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Trinity Long Room Hub Arts and Humanities Research Institute hosts over 300 free public events for audience interested in a wide ranges of disciplines, including History, film, art, law and languages.

Upcoming events (4)

Behind the Headlines | The Future of Ireland and its Borders

Neill Lecture Theatre in the Trinity Long Room Hub: Arts and Humanities Research Institute Trinity College Dublin

The Irish border has been subject to intense speculation following the 2016 Brexit referendum, when the people of the UK voted to leave the European Union. Public discourse has followed the fluctuating positions on whether there will be a hard or soft Brexit, deal or no deal, and border or no border. The increasing plausibility of a no-deal Brexit has left ongoing uncertainty as to the economic and political implications. In Ireland, emerging conversations around what happens after Brexit have led many to cautiously consider the prospect of a united Ireland. Please note: We hold a limited amount of allocated spaces for members from the Meetup community. If all space here are filled you can also register through Eventbrite found through our Facebook page and also through our website www.tcd.ie/trinitylongroomhub.ie In our first Behind the Headlines of the new academic year, we will bring together a panel of diverse voices to discuss what we can hope for the future of the island of Ireland, Ireland’s relationship with Northern Ireland and any potential changes that would impact its law, culture, identity, politics, and government. Speakers Dr Etain Tannam, Associate Professor, International Peace Studies, School of Religion, TCD Dr David Kenny, Assistant Professor, Constitutional Law, School of Law, TCD Jan Carson, Belfast-based writer and author of The Firestarters; Winner of the EU Prize for Literature 2019 Rory Montgomery, former Second Secretary General, Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade The Trinity Long Room Hub Behind the Headlines series is supported by the John Pollard Foundation.

CANCELLED : Out of the Ashes - Lessons Learnt from a Painful Past

Neill Lecture Theatre in the Trinity Long Room Hub: Arts and Humanities Research Institute Trinity College Dublin

Due to unforeseen circumstances the Trinity Long Room Hub has had to cancel this lecture. Apologies for any inconvenience caused. This public lecture by Dr Saad Eskander (former National Librarian of Iraq) is organised by Trinity Long Room Hub as part of the Out of the Ashes Lecture Series. The Out of the Ashes lecture series is generously supported by Sean and Sarah Reynolds.

A Love Letter to Realism in a Time of Grief - What Does it Mean to Be Human?

Edmund Burke Theatre - Arts Building,

“Spinal Injury strikes at the very heart of what it means to be human” – Mark Pollock A lecture by explorer Mark Pollock and human rights lawyer Simone George as part of the Trinity Long Room Hub 'What does it Mean to be Human in the 21st Century?' lecture series. Please Note : This event is ticketed, you can buy tickets through the www.tcd.ie/trinitylongroomhub website and through www.eventbrite.ie general tickets are 10Euro /Students 5Euro (Students must have valid student card with them at the event) When faced with life's toughest circumstances, how should we respond: as an optimist, a realist or something else? In an unforgettable talk, explorer Mark Pollock and human rights lawyer Simone George explore the tension between acceptance and hope in times of grief -- and share the ground-breaking work they're undertaking to cure paralysis. Simone George and Mark Pollock delivered a joint TED talk in 2018 which was recorded at the TED Conference in Vancouver and received over 1.5 million views in its first 6 months online. For the finale of the What it Means to Be Human in the 21st Century, they will join us in Trinity College Dublin to speak about on the journey from injury to inspiration in an exploration of human endeavour. Simone and Mark’s talk will be followed by a short interview hosted by Ian Robertson, neuroscientist and clinical psychologist, and questions from the audience. About the speakers: Simone George Simone George is a human rights lawyer and activist, a consultant commercial litigator and a TED2018 Speaker. As a human rights lawyer, she represents women who are experiencing abuse and is presently researching why those in our systems don’t adequately serve justice. She is a director on the board of the Christopher and Dana Reeve Foundation; a masters graduate from The College of Europe, Bruges, she holds a diploma from Harvard and is a double-graduate of NUI Galway. Mark Pollock Mark Pollock is an Explorer, Innovator & Collaboration Catalyst. After becoming blind in 1998, Mark became an adventure athlete competing in ultra-endurance races across deserts, mountains, and the polar ice caps including being the first blind person to race to the South Pole. In 2010 a fall from a second story window left him paralysed. Now he is on a new expedition, this time exploring the intersection where humans and technology collide on his personal mission to cure paralysis in our lifetime. Mark is the subject of the acclaimed documentaries ‘Blind Man Walking’ and ‘Unbreakable – The Mark Pollock Story’, and is co-Founder of the global running series called Run in the Dark (www.runinthedark.org). About the series: 'What does it Mean to be Human in the 21st Century?' is a new cross-disciplinary lecture series which will reflect on how we understand ourselves, the world, and our place within it. The lecture series is organised by the Trinity Long Room Hub Arts and Humanities Research Institute in partnership with The Dock, Accenture’s global research & incubation hub in Dublin. This new series will bring some prominent international academic and industry voices to Trinity to discuss the human experience of today and its future in the face of accelerated change brought about by artificial intelligence and technology. A broad ranging series of talks traversing the humanities, sciences, arts and social sciences, join us in 2019 for an unmissable snapshot of human progress; who we are, where we are, and where we’re going.

2019 Humanities Horizons : Irish Slaves in America

Edmund Burke Theatre - Arts Building,

Annual Humanities Horizons Lecture 2019 will be delivered by Anthea Butler, Associate Professor of Religious Studies and Africana Studies. Irish Slaves in America: Myths, History, and the problems of Social Media Stories of Irish slavery on Facebook, Twitter and other platforms abound as both history and conspiracy theories that obscure the actual history of Irish indentured servitude and Black chattel slavery in America. These readings of history promoted by conspiracy theorists on social media platforms serve another purpose: to support white nationalist beliefs, oppose immigration, and even to denigrate religious traditions. For scholars not attuned to these conspiracy theories, these are trying times that put the teaching of history in tension with students, colleagues, religious institutions, and the state. Professor Butler's lecture will engage these urgent issues, paying special attention to the relationship between Ireland and America on race, immigration, and religion, both past and present. Please note: We hold a limited amount of allocated spaces for members from the Meetup community. If all space here are filled you can also register through Eventbrite found through our Facebook page and also through our website www.tcd.ie/trinitylongroomhub.ie About Anthea Butler Anthea Butler is Associate Professor of Religious Studies and Africana Studies at the University of Pennsylvania, and Graduate chair of Religious Studies. A historian of African American and American religion, Professor Butler’s research and writing African American religion and history, politics, religion and gender, sexuality, media, and popular culture. She is the author of and Women in the Church of God in Christ: Making A Sanctified World published by The University of North Carolina Press. Her current projects include a book on race, politics, and evangelicals in the late 20th century, and a book on reading, material religion and race in the early 20th century for UNC Press. Professor Butler was awarded a Luce/ACLS Fellowship for the Religion, Journalism and International Affairs grant for[masked] academic year to investigate Prosperity gospel and politics in the American and Nigerian context. She has also been appointed as a Presidential fellow at Yale Divinity School for the[masked] academic year. A sought-after commentator on the BBC, MSNBC, CNN, The History Channel and PBS, Professor Butler regularly writes opinion pieces covering religion, race, politics and popular culture for The New York Times, The Washington Post, Huff Po, NBC, and The Guardian. She has also served as a consultant to the PBS series God in America and the American Experience on Aimee Semple McPherson and is currently serving as a consultant for forthcoming series on Evangelicalism and the Black Church for PBS.

Past events (25)

Ecologies of Cultural Production

Neill Lecture Theatre in the Trinity Long Room Hub: Arts and Humanities Research Institute Trinity College Dublin

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