What we're about

A contemporary fiction book club in Austin that will focus on current and recent authors such as:

Haruki Murakami Martin Amis Dave Eggers

Ian McEwan Cormac McCarthy Don DeLillo

Julian Barnes Jhumpa Lahiri Saul Bellow

Khaled Hosseini Donna Tartt Rohinton Mistry

J M Coetzee Gary Shteyngart Toni Morrison

Michael Ondaatje Jennifer Egan Margaret Atwood

Michael Chabon Junot Diaz Daniel Sada

Orhan Pamuk Juan Gabriel Vasquez

John Williams James Salter Mark Zusak

and many, many more.

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Two meetings a month, one in north Austin the other south, with a lively book discussion and socializing with food and drink.

Our hopeful aim is to have everyone participate in our discussions and to come away having a greater appreciation and understanding of the book we have read.

Upcoming events (5+)

Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens, 379 p

Black Walnut

For years, rumors of the "Marsh Girl" have haunted Barkley Cove, a quiet town on the North Carolina coast. So in late 1969, when handsome Chase Andrews is found dead, the locals immediately suspect Kya Clark, the so-called Marsh Girl. But Kya is not what they say. Sensitive and intelligent, she has survived for years alone in the marsh that she calls home, finding friends in the gulls and lessons in the sand. Then the time comes when she yearns to be touched and loved. When two young men from town become intrigued by her wild beauty, Kya opens herself to a new life - until the unthinkable happens.

THE MILKMAN by Anna Burns, 369 pp.

Lynda's Office

In an unnamed city, middle sister stands out for the wrong reasons. She reads while walking, for one. And she has been taking French night classes downtown. So when a local paramilitary known as the milkman begins pursuing her, she suddenly becomes “interesting,” the last thing she ever wanted to be. Despite middle sister’s attempts to avoid him―and to keep her mother from finding out about her maybe-boyfriend―rumors spread and the threat of violence lingers. *Milkman* is a story of the way inaction can have enormous repercussions, in a time when the wrong flag, wrong religion, or even a sunset can be subversive. Told with ferocious energy and sly, wicked humor, *Milkman* establishes Anna Burns as one of the most consequential voices of our day. Winner of the Man Booker Prize “Everything about this novel rings true. . . . Original, funny, disarmingly oblique and unique.”―The Guardian

Killers of the Flower Moon (347 pages) by David Grann

This is non-fiction but an outstanding book In 1920s Oklahoma, many members of the oil-wealthy Osage Nation were dying untimely and suspicious deaths. The widespread crimes against the Osage and the inability to identify those responsible led to the establishment of what is now known as the FBI. Grann, author of the best-selling The Lost City of Z, makes a complex web of violence and deception easy to follow by keeping the focus on one Osage woman, Mollie Burkhart, whose family members were murdered one by one. This gripping title uncovers a baffling level of corruption. The author points his investigative lens at the perpetrators of the murders, reveals cover-ups by authorities all the way up to the national level, and illustrates that the deception continued almost a century later. There are plenty of curriculum connections: Native American and Osage tribal history, economics, law enforcement, and journalism. A varied selection of photographs help to set the scene for readers. End pages include comprehensive source notes, citations, and a bibliography. VERDICT This thoroughly researched, suspenseful exposé will appeal to followers of true crime programs such as the podcast Serial and the Netflix documentary series Making a Murderer, as well as to fans of Louise Erdrich's The Round House.

10:04 by Ben Lerner, 256 pp.

Lynda's Office

In the last year, the narrator of *10:04* has enjoyed unlikely literary success, has been diagnosed with a potentially fatal medical condition, and has been asked by his best friend to help her conceive a child. In a New York of increasingly frequent superstorms and social unrest, he must reckon with his own mortality and the prospect of fatherhood in a city that might soon be underwater. In prose that Jonathan Franzen has called "hilarious ... cracklingly intelligent ... and original in every sentence," Lerner captures what it's like to be alive now, during the twilight of an empire, when the difficulty of imagining a future is changing our relationship to both the present and the past.

Past events (199)

THERE, THERE by Tommy Orange, 304 pp.

Lynda's Office

Photos (177)