• Philosophical Economics: Full Reserve Banking and Positive Money.

    Good Space, 2nd Floor, Commercial Union House

    In our last session we explored the developments of Modern Monetary Theory and the political implications of the movement. This was the second of three sessions to consider where monetary theory is going beyond the present. This session aims to finish the thinking for the future theory. We have two topics, and two speakers, for this month: Ralph is returning to present on Full Reserve Banking, whereas Vince Richardson who is a local campaigner for Positive Money will be presenting the second half. Full Reserve Banking is a deceptively simple proposition: banks should not be allowed to create money. Instead of the typical view of our states coining our money it is instead the banks that construct the vast majority of it. This theory proposes to return monetary creation back to our governments, and thus limiting a bank’s ability to generate wealth from present tactics (e.g. Overdrafts). Positive Money (PoMo)is an independent, not for profit economic think tank that purposes a major reform to the way money is created in our economy to help eradicate bank crises such as the one we experienced in 2008. Positive Money proposes we adopt a full reserve style banking system that stops banks creating money out of thin air. In its place they propose “Sovereign Money” system that transfers money creation powers back to the exclusive control of the state, where it once belonged. Standard event information: • Topic: Full Reserve Banking and Positive Money. • Venue: Room 1 - Good Space – Commercial Union House (Floor two). • Date: Monday 18th January. • Time: 18:30-20:30 • Cost: Free; but a small donation of £2 is requested from those who can afford it, to recoup the charity’s (NPS) costs We meet on the 3rd Monday of the month. This is a monthly series and is aimed at allowing those who attend the opportunity to learn and debate the systems that guide our modern world, as well as the theories that made this world possible. These groups are designed to be open to all and will commence with a talk designed to open to discussion in the subsequent time. It should be stressed that this group will be discussing the theory of economics, not its practice, and thus should operate more like a philosophy/ arts/humanities discussion than a debate on scientific principles. Facilitator of group and contact details: Hannes Ingo Torbohm – [masked]

  • Women Philosophers

    The Northern Stage

    We meet on the 3rd Thursday of each month, focus on a woman philosopher each time. At the last meeting we decided to continue with Mary Midgley, in particular the chapter ‘What is matter?’ from her last book ‘What is philosophy for?’. However, any Mary Midgley writings will be welcome.

  • Cafe Philosophique: Who is Nietzsche?

    The 'Lit & Phil' Building

    One of the most important questions I ever received from an academic was: “Who’s Nietzsche?” The question implicitly points to the great difficulty in reading the eccentric philosopher: so many sections are contradictory, how to we demark the parts of his career, or should we take a single message from his works? This series will consider three different approaches to reading Nietzsche, and methods of understanding his importance – each of these readings is radically different. For the first talk we will be considering a period reading of Nietzsche from the Neo-Kantian Simmel. Simmel read Nietzsche while he was still alive, and published his work entitled Schopenhauer und Nietzsche only 7 years after his death. This text argues that Nietzsche failed to understand his own philosophical importance, and that he adds a much-needed individuality into a will-philosophy framework. Prior knowledge of Nietzsche, Simmel or Schopenhauer is not required. A note about the speaker, Hannes Torbohm: I am a third year undergraduate at Newcastle University in the Philosophy department. I am also running the Philosophical Economics group, with the funding and support of the Newcastle Philosophy Society board. I have completed research scholarships in Nietzsche and given talks on his relation to other fields several times before. Contact: [masked] A contribution of £2 is requested, for those attendees who can afford it, to cover the room hire costs. Reading for the session All reading is optional, however recommended to provide a more fruitful discussion. (READING) Chapter 7: Schopenhauer und Nietzsche (By G. Simmel): https://drive.google.com/open?id=1zC5DPh_hPkLQ0RiEjHnfkEYyzvbBW7E- This is a discussion of Simmel’s opening reading of Nietzsche and has a consideration of some of the key terms of the scholar. (EXTRA ONLY) Introduction on Simmel’s reading of Schopenhauer and Nietzsche (by H. Loiskandl, D Weinstein & M Weinstein): https://drive.google.com/open?id=1oX4WDiwtva09wlTJtkdieakalSGFpFfU This is a discussion of Simmel and his readings, why they are important to him and where we might take them forwards. I would only recommend this if you have a genuine interest in Simmel. (EXTRA NON-LINKED) There is a chapter of Postmodern(ized) Simmel (by D. Weinstein & M. Weinstein) called Simmel’s Nietzsche from which this talk will be heavily based. I would recommend finding this afterwards if you want more information Background Café Philosophique has been the flagship of the Newcastle Philosophy Society since its inception in 2003. More than the weekly study groups, it embodied the spirit of taking philosophy out of academe and into the domain of public interest, combining erudition and argumentation with wider participation, personal involvement, and broadening of scope to include all matters of interest and concern to a growing diversity of individuals and the public at large. The model of Café Philosophique, as implied by its title, is based on a popular movement in France over the past half century, where people with an interest in philosophy gathered in cafés or similar venues, and took turns to introduce a theme or topic for collaborative reflection and discussion. On occasion, an invited speaker would be invited to focus the debate or draw people’s attention to a particular subject beyond their immediate grasp. For a number of years, Café Philosophique at the Newcastle Philosophy Society has drawn on the seemingly inexhaustible knowledge and expertise of its regular members. It has also benefited from a range of contributions by guest speakers from university departments and elsewhere. Café Philosophique currently meets on the 1st Saturday of the month at 2 pm (about 6 times a year), as well as on some Saturday mornings – please refer to the NPS Meetup page.

  • Philosophical Explorations

    Lit and Phil

    Philosophical Explorations aims to apply philosophical thought and method to any subject matter or topic of concern to society or observant individuals within it. The idea is to approach any aspect of life, wearing a philosophical hat as it were, that is applying a measure of argumentation and justification, adhering to reason and logical precision, making use of cumulative philosophical thinking over the ages, broadening each subject to its full implications above and beyond particularities and contingencies, seeking that which underpins opinion by unravelling undisclosed basic assumptions and formulating an underlying existential position in life. Above all, Philosophical Explorations invites us to subject our stand to a dialogue with others, by opening up a space in the mind as a precondition of careful and considerate listening, an ongoing examination of our opinion in relation to that of others, a willingness and readiness to allow one's own stand to incorporate, indeed be transformed, by the growing wisdom of the group in the process of philosophical exchange. What is therefore desirable in this group is a philosophical attitude and an openness of mind. The most commonly accepted definition of philosophy is that of “thinking about thinking”, that is a double move at the outset, where all reflections are simultaneously subjected to meta-reflections. This habit of mind, whilst not intuitive or normative in society, is at the very core and an indispensable attribute of Philosophical Explorations. Everyone is welcome to join in. A contribution of £2 is requested, for those attendees who can afford it, to cover the room hire costs.

  • Philosophy In Pubs

    The Cumberland Arms

    A friendly philosophical saunter, based on Liverpool’s popular “Philosophy In Pubs.” Anyone can bring a question, and the group will vote and discuss the most popular one each time. People of all levels of knowledge and interest are welcome. We meet on the 2nd and 4th Tuesday of each month.

  • Philosophical Economics

    Good Space, 2nd Floor, Commercial Union House

    Philosophical Economics We meet on the 3rd Monday of the month. This is a monthly series and is aimed at allowing those who attend the opportunity to learn and debate the systems that guide our modern world, as well as the theories that made this world possible. These groups are designed to be open to all and will commence with a talk designed to open to discussion in the subsequent time. It should be stressed that this group will be discussing the theory of economics, not its practice, and thus should operate more like a philosophy/ arts/humanities discussion than a debate on scientific principles. Facilitator of group and contact details: Hannes Ingo Torbohm – [masked]

  • Women Philosophers

    The Northern Stage

    We meet on the 3rd Thursday of each month, covering a different woman philosopher each time.

  • Philosophical Explorations

    The 'Lit & Phil' Building

    Philosophical Explorations aims to apply philosophical thought and method to any subject matter or topic of concern to society or observant individuals within it. The idea is to approach any aspect of life, wearing a philosophical hat as it were, that is applying a measure of argumentation and justification, adhering to reason and logical precision, making use of cumulative philosophical thinking over the ages, broadening each subject to its full implications above and beyond particularities and contingencies, seeking that which underpins opinion by unravelling undisclosed basic assumptions and formulating an underlying existential position in life. Above all, Philosophical Explorations invites us to subject our stand to a dialogue with others, by opening up a space in the mind as a precondition of careful and considerate listening, an ongoing examination of our opinion in relation to that of others, a willingness and readiness to allow one's own stand to incorporate, indeed be transformed, by the growing wisdom of the group in the process of philosophical exchange. What is therefore desirable in this group is a philosophical attitude and an openness of mind. The most commonly accepted definition of philosophy is that of “thinking about thinking”, that is a double move at the outset, where all reflections are simultaneously subjected to meta-reflections. This habit of mind, whilst not intuitive or normative in society, is at the very core and an indispensable attribute of Philosophical Explorations. Everyone is welcome to join in. We meet on the 2nd and 4th Saturday of each month. A contribution of £2 is requested, for those attendees who can afford it, to cover the room hire costs.

  • On Philosophy Lecture Series: Vices of the Mind

    Lit and Phil

    As part of our ongoing collaboration with Bigg Books we are delighted to announce​ the return of our bi-annual lecture series, with a season of talks focused on helping us navigate the challenges of modern life. The season begins with Quassim Cassam's talk, Vices of the Mind: We all like to think of ourselves as open-minded, reasonable and realistic. But evidence from history, psychology and philosophy suggests that we are probably deluding ourselves. Our thinking is heavily influenced by intellectual vices like closed-mindedness, overconfidence, wishful thinking and prejudice. This talk will be about these vices of the mind. What are they, what's so bad about them, and what can we do to control them? Vices of the mind make it harder for us to know and understand the world we live in. Perhaps they aren't always harmful but usually they are. Unfortunately, we are bad at recognizing our own intellectual vices and self-improvement is hard. But there is hope. Self-improvement is possible if we learn to know ourselves and are committed to doing better. Quassim Cassam is Professor of Philosophy at Warwick University and one of Britain’s most distinguished philosophers. £5 admission (£3 students/unwaged), or £20 Season Pass (£10 students/unwaged) Further information: www.biggbooks.co.uk

  • Philosophy In Pubs

    The Cumberland Arms

    A friendly philosophical saunter, based on Liverpool’s popular “Philosophy In Pubs.” Anyone can bring a question, and the group will vote and discuss the most popular one each time. People of all levels of knowledge and interest are welcome. We meet on the 2nd and 4th Tuesday of each month.