What we're about

Science on Tap is a science lecture series where you can sit back, enjoy a pint, and laugh while you learn. Listen to experts talk about the science in your neighborhood and around the world. You don’t have to be a science geek to have fun—all you need is a thirst for knowledge!

Upcoming events (3)

Koala: A Natural History and an Uncertain Future

Needs a location

TO REGISTER: Sign up with GiveLively
Then register on Zoom with the link provided in the confirmation email.
(YouTube live link below.)

EVENT DESCRIPTION:
From their ancient ancestors, to their relationship with humans (it's complicated), to their current threats, this Science on Tap investigates the remarkable koala.

Despite their iconic status and celebrity, koalas remain something of a mystery. Often affectionate in captivity, they seek out human assistance when in need of water or care yet can also be fierce and belligerent. They are beloved worldwide and feature in popular children's stories, but are also plagued by sexually transmitted diseases and maligned for a lack of intelligence. Their diet consists solely of leaves that are full of toxins. In some states they are threatened with extinction, while in others they are dying from overpopulation.

In Koala: A Natural History and an Uncertain Future, Australian author and biologist Danielle Clode delves into the world of koalas to discover what's behind the sweet face on thousands of postcards. From their megafaunal ancestors to the disastrous effects of colonization, from remarkable conservation success in the 1920s to the devastating bushfires of[masked], Clode tells the story of koalas and their complex relationship with humans. Sharing the latest scientific insights and myth-busting facts, all woven through Clode's award-winning storytelling, Koala takes readers up into the trees to reveal the truth about this extraordinary animal and what must be done to ensure its survival.
Preorder your copy (out January 2023) today!
(Auto-generated captioning available)

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Written questions during the event are welcome!
TWO WAYS TO WATCH LIVE:

  1. Zoom: Sign up with GiveLively here
    THEN:
    Register on Zoom with the link provided in the confirmation email.

  2. YouTube live: go to our channel at 7pm on Thursday (refresh until you see the video post)

COST:
Free, with a $5 -15 suggested donation
Make a one-time donation to Make You Think, Inc:
OR
If you are able, please support us on Patreon:
WATCH LATER:

Visit the Science On Tap website

Holy Crap That’s Cool! Behind-the-Scenes of OPB’s “All Science. No Fiction”

COST:
$15 general admission
$35 VIP (includes premium seating)
$45 Supporter (includes premium seating & pint glass)
$10 Student

TIME: (in person:) Doors at 6pm, Meetup Group at 6:30pm, Event starts at 7pm.
TICKETS: Get tickets

EVENT DESCRIPTION:
Making a video series as fun as “All Science. No Fiction” takes a dash of ingenuity, a splash of whimsy plus a full jigger of “how do we pull this off? Join the stage show as the makers behind OPB’s new science series show you how they stop-motion your sleep cycle, tackle the spirits of the bug-drone, and otherwise bring joy to your science-video experience. The show launches a new season soon but why wait? They want to hear and share with you now! Expect volunteers from the audience and prizes for participation!

All Science. No Fiction.” uses whimsy, curiosity, and fun to place a spotlight on PNW scientists and the work they’re doing. These stories are about new marvels of technology, cutting-edge solutions and inventions, and grand ideas that pass the HCTC (Holy Crap That’s Cool!) test. How do they pull off all the different things they do on camera to try to get you as excited about science in the Pacific Northwest as they are?

Jes Burns and Brandon Swanson are the production team behind “All Science. No Fiction.” Jes is a science reporter and producer for OPB’s Science & Environment unit. Brandon is a videographer and editor, working on OPB shows like Oregon Field Guide. They’ve worked in some places, won some awards, and really dig scientists and making videos about their work.

In-person show only. This show is a repeat (though with some add-ons!) from the Alberta Rose show in September 2021.

COVID POLICY
Verbal vaccine confirmation required; masks encouraged.

How Do Scientists See Black Holes?

Needs a location

TO REGISTER: Sign up with GiveLively
Then register on Zoom with the link provided in the confirmation email.
TIME: 7pm
COST: (see below)

EVENT DESCRIPTION:
If light can’t escape from black holes, how do we know where they are and what they’re doing?

Black holes get their name because their gravity is so strong that not even light can escape, so they look black to us. However, we still know where lots of them are. Scientists can find and study black holes from the effects they have on the space environment around them. In this talk, astronomer Dr. Abbie Stevens tells us about the ways of finding black holes and learning more about their extreme physics.

Dr. Abbie Stevens is an NSF Astronomy & Astrophysics Postdoctoral Fellow. She studies black holes and neutron stars, and is involved in X-ray space telescopes, science advising on creative projects, open-source software development, astronomy data science, science literacy education, and mental health initiatives in academia.

Auto-generated captioning available

**********
Written questions during the event are welcome!
TWO WAYS TO WATCH LIVE:

  1. Zoom: Sign up with GiveLively here
    THEN:
    Register on Zoom with the link provided in the confirmation email.
  2. YouTube live: go to our channel at 7pm on Thursday (refresh until you see the video post)

COST:
Free, with a $5 -15 suggested donation
Make a one-time donation to Make You Think, Inc:
OR
If you are able, please support us on Patreon

Visit the Science On Tap website

Past events (265)

Your Brain on Pleasure and In Love: A Discussion and Concert

Aladdin Theater

Photos (248)

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