that we hold.

Sister Satsang

San Francisco State University

~ This class focuses on a meditation practice for Black Women/Female Bodied Folx. If you plan to attend & this is not how you identify, please be comfortable in this space. :) ~ Today we will discuss Personal History. We will start on a three class segment involving mindfulness and acquiring an awareness of our personal history that will involve a written assignment. **What is Personal History?** Society tells us stories. Society's stories tell us who we are and what will make us happy. Society's stories are often more compelling than scientific and religious stories because, while narrower in scope, they have a lot more to do with our day-to-day lives. Society has a compelling plan for us based on general parameters such as our gender, our income bracket, and the color of our skin. With these criteria society dictates to us an authoritative story that tells us who we are. The societal self-definition has tremendous weight because it is reflected back to us and reinforced every time we shop, dine out, watch TV, read magazines, work, or go to school. The problem is that this definition of self is greatly limited. Society lumps each of us into a demographic with at least a million other people and holds us to the perception of that group's most common societal attributes. Society’s definition of self robs us of our individuality, uniqueness, and spiritual independence. Society also tells us a powerful story of what is “good,” what is “bad,” and what will make us “happy.” Society tells us that success and beauty are good. Society informs us that success comes from having a high paying job and an accumulation of fine objects. Society describes beauty as being tall, thin, and fair-skinned. Society cautions us that being different is bad. Society conditions us to fit into the mold of a proper “lady” or “gentleman.” Society warns us not to speak, dress, or act differently from societal norms. Finally, society teaches us that happiness comes from having a relationship with a proper lady or gentleman who is successful and beautiful. In the United States our societal story of happiness is called the American Dream. The American Dream tells us that happiness is having a house with a white picket fence, a successful and beautiful spouse, 2.3 children, and a Ford parked in the driveway. We, modern day Westerners with more civil rights and choices than ever, have heard many stories of faith and fact that describe life. We have had so many stories marketed to us that we don’t really know which ones to buy into. The contradictions amongst the stories only serve to confuse us further. We are more open-minded than ever, but also more apathetic. It’s hard to swallow religious stories on faith when they don’t match our reality. The things we learn in church often have little to do with our experiences in school and the working world. At the same time, it’s hard to believe that the American Dream is enough. The stories society and the media tell us are often more meaningful to our experience than those of the church, but they offer no lasting satisfaction. The Black Radical Tradition and Feminism offer us awarenesses of service to others and to our community. In order to engage with it authentically we need to have a deeper awareness of who we are and the stories that we hold.

Sister Satsang

San Francisco State University

~ This class focuses on a meditation practice for Black Women/Female Bodied Folx. If you plan to attend & this is not how you identify, please be comfortable in this space. :) ~ Today we will discuss Personal History. We will start on a three class segment involving mindfulness and acquiring an awareness of our personal history that will involve a written assignment. **What is Personal History?** Society tells us stories. Society's stories tell us who we are and what will make us happy. Society's stories are often more compelling than scientific and religious stories because, while narrower in scope, they have a lot more to do with our day-to-day lives. Society has a compelling plan for us based on general parameters such as our gender, our income bracket, and the color of our skin. With these criteria society dictates to us an authoritative story that tells us who we are. The societal self-definition has tremendous weight because it is reflected back to us and reinforced every time we shop, dine out, watch TV, read magazines, work, or go to school. The problem is that this definition of self is greatly limited. Society lumps each of us into a demographic with at least a million other people and holds us to the perception of that group's most common societal attributes. Society’s definition of self robs us of our individuality, uniqueness, and spiritual independence. Society also tells us a powerful story of what is “good,” what is “bad,” and what will make us “happy.” Society tells us that success and beauty are good. Society informs us that success comes from having a high paying job and an accumulation of fine objects. Society describes beauty as being tall, thin, and fair-skinned. Society cautions us that being different is bad. Society conditions us to fit into the mold of a proper “lady” or “gentleman.” Society warns us not to speak, dress, or act differently from societal norms. Finally, society teaches us that happiness comes from having a relationship with a proper lady or gentleman who is successful and beautiful. In the United States our societal story of happiness is called the American Dream. The American Dream tells us that happiness is having a house with a white picket fence, a successful and beautiful spouse, 2.3 children, and a Ford parked in the driveway. We, modern day Westerners with more civil rights and choices than ever, have heard many stories of faith and fact that describe life. We have had so many stories marketed to us that we don’t really know which ones to buy into. The contradictions amongst the stories only serve to confuse us further. We are more open-minded than ever, but also more apathetic. It’s hard to swallow religious stories on faith when they don’t match our reality. The things we learn in church often have little to do with our experiences in school and the working world. At the same time, it’s hard to believe that the American Dream is enough. The stories society and the media tell us are often more meaningful to our experience than those of the church, but they offer no lasting satisfaction. The Black Radical Tradition and Feminism offer us awarenesses of service to others and to our community. In order to engage with it authentically we need to have a deeper awareness of who we are and the stories that we hold.

Sister Satsang

San Francisco State University

~ This class focuses on a meditation practice for Black Women/Female Bodied Folx. If you plan to attend & this is not how you identify, please be comfortable in this space. :) ~ Today we will discuss Personal History. We will start on a three class segment involving mindfulness and acquiring an awareness of our personal history that will involve a written assignment. **What is Personal History?** Society tells us stories. Society's stories tell us who we are and what will make us happy. Society's stories are often more compelling than scientific and religious stories because, while narrower in scope, they have a lot more to do with our day-to-day lives. Society has a compelling plan for us based on general parameters such as our gender, our income bracket, and the color of our skin. With these criteria society dictates to us an authoritative story that tells us who we are. The societal self-definition has tremendous weight because it is reflected back to us and reinforced every time we shop, dine out, watch TV, read magazines, work, or go to school. The problem is that this definition of self is greatly limited. Society lumps each of us into a demographic with at least a million other people and holds us to the perception of that group's most common societal attributes. Society’s definition of self robs us of our individuality, uniqueness, and spiritual independence. Society also tells us a powerful story of what is “good,” what is “bad,” and what will make us “happy.” Society tells us that success and beauty are good. Society informs us that success comes from having a high paying job and an accumulation of fine objects. Society describes beauty as being tall, thin, and fair-skinned. Society cautions us that being different is bad. Society conditions us to fit into the mold of a proper “lady” or “gentleman.” Society warns us not to speak, dress, or act differently from societal norms. Finally, society teaches us that happiness comes from having a relationship with a proper lady or gentleman who is successful and beautiful. In the United States our societal story of happiness is called the American Dream. The American Dream tells us that happiness is having a house with a white picket fence, a successful and beautiful spouse, 2.3 children, and a Ford parked in the driveway. We, modern day Westerners with more civil rights and choices than ever, have heard many stories of faith and fact that describe life. We have had so many stories marketed to us that we don’t really know which ones to buy into. The contradictions amongst the stories only serve to confuse us further. We are more open-minded than ever, but also more apathetic. It’s hard to swallow religious stories on faith when they don’t match our reality. The things we learn in church often have little to do with our experiences in school and the working world. At the same time, it’s hard to believe that the American Dream is enough. The stories society and the media tell us are often more meaningful to our experience than those of the church, but they offer no lasting satisfaction. The Black Radical Tradition and Feminism offer us awarenesses of service to others and to our community. In order to engage with it authentically we need to have a deeper awareness of who we are and the stories that we hold.

Past events (6)

Sister Satsang

San Francisco State University

Photos (2)