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Aye-Aye Captain: A Primatologist's­ Tales of Lemurs in Madagascar

- This lecture is a production of the Fernbank Museum of Natural History and is suitable for ages 10 and up.
- It is free and open to the public.
- Reservations are recommended.
- Call [masked] to make a reservation. (Visit the Fernbank event page if the phone number appears masked.) 
- Tickets for admission to the Museum or to the IMAX® Theatre must be purchased separately.
- Check in at the Museum's ticketing window when you arrive.
- Lecture-only guests will be seated at 3:45 pm.
__________

Aye-Aye Captain: A Primatologist's Tales of Lemurs in Madagascar

Sarah Zohdy, PhD
Department of Environmental Health
Rollins School of Public Health
Emory University

Brown mouse lemur (Microcebus rufus), courtesy of Sarah Zohdy
__________

The island of Madagascar is home to some of the strangest animals on the planet. Perhaps some of the most well-known residents are lemurs, small primates only found on the island.

Join Sarah Zohdy, who has spent nearly a decade studying these fascinating and adorable creatures, to hear first-hand tales of the smallest primate in the world (the mouse lemur), the most endangered in the world (the greater bamboo lemur), and what is possibly the oddest looking creature on the planet (the aye-aye). Find out about Madagascar’s complex biodiversity and how conservation efforts are making a difference for lemurs and other island residents.

Presented in conjunction with the film Island of Lemurs: Madagascar, now showing in Fernbank’s IMAX® Theatre.

This lecture is made possible by a generous gift from Marty and John Gillin in honor of Carter and Hampton Morris.

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  • Kathy

    Very interesting presentation. Lovely pictures. I'm so impressed by the great lengths and personal discomforts that researchers (including this brave soul) are willing to go through in order to gather the data they need out in the field. I think for me, one leech bite would have been enough to scare me off, never mind 200 at a time!

    1 · May 5, 2014

  • Susan T.

    I-20 and the side roads will be too congested.

    May 3, 2014

  • Jonathan M.

    I called and got my ticket this morning.

    1 · May 2, 2014

  • A former member
    A former member

    Looking forward to it.

    April 30, 2014

  • Kathleen

    Just talked wi feedback - there are still tickets available

    1 · April 30, 2014

  • Marc M.

    Just a quick comment to remind people who have RSVPed here that they should call Fernbank [masked]) to reserve a seat for this lecture.

    You can also visit the webpage for the event to find out how to make a reservation.

    http://fernbankmuseum.org/calendar-of-events/lecture-a-primatologist

    April 29, 2014

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