• MakerLisp Machine: an eZ80 CPU card running bare-metal Lisp

    Hello, Hacker Ladies & Gentlemen! Please join us for another round of talks on Lisp and Scheme topics. We'll be at Hacker Dojo in Santa Clara. We'll start with a long-form talk by Luther Johnson on his work on MakerLisp and the MakerLisp Lisp Machine. Here's the abstract: -- The MakerLisp Machine is a portable, modular, computer system, designed to recapture the feel of classic computing, with modern hardware. The machine centers on a 2” x 3.5” CPU "business card", based on a 50 MHz Zilog eZ80, which can be used stand-alone, or plugged in to a 2” x 8” main board, for expansion to a full computer system. A laser-cut wood enclosure holds a small keyboard, an LCD monitor, the circuit boards, and a prototyping area with a breadboard for electronics experimentation and development. The system software is 'MakerLisp', an open source implementation of a 'bare metal' Lisp, for Maker/DIY projects. MakerLisp has the Scheme evaluation model, Common Lisp-style low-level macros and primitive functions, and C language arithmetic and standard library functions. The system is written in portable C, and just-in-time compiles a tiny core Lisp language to SECD VM instructions. All higher-level forms are provided via Lisp functions and macros. In this talk, we'll discuss and demonstrate MakerLisp on the machine, reviewing the language feature and implementation choices that were made in order to support an expressive and extensible dialect of Lisp, with good performance, in a small system. -- You're welcome to speak, too, if you'd like. The rest of the talks will be five-minute "lightning" talks, with five minutes of Q&A after each. The group is a friendly audience, and we'd love to hear about your work or hobby project, so please give a talk. The more, the merrier! If you'd like to give a talk, either let us know in advance through Meetup.com, or just tell me when you arrive. After the talks, we'll mingle and have snacks.

    7
  • Lisping on Millions of Devices: Mobile Code at Scale

    Room 115 at Stanford Science Teaching Learning Center

    Hello, Hacker Ladies & Gentlemen! Please join us for a talk by Wes Henderson, creator of mocl, a Lisp implementation for iOS and Android. Abstract: It's hard enough to create proof-of-concept mobile applications, let alone ones that scale to the masses. We discuss some of the practical challenges of developing mobile code that must run across millions of heterogeneous devices. Bio: Wes Henderson is a Lead Software Engineer at Factual. Prior to joining Factual, Wes created mocl, a Lisp implementation for iOS and Android, as well as LambdaLite, a functional, relational database. Wes has been a founder at two technology startups and holds a B.S. in Computer Science from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. We won't have time for lightning talks this time because we don't have the room for long enough. Please note that this talk will not be recorded. This meeting is being held jointly with Biolisp. Thanks very much to Bohdan Khomtchouk, organizer of Biolisp, for organizing the meeting and securing the meeting space at Stanford.

    5
  • Lisp at the Frontier of Computation

    Rigetti Computing

    NDA: Because this is hosted at Rigetti Computing’s labs, an NDA will need to be signed at reception. See below for details. ABSTRACT: Since the 50s, Lisp has been used to describe and calculate in cutting-edge fields like artificial intelligence, robotics, symbolic mathematics, and advanced optimizing compilers. It is no surprise that Lisp has also found relevance in quantum computation, both in academia and industry. Hosted at Rigetti Computing, a quantum computing startup in Berkeley, Robert Smith will provide a pragmatic view of the technical, sociological, and psychological aspects of working with an interdisciplinary team, writing Lisp, to build the next generation of technology resource: the quantum computer. ABOUT THE SPEAKER: Robert has been using Lisp for over decade, and has been fortunate to work with and manage expert teams of Lisp programmers to build embedded fingerprint analysis systems, machine learning-based product recommendation software, metamaterial phased-array antennas, discrete differential geometric computer graphics software, and now quantum computers. As Director of Software Engineering, Robert is responsible for building the publicly available Rigetti Forest platform, powered by both a real quantum computer and one of the fastest single-node quantum computer simulators in the world. TENTATIVE SCHEDULE: 6:00 - 6:15: Welcome and sign-in. 6:15 - 6:30: Quantum computer lab tour. See what a real quantum computer looks like. 6:30 - 6:45: Grab food. Pizza and beverages provided. 6:45: No one will be admitted after this point. (There will be no receptionist.) 6:45 - 7:45: Talk. 7:45 - 8:30: Chat and mingle. 8:30: Hard stop. LOCATION & PARKING: 775 Heinz Ave., Berkeley, CA 94710 (https://maps.google.com/?q=775+Heinz+Ave.,+Berkeley,+CA+94710&entry=gmail&source=g) If you plan to travel by car, be aware that some parking lots are private and prohibited. Allowed zones include street parking on Heinz Ave., and there is plentiful parking in the lot near the office on the west side Seventh St. See the map above (next to the Rigetti logo) for these allowed zones. NON-DISCLOSURE AGREEMENT Note that our hosts, Rigetti Computing, require everyone to sign an NDA before attending. If you would like to review a copy of the NDA in advance, please send a note to the BALisp organizers at balisp at googlegroups dot com.

    17
  • Biochat: organizing the world's biological information through AI

    Hello, Hacker Ladies & Gentlemen! Please join us for a talk on bioinformatics in Lisp by Bohdan Khomtchouk (http://bohdankhomtchouk.com/), Postdoctoral Research Scholar at Stanford University. He will be talking about Biochat ( https://github.com/Bohdan-Khomtchouk/Biochat ), whose aim is to provide an interactive workbench through which biological databases (e.g., Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/), miRBase (http://www.mirbase.org/), TCGA (https://cancergenome.nih.gov/), Human Epigenome Atlas (https://www.genboree.org/epigenomeatlas/index.rhtml), etc.) can learn to communicate with each other by matching and pairing similar data records across the biological data-verse. Biochat is written in Common Lisp. Bohdan is a founder and organizer of the Biolisp organization ( http://biolisp.org ), and has taken over the reigns in leadership from Jeff Shrager (at Stanford) and Peter Karp (at SRI). He is working on building a community in the Bay Area & San Francisco. He wanted me to make sure to say that Biolisp welcomes anyone interested in Lisp (any dialect), in data science, or in biology. Bohdan was a keynote speaker (http://med.miami.edu/news/miller-school-researchers-help-push-the-limits-of-programming-languages-in-) at the 2017 European Lisp Symposium . He was first author of: https://academic.oup.com/bib/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/bib/bbw130 . After Bohdan's talk, you're welcome to speak, too. The rest of the talks will be five-minute "lightning" talks, with five-minute Q&A after each. BALisp is a friendly audience. We'd love to hear about your work or hobby project, so please give a talk. The more, the merrier! If you'd like to give a talk, either let me know in advance through Meetup.com, or just tell me when you arrive. After the talks, we'll mingle and have snacks. We're looking forward to seeing you there! P.S.: During the meeting, the HD-Events wifi network will be available with this password: e7eyqd.

    2
  • Roger Corman, author of Corman Common Lisp

    Factual SF

    Hello, Hacker Ladies & Gentlemen! Please join us for a talk by Roger Corman (https://www.linkedin.com/in/rgcorman), CTO of DealSignal. In his distinguished career, he has created Corman Common Lisp ("Common Lisp supercharged for Windows platforms"), developed industry-leading clinical systems that encode medical logic in the Arden language, developed an intelligent biology platform at the SRI AI Center, and more. This is part of the Factual Tech Talks series. Factual will be hosting us at their offices in San Francisco. Many thanks to Factual and to Wes Henderson for being our hosts, and to Roger for agreeing to give the talk. Since we're starting in the evening, we won't do lightning talks this time. That gives everyone more time to get their talks ready for next time! After Roger's talk, we'll mingle and have snacks. We're looking forward to seeing you there!

    1
  • Tricks of an Efficient Embedded Lisp Interpreter, then lightning talks

    Hello, Hacker Ladies & Gentlemen! Please join us for another round of talks on Lisp and Scheme topics. We'll be at the new Hacker Dojo location in Santa Clara. We'll start with a long-form talk by Jonas Karlsson on his work on Lisp on embedded devices. Jonas gave a fascinating lightning talk last time. This time, we'll have a chance to hear a more in-depth talk about his work. Here's his abstract: Esp-lisp is an efficient interpreted lisp written for ESP-8266 (or linux) embedded microcontroller, with built-in WIFI, 4M flash, 100KB usb programmable for ~3USD. You can connect through the usb as terminal and interact. We'll discuss some of challenges of implementation: closures, tail-call-optimizations, event-tasker, GC, storage optimizations, error handling, debugger, nodejs style web-callbacks, pretty-printer, nlambda, full-screen emacs style editor. You're welcome to speak, too, if you'd like. The rest of the talks will be five-minute "lightning" talks, with five-minute Q&A after each. The group is a friendly audience, and we'd love to hear about your work or hobby project, so please give a talk. The more, the merrier! If you'd like to give a talk, either let me us in advance through Meetup.com, or just tell me when you arrive. After the talks, we'll mingle and have snacks. Hacker Dojo event

    8
  • 3L: an Operating System in Scheme, then lightning talks

    Hello, Hacker Ladies & Gentlemen! Please join us for another round of talks on Lisp and Scheme topics. We'll be at the new Hacker Dojo location in Santa Clara. We'll start with a long-form talk by Thomas Hintz on his 3L, a project to build a secure operating system in Scheme. You're welcome to speak, too, if you'd like. The rest of the talks will be five-minute "lightning" talks, with five-minute Q&A after each. The group is a friendly audience, and we'd love to hear about your work or hobby project, so please give a talk. The more, the merrier! If you'd like to give a talk, either let me know in advance through Meetup.com, or just tell me when you arrive. After the talks, we'll mingle and have snacks. http://events.hackerdojo.com/event/5785884477620224-bay-area-lisp-and-scheme-users-group

    10
  • Elements of Style Meets Functional Programming, then lightning talks

    Fitbit API lead Zach Tellman gives a sneak peek of his upcoming book, Elements of Clojure (http://elementsofclojure.com/), addressing topics such as idioms, indirection, and large-scale software design. After Zach's talk, the floor opens to five-minute "lightning" talks, with five-minute Q&A after each. If you wish to give a lightning talk you can reach out ahead of time or let us know upon arrival. Part of the Factual Tech Talks series.

    2
  • Elliptic curve cryptography in Lisp, then lightning talks, at Hacker Do

    Hacker Dojo Large Event Room

    Hello, Hacker Ladies & Gentlemen! Please join us for another round of talks on Lisp and Scheme topics. We'll start with a long-form talk by Ron Garret about elliptic curve cryptography and Lisp. (Ron gave the well-received talk on lambda calculus (YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8qC1iZN5ozw)) at our meeting in October. More details on this talk will follow.) You're welcome to speak, too, if you'd like. The rest of the talks will be five-minute "lightning" talks, with five-minute Q&A after each. The group is a friendly audience, and we'd love to hear about your work or hobby project, so please give a talk. The more, the merrier! If you'd like to give a talk, either let me know in advance through Meetup.com, or just tell me when you arrive. After the talks, we'll mingle and have snacks. Please park in one of the parking lots on either side of the Hacker Dojo building. (The lots are open to guests on weekends.) Hacker Dojo event link (http://events.hackerdojo.com/event/5882284095832064-bay-area-lisp-and-scheme-meetup)

    7