• Boston Python October Project Night
    Hosting and pizza provided by DataDog (https://www.datadoghq.com/). Bring a laptop. Bring ideas. Bring questions. Bring enthusiasm. Bring friends. The Boston Python Project Night is a time to find others with compatible interests, and work away. Code, hack, teach, learn, meet, laugh, talk: anything goes at Project Night. You don't need to have a project, and you don't have to show anything to anyone! This is an opportunity to work together with like-minded people. That's it! All skill levels are welcome. There will be at least two tables of beginning learners, and helpers for them. Other table-topics in the past have been Django, Data, Web Scraping, Hardware, Puzzle, Science, Art. Maybe you have another idea? Bring it!

    Data Dog Boston

    225 Franklin Street 24th Floor. · Boston, ma

    5 comments
  • CFFI and Neural Networks
    Pizza sponsored by Quantopian (https://www.quantopian.com), drinks after sponsored by Luminoso (https://luminoso.com). Two talks tonight: Kostya Nazarenko, The magic of CFFI A gentle applied introduction to the latest, and some would argue hottest, addition to the family of foreign function invocation libraries. If you need to call an existing C library from your Python application and not sure where to start - this talk might help you to make a decision! Jared Stufft: Intro to Neural Networks with Keras In this talk we'll introduce the idea of the Neural Network: what they are, why they're used, and how they work. We'll wrap up with a demonstration and code example using Keras, a neural network API designed for humans. We'll head to Meadhall afterwards for drinks!

    Microsoft New England Research & Development Center (NERD)

    One Memorial Drive Suite 100 · Cambridge, MA

    22 comments
  • September Project Night
    Pizza sponsored by Twilio (https://www.twilio.com). Bring a laptop. Bring ideas. Bring questions. Bring enthusiasm. Bring friends. The Boston Python Project Night is a time to find others with compatible interests, and work away. Code, hack, teach, learn, meet, laugh, talk: anything goes at Project Night. You don't need to have a project, and you don't have to show anything to anyone! This is an opportunity to work together with like-minded people. That's it! All skill levels are welcome. There will be at least two tables of beginning learners, and helpers for them. Other table-topics in the past have been Django, Data, Web Scraping, Hardware, Puzzle, Science, Art. Maybe you have another idea? Bring it!

    Microsoft New England Research & Development Center (NERD)

    One Memorial Drive Suite 100 · Cambridge, MA

    6 comments
  • Lightning Talks!
    Pizza sponsored by PathAI (https://www.pathai.com). Tonight, a buffet of all Lightning Talks! 5-10 minutes each, on a mixture of topics: Sean Harrington: Getting into a Pickle with Multiprocessing Itamar Turner-Trauring: Eliot, the causal logging library Eric A Moore: A quick look at a pandas DataFrame Ethan Strominger: Refactoring and Static Code Analysis with PyCharm Andromeda Yelton: What if you did very bad things with integers? Patrick Crouse: Estimating Pi (plus maybe one or two more...)

    Microsoft New England Research & Development Center (NERD)

    One Memorial Drive Suite 100 · Cambridge, MA

    9 comments
  • August Project Night
    Pizza sponsored by Pluralsight (https://www.pluralsight.com). Bring a laptop. Bring ideas. Bring questions. Bring enthusiasm. Bring friends. The Boston Python Project Night is a time to find others with compatible interests, and work away. Code, hack, teach, learn, meet, laugh, talk: anything goes at Project Night. You don't need to have a project, and you don't have to show anything to anyone! This is an opportunity to work together with like-minded people. That's it! All skill levels are welcome. There will be at least two tables of beginning learners, and helpers for them. Other table-topics in the past have been Django, Data, Web Scraping, Hardware, Puzzle, Science, Art. Maybe you have another idea? Bring it!

    Microsoft New England Research & Development Center (NERD)

    One Memorial Drive Suite 100 · Cambridge, MA

    15 comments
  • Itertools and Encrypted bytecode
    Pizza sponsored by DataRobot (https://www.datarobot.com). Two talks tonight! Eugene Kovalev, Itertools Itertools is one of the treasure boxes of the Python standard library. It has tools for working with iteration of all kinds. We'll look at some of them, and at some interesting uses of them. Wolfgang Richter, Encrypted Bytecode This talk will explain how we modified the `import` statement of the Python language to import encrypted Python bytecode. We will explain the behind-the-scenes import machinery of Python, how we hooked into it, and how we typically distribute keys. You'll be able to experiment with our technique during the talk, and at home by using our recently open sourced library.

    Microsoft New England Research & Development Center (NERD)

    One Memorial Drive Suite 100 · Cambridge, MA

    13 comments
  • July Project Night
    Pizza sponsored by Quantopian (https://www.quantopian.com). Bring a laptop. Bring ideas. Bring questions. Bring enthusiasm. Bring friends. The Boston Python Project Night is a time to find others with compatible interests, and work away. Code, hack, teach, learn, meet, laugh, talk: anything goes at Project Night. You don't need to have a project, and you don't have to show anything to anyone! This is an opportunity to work together with like-minded people. That's it! All skill levels are welcome. There will be at least two tables of beginning learners, and helpers for them. Other table-topics in the past have been Django, Data, Web Scraping, Hardware, Puzzle, Science, Art. Maybe you have another idea? Bring it!

    Microsoft New England Research & Development Center (NERD)

    One Memorial Drive Suite 100 · Cambridge, MA

    5 comments
  • Physical Computing
    Pizza sponsored by Pluralsight (https://www.pluralsight.com), drinks after sponsored by Soroco (http://soroco.com). Two speakers on physical computing: tiny hardware running Python, controlling things like lights and motors, and reading data from things like buttons, temperature sensors, and accelerometers. Dan Halbert and Travis Bumgarner will discuss microprocessor and microcontroller boards like the Raspberry Pi and Adafruit Gemma. What can they do, how can you use them, how do they run Python? You can get involved, you can build things, and you can contribute! We'll be headed to Meadhall after the event for drinks sponsored by Soroco.

    Cambridge Innovation Center

    1 Broadway · Cambridge

    7 comments
  • Boston Python June Project Night
    Hosting and pizza provided by DataDog (https://www.datadoghq.com/). Bring a laptop. Bring ideas. Bring questions. Bring enthusiasm. Bring friends. The Boston Python Project Night is a time to find others with compatible interests, and work away. Code, hack, teach, learn, meet, laugh, talk: anything goes at Project Night. You don't need to have a project, and you don't have to show anything to anyone! This is an opportunity to work together with like-minded people. That's it! All skill levels are welcome. There will be at least two tables of beginning learners, and helpers for them. Other table-topics in the past have been Django, Data, Web Scraping, Hardware, Puzzle, Science, Art. Maybe you have another idea? Bring it!

    Data Dog Boston

    225 Franklin Street 24th Floor. · Boston, ma

    11 comments
  • Workshop: Foundations of Numerical Computing in Python
    This is a rehearsal for a PyCon tutorial. Please read the description carefully to decide whether it is right for you. Space is limited, so please only RSVP if you expect to attend. No food will be provided. Audience: This tutorial is intended for programmers with intermediate Python skills who want to improve their ability to use Python for numerical computing. Example participants might include: - Software engineers who work with Python but have had limited exposure to Python's numerical computing stack. - Data scientists who have used numpy and pandas and want to develop a deeper understanding of how those libraries work. By the end of this tutorial, students will learn the following skills: - Students will learn to apply techniques like vectorization, broadcasting, and fancy indexing to write fast, clear, and idiomatic numpy code. - Students will develop a mental model of how numpy arrays represent data. - Students will be able to recognize common pathological uses of numpy (e.g., looping over the elements of an array to calculate a sum) and will be able to replace these pathological uses with efficient alternatives. Requirements: Participants are strongly encouraged, but not required, to bring a laptop with wifi and a modern browser. The structure of the tutorial will be alternating 20-30 minute sessions of lectures and exercises, with the exercises hosted on a Jupyter Notebook server so no other software should be necessary for participants. Description: Foundations of Numerical Computing in Python Scott Sanderson Python is one of the world's most popular programming languages for numerical computing. In areas of application like physical simulation, signal processing, predictive analytics, and more, engineers and data scientists increasingly use Python as their primary tool for working with large-scale numerical data. Despite this diversity of application domains, almost all numerical programming in Python builds upon a small foundation of libraries. In particular, the numpy.ndarray is the core data structure for the entire PyData ecosystem, and the numpy library provides many of the foundational algorithms used to power more domain-specific libraries. The goal of this tutorial is to provide an introduction to numpy -- how it works, how it's used, and what problems it aims to solve. In particular, we will focus on building up students' mental model of how numpy works and how idiomatic usage of numpy allows us to implement algorithms much more efficiently than is possible in pure Python.

    MassChallenge

    21 Dry Dock Avenue, Floor 6 · Boston, MA

    15 comments