• Toma Morris on CRaft: An Erasure-coding-supported Version of Raft

    Greetings Papers We Love NYC and welcome to our second remote meetup! This month we have a talk by Toma Morris on CRaft: An Erasure-coding-supported Version of Raft for Reducing Storage Cost and Network Cost. Check below for the details and links to the papers! *** PLEASE NOTE: Even though this is a remote event, the Papers We Love code of conduct is still in effect in any chatrooms or forums associated with the meetup. Breaching the CoC is grounds to be ejected from the meetup at the organizers' discretion. *** *** CRaft: An Erasure-coding-supported Version of Raft for Reducing Storage Cost and Network Cost *** Authors: Zizhong Wang, Tongliang Li, Haixia Wang, Airan Shao, Yunren Bai, Shangming Cai, Zihan Xu, and Dongsheng Wang, Tsinghua University This paper discusses a method for using erasure codes (specifically Reed-Solomon codes) to encode data stored in a Raft cluster to reduce the volume of storage and network traffic, while maintaining the failure-tolerance guarantees that Raft provides. We will briefly discuss the basics of Raft and erasure codes, and then talk through practical examples of how the cluster encodes, stores, and reconstructs data during different failure scenarios. Paper: https://www.usenix.org/system/files/fast20-wang_zizhong.pdf *** Speaker Bio *** Toma is a software engineering manager with the Trust and Safety team at Hinge where they and their team work to prevent scams, harassment, and violence. They have also worked in robotics, AI, medical devices, and various other kinds of projects. Toma studied both Electrical Engineering and History, and is as interested in talking about the early Islamic empire as in distributed systems.

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  • David Ashby on Understanding Real-World Concurrency Bugs in Go

    Greetings Papers We Love NYC and welcome to our first remote meetup! This month we have a talk by David Ashby on Understanding Real-World Concurrency Bugs in Go. Check below for the details and links to the papers! *** PLEASE NOTE: Even though this is a remote event, the Papers We Love code of conduct is still in effect in any chatrooms or forums associated with the meetup. Breaching the CoC is grounds to be ejected from the meetup at the organizers' discretion. *** *** Understanding Real-World Concurrency Bugs in Go. *** Authors: Tengfei Tu, Xiaoyu Liu, Linhai Song, and Yiying Zhang This paper investigates whether go’s message-passing channel model leads to programmers making fewer concurrency mistakes by examining six real-world large-scale go code bases to see what sort of bugs they have to fix in practice. We’ll review the paper’s research and conclusions, dig into some of the code examples to make sure we understand how the various classes of bugs work, and take some side journeys into the history and influence of Hoare’s Communicating Sequential Processes, what happens when empirical research falls into the hands of its subjects, and the cutest little bunny mascot ever. Paper: https://songlh.github.io/paper/go-study.pdf Communicating Sequential Processes: https://www.cs.cmu.edu/~crary/819-f09/Hoare78.pdf *** Speaker Bio *** David Ashby is a “Senior Systems Engineer” at SageSure Insurance, which means he works on distributed authentication and authorization services all day. Lucky him! He’s also an organizer of Papers We Love NYC and PWLConf and previously gave a lightning talk at PWLNYC on implementing toy versions of SHA1 and SHA256 in Ruby (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KWH7HmvmQ6o). Not bad for an English major who dropped out of his first college. When not fighting with computers, he posts pictures of his cat Cricket on Instagram.

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  • Dan Bentley on Build Systems & Catherine Holloway on The Mathematics of Origami

    *** PLEASE NOTE: You _must_ have your real name on your account _and_ provide a photo ID at the entrance to attend, per the venue rules. Reminder: Papers We Love has a code of conduct. Breaching that CoC is grounds to be ejected from the meetup at the organizers' discretion. *** Greetings Papers We Love NYC, This month we have a pair of talks prepared! To open we have a lightning talk with Catherine Holloway on 'The Mathematics of Origami', followed by Dan Bentley on 'Build Systems a la Carte'. Check below for the details and links to the papers! *** Build Systems a la Carte, presented by Dan Bentley *** Authors: Andrey Mokhov, Neil Mitchell, Simon Peyton Jones I love this paper because it explores a topic that rarely gets academic attention: build systems (such as Make). It takes a confused landscape and finds a meta-model that even the authors of those tools didn't comprehend. It makes a convincing argument that Excel (!!) is a build system. And it does it all with a healthy dose of functional programming/category theory. I'll try to recap the paper, in terminology and figures that can make sense to users, not just functional programmers. I'll also try and lay out unexplored territory and questions I'm left with. Paper: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/research/uploads/prod/2018/03/build-systems.pdf *** Speaker Bio *** Dan Bentley is a Software Engineer who's currently CEO of Tilt. Tilt's a startup building a Distributed Developer Experience, aka Make for Microservices. Previously, he worked at Google on a build tool that was a predecessor to Bazel, Open Source, and Google Sheets. He's opened for The Who and has received two checks from Donald Knuth. *** The Mathematics of Origami presented by Catherine Holloway *** Author: David A. Huffman Origami designs can produce an amazing diversity of 3-dimensional shapes from a 2-dimensional piece of paper without cuts or glue. In the late 70s, David Huffman (of the Huffman Coding algorithm used in JPEG compression) showed how the same mathematical techniques used for quantifying the amount of charge in an arbitrary electric field, the Gaussian Sphere, can be used to prove which individual vertices in a crease pattern are possible from a simple piece of paper. Determining valid crease patterns has applications to computer graphics, materials science, and design. Paper: http://www.organicorigami.com/thrackle/class/hon394/papers/HuffmanCurvatureAndCreases.pdf *** Speaker Bio *** Catherine Holloway is an SRE in finance. She previously gave a lightning talk about algorithms for lawn mowing, which has applications in computerized embroidery. She is about to become a mother and has already acquired the inevitable closet full of unused crafting supplies and equipment. --- Venue: Datadog 620 8th Ave, 45th Floor New York, NY 10018 USA Doors open at 6:30pm EST ---

  • Sean T. Allen on Deny Capabilities for Safe, Fast Actors

    *** PLEASE NOTE: You _must_ have your real name on your account _and_ provide a photo ID at the entrance to attend, per the venue rules. Reminder: Papers We Love has a code of conduct. Breaching that CoC is grounds to be ejected from the meetup at the organizers' discretion. *** "Deny Capabilities for Safe, Fast Actors (2015)" by Sylvan Clebsch et al. lays out the core novel idea behind the Pony programming language: reference capabilities. Reference capabilities take object capabilities, turn them on their head and then apply them to variable aliases. Not sure what that means? Come on out to Papers We Love, where Sean T. Allen (member of the Pony core team) will explain Deny Capabilities and how Pony combines them with an actor based model -- to provide a programming environment that allows for data-race freedom and fearless concurrency. - Paper: http://soft.vub.ac.be/AGERE15/papers/AGERE_2015_paper_10.pdf - Pony: https://www.ponylang.io/ ---- **Speaker Bio** Sean T. Allen is a member of the core team for the Pony programming language and an all-around swell fella. --- Venue: Datadog 620 8th Ave, 45th Floor New York, NY 10018 USA Doors open at 6:30pm EST --- **Talks are always recorded on video and released ~2 weeks after the meetup.** We hope that you'll read some of the papers and references before the meetup, but don't stress if you can't. If you have any questions, thoughts, or related information, please visit #pwlnyc (https://paperswelove.slack.com/messages/pwlnyc/) on slack (http://papersweloveslack.herokuapp.com/), our GitHub repository (https://github.com/papers-we-love/papers-we-love), or add to the discussion on this event's thread.

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  • Life Beyond Distributed Transactions / Space-efficient Static Trees and Graphs

    *** PLEASE NOTE: You _must_ have your real name on your account _and_ provide a photo ID at the entrance to attend, per the venue rules. *** We've got two talks for you this evening! Jonathan Brown will present Life Beyond Distributed Transactions by Pat Helland. Paper: http://www-db.cs.wisc.edu/cidr/cidr2007/papers/cidr07p15.pdf This paper explores and names some of the practical approaches used in the implementations of large-scale mission-critical applications in a world which rejects distributed transactions. Jonathan Brown is a software engineer at Wallaroo Labs (https://www.wallaroolabs.com/), a role that has allowed him to explore and learn about many interesting problems in the distributed systems space. --- Vaibhav Sagar will present Space-efficient Static Trees and Graphs by Guy Jacobsen. Paper: https://www.computer.org/csdl/proceedings-article/focs/1989/063533/12OmNx2QUHQ In this era of bountiful disk space and unlimited cloud storage, it seems ridiculous to claim that data takes up too much of it. But it does! In this 1989 paper, Guy Jacobson (whose PhD thesis is credited with creating this field of research) introduces a set of techniques to create what he calls "succinct data structures", which approach the information-theoretical lower bound for space usage while still allowing useful operations to be performed on the resulting representation. They accomplish this by getting rid of pointers for linking data and operating directly at the bit level. These techniques are used to encode trees and planar graphs, and although the details have changed in the last 30 years, the fundamental concepts are very much the same and still the focus of active research. Vaibhav (@vbhvsgr | https://twitter.com/vbhvsgr) used to write web applications for a living. He still does, but he used to, too. When he’s not doing that he yells about functional programming and package managers on Twitter, re-racks bumper plates after using them, and trawls the internet for the finest space disco. --- Venue: Datadog 620 8th Ave, 45th Floor New York, NY 10018 USA Doors open at 6:30pm EST --- **Talks are always recorded on video and released ~2 weeks after the meetup.** We hope that you'll read some of the papers and references before the meetup, but don't stress if you can't. If you have any questions, thoughts, or related information, please visit #pwlnyc (https://paperswelove.slack.com/messages/pwlnyc/) on slack (http://papersweloveslack.herokuapp.com/), our GitHub repository (https://github.com/papers-we-love/papers-we-love), or add to the discussion on this event's thread.

  • Lightning Round!

    Datadog

    **Note that this meetup has MOVED to Datadog at 620 8th Ave (across from Port Authority)! You _must_ have your real name on your account _and_ provide a photo ID at the entrance to attend, per the venue rules.** ----- We've got a special edition of Papers We Love tonight as we round up a gang of speakers for Lightning Talks! Each speakers will present for 15 - 20m on a topic dear to their heart related to computers. We're still filling out the list of talks but you can see some of them below: * Talk: Approximation Algorithms for Lawn Mowing and Milling - http://www.ams.sunysb.edu/~jsbm/papers/lawn-mow-cgta.pdf Catherine Holloway almost completed a PhD in experimental quantum optics at the University of Waterloo's Institute for Quantum Computing but dropped out to work at a few robotics and quantum computing startups. She currently lives in Manhattan and is an SRE at Bloomberg. * Talk: Branch Prediction and the Performance of Interpreters - Don't Trust Folklore (Erven Rohou, Bharath Narasimha Swamy, André Seznec, 2015). https://hal.inria.fr/hal-01100647/document Max Marrone is a recent computer science graduate whose other interests include aviation and design. He aspires to someday be able to transfer laundry from the washer to the dryer without accidentally dropping wet clothing all over the dirty floor * Talk: The Sensitivity Conjecture Solved! http://www.mathcs.emory.edu/~hhuan30/papers/sensitivity_1.pdf Homin Lee has a PhD in computational learning theory, and is currently a data scientist at Datadog. * Talk: Flipping Bits in Memory Without Accessing Them: An Experimental Study of DRAM Disturbance Errors (Yoongu Kim, Ross Daly, Jeremie Kim, Chris Fallin, Ji Hye Lee, Donghyuk Lee, Chris Wilkerson, Konrad Lai, Onur Mutlu) - http://users.ece.cmu.edu/~yoonguk/papers/kim-isca14.pdf Andrew Gross graduated with a degree in Applied Physics and the knowledge that he did not want to pursue a career in it. He currently lives in Queens and works as a Staff Engineer at YipitData. --- Venue: Datadog 620 8th Ave, 45th Floor New York, NY 10018 USA 7pm --- **Talks are always recorded on video and released ~2 weeks after the meetup.** We hope that you'll read some of the papers and references before the meetup, but don't stress if you can't. If you have any questions, thoughts, or related information, please visit #pwlnyc (https://paperswelove.slack.com/messages/pwlnyc/) on slack (http://papersweloveslack.herokuapp.com/), our GitHub repository (https://github.com/papers-we-love/papers-we-love), or add to the discussion on this event's thread.

  • Elizabeth Ramirez on Transition Matrix Estimation

    Eleven Times Square Microsoft Conference Center

    Note that this meetup has MOVED from Two Sigma to Microsoft Reactor at 11 Times Square (42nd and 8th)! You _must_ have your real name on your account _and_ provide a photo ID at the entrance to attend, per the venue rules. ----- Elizabeth Ramirez will be presenting the paper "Transition Matrix Estimation in High Dimensional Time Series" (http://proceedings.mlr.press/v28/han13a.pdf). About the Paper: The state-transition matrix $A$ is a matrix you use to propagate the state vector over time, i.e. $x_{t+1} = Ax_{t} + Bu$. It usually comes from the equations that describe the system, but if you don’t know the dynamics of your system or the system is stochastic, this matrix has to be estimated. This paper presents multiple methods to estimate this matrix for high-dimensional VAR time series. ---- Speaker: Elizabeth Ramirez is an Electrical Engineer and Applied Mathematician. I'm an Applied Scientist at Descartes Labs, where I solve very large linear systems that model complex systems, like transportation. https://twitter.com/eramirem ---- You'll have to check-in with security with your Name/ID. Definitely sign-up if you’re going to attend–unfortunately people whose names aren’t entered into the security system in advance won’t be allowed in. After Elizabeth's presentation, we will open up the floor to discussion and questions. **Talks are always recorded on video and released ~2 weeks after the meetup.** We hope that you'll read some of the papers and references before the meetup, but don't stress if you can't. If you have any questions, thoughts, or related information, please visit #pwlnyc (https://paperswelove.slack.com/messages/pwlnyc/) on slack (http://papersweloveslack.herokuapp.com/), our GitHub repository (https://github.com/papers-we-love/papers-we-love), or add to the discussion on this event's thread.

  • John Langford on Real World Reinforcement Learning

    We are excited to host John Langford speaking on Real World Reinforcement Learning Talk: We’ve created a dozen real world reinforcement learning deployments enabling use cases around contextual personalization and contextual optimization culminating in the new Cognitive Services Personalizer (https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/services/cognitive-services/personalizer/) which makes these techniques available to the world on a mass scale. I’ll discuss the key technology (and papers) behind this along with the possibilities that it allows. Amongst other things, the counterfactual evaluation system we’ve created makes optimization over policies radically faster and friendlier than A/B testing. Bio: John Langford is a machine learning research scientist, a field which he says "is shifting from an academic discipline to an industrial tool". He is the author of the weblog http://hunch.net/ and the principal developer of Vowpal Wabbit (http://hunch.net/~vw/). John works at Microsoft Research New York, of which he was one of the founding members. ---- Details: **Doors open at 6:30 pm**; the presentations will begin right around 7:00 pm; and, yes, there will be refreshments of all kinds and pizza. You'll have to check-in with security with your Name/ID. Definitely sign-up if you’re going to attend–unfortunately people whose names aren’t entered into the security system in advance won’t be allowed in. After John's presentation, we will open up the floor to discussion and questions. **Talks are always recorded on video and released ~2 weeks after the meetup.** We hope that you'll read some of the papers and references before the meetup, but don't stress if you can't. If you have any questions, thoughts, or related information, please visit #pwlnyc (https://paperswelove.slack.com/messages/pwlnyc/) on slack (http://papersweloveslack.herokuapp.com/), our GitHub repository (https://github.com/papers-we-love/papers-we-love), or add to the discussion on this event's thread.

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  • John Valois on Wait-Free Synchronization

    Two Sigma

    We are excited to host John Valois speaking on Wait-Free Synchronization Talk: How do we implement data structures in a shared memory environment? The conventional answer is to use mutual exclusion, but this approach does not behave well when we encounter delays or failures in the critical section, forcing other processes to wait. Wait-Free Synchronization by Maurice Herlihy (https://cs.brown.edu/~mph/Herlihy91/p124-herlihy.pdf) explores an idea which ensures that operations complete in finite time regardless of the relative speeds of other processes. We’ll see a connection to the ubiquitous consensus problem and a framework for understanding what synchronization primitives are necessary and sufficient for implementing a given object, culminating in a method for implementing any object in a wait-free manner. Bio: John Valois is a Managing Director at BlackRock where he works on core platform engineering. ---- Details: **Doors open at 6:30 pm**; the presentations will begin right around 7:00 pm; and, yes, there will be refreshments of all kinds and pizza. You'll have to check-in with security with your Name/ID. Definitely sign-up if you’re going to attend–unfortunately people whose names aren’t entered into the security system in advance won’t be allowed in. After John's presentation, we will open up the floor to discussion and questions. **Talks are always recorded on video and released ~2 weeks after the meetup.** We hope that you'll read some of the papers and references before the meetup, but don't stress if you can't. If you have any questions, thoughts, or related information, please visit #pwlnyc (https://paperswelove.slack.com/messages/pwlnyc/) on slack (http://papersweloveslack.herokuapp.com/), our GitHub repository (https://github.com/papers-we-love/papers-we-love), or add to the discussion on this event's thread.