• The Science of Adult Attachment: Understanding our Patterns in Relationships

    COST: $15-45
    TIME: Doors at 6pm, Meetup Group at 6:30pm, Event starts at 7pm.
    TICKETS: Get tickets!

    EVENT DESCRIPTION:
    We all have an attachment style that impacts how we behave and feel in relationships. Though attachment styles are formed during childhood, awareness of our attachment style and tendencies can support the development of a healthy relationship through adulthood.

    At this Science on Tap, Leah Haas, a mental health provider and sex educator, will discuss how each attachment style develops and the behaviors associated with them so participants can walk away with ideas to make their relationships more secure and satisfying.

    Leah Haas (she/her) works in mental health as a Licensed Clinical Social Worker (LCSW) specializing in sexuality and gender at Inner Awareness Therapy. She works in youth sexual health for the State of Oregon and is a co-founder of Beyond the Talk which provides sex education to adults. In her free time, Leah loves backpacking, music, and hanging out with her dog Leto.

    COVID Policy:
    Verbal vaccine confirmation required; masks encouraged.

    WATCH LATER:
    The event will be recorded and available to watch online later on our Patreon page.

    Visit the Science On Tap website

    2
  • Neuroscience of Pleasure: How Your Brain Responds to Music, Love, and Chocolate

    Patricia Reser Center for the Arts

    $40.00

    TICKETS: Get tickets!

    EVENT DESCRIPTION:
    What happens in the brain when we fall in love or when love goes awry? Does chocolate activate the same brain chemistry as someone we can’t stop thinking about?

    At this special Valentine’s Day event, Dr. Larry Sherman, neuroscientist at OHSU, and singer/songwriter/pianist Naomi LaViolette, along with the Portland Chamber Orchestra, answer these and other questions about pleasure and love. Learn how neurochemical changes can have major effects on our behaviors—how we love, what we love, and who we love.

    It's a multi-media concert and lecture mixing music (ranging from Puccini to Sondheim), humor, and neuroscience in an unforgettable evening!

    Note: this event is located at:
    The Patricia Reser Center for the Arts
    12625 SW Crescent Street, Beaverton, OR 97005

    COST: $40 General Admission (+$4 fees)
    $35 Senior (+$4 fees)
    $15 Student (+$4 fees)

    TICKETS: Get tickets!

  • How Do Scientists See Black Holes?

    Needs a location

    TO REGISTER: Sign up with GiveLively
    Then register on Zoom with the link provided in the confirmation email.
    TIME: 7pm
    COST: (see below)

    EVENT DESCRIPTION:
    If light can’t escape from black holes, how do we know where they are and what they’re doing?

    Black holes get their name because their gravity is so strong that not even light can escape, so they look black to us. However, we still know where lots of them are. Scientists can find and study black holes from the effects they have on the space environment around them. In this talk, astronomer Dr. Abbie Stevens tells us about the ways of finding black holes and learning more about their extreme physics.

    Dr. Abbie Stevens is an NSF Astronomy & Astrophysics Postdoctoral Fellow. She studies black holes and neutron stars, and is involved in X-ray space telescopes, science advising on creative projects, open-source software development, astronomy data science, science literacy education, and mental health initiatives in academia.

    Auto-generated captioning available

    **********
    Written questions during the event are welcome!
    TWO WAYS TO WATCH LIVE:

    1. Zoom: Sign up with GiveLively here
      THEN:
      Register on Zoom with the link provided in the confirmation email.
    2. YouTube live: go to our channel at 7pm on Thursday (refresh until you see the video post)

    COST:
    Free, with a $5 -15 suggested donation
    Make a one-time donation to Make You Think, Inc:
    OR
    If you are able, please support us on Patreon

    Visit the Science On Tap website

  • The Mystique of Terroir: Geology and Wine

    Alberta Rose Theatre

    $25.00

    TICKETS: Get tickets!

    EVENT DESCRIPTION:

    ter·roir/tɛrˈwɑr;
    noun
    Definition: the environmental conditions, especially soil and climate, in which grapes are grown and that give a wine its unique flavor and aroma.

    The Willamette Valley has a certain je ne sais quoi, no? What special quality of the region’s terroir yields such exceptional wines? How do the soil, climate, and conditions lend themselves to lovely Pinot Noirs, but not Cabernets or Merlots? How does the region’s geologic past affect where and how to grow grapes? How do Washington and Oregon compare to other wine-growing regions in the United States and other countries around the world?

    Join us as Dr. Scott Burns, professor of geology and past chair of the Department of Geology at PSU, and wine enthusiast, tells us about all this and more about what makes a vineyard successful.

    COVID POLICY
    Verbal vaccine confirmation required; masks encouraged.

    COST:
    $45.00 SUPPORTER: Premium seating, pint glass, and good feelings for supporting the program
    $35.00 VIP: Premium seating in the front several rows of the center section
    $25.00 GENERAL ADMISSION
    $15.00 STUDENT

    TICKETS: Get tickets!

    WATCH LATER:
    The event will be recorded and available to watch online later on our Patreon page.
    Visit the Science On Tap website

  • Why Poop is the Golden Ticket for Killer Whale Research

    Kiggins Theatre

    $20.00

    EVENT DESCRIPTION:
    How do scientists learn about the health and diet of whales and dolphins when these species are often hidden in the ocean depths?

    Thanks to rapid developments in genetic technologies (e.g. feces and environmental DNA (eDNA)), scientists have an ever-growing, noninvasive toolkit to look at what these leviathans are feeding on. They’re piecing together a picture of who ate what and helping to fill in some of the questions plaguing managers and conservationists focused on the endangered Southern Resident killer whales, including stock structure, diet, health, and genetic fitness.

    Dr. Kim Parsons will describe her journey into the world of whale poop and how she’s using molecular genetics to help managers prioritize goals to support the recovery of the iconic Southern Resident killer whales. At this Science on Tap, learn how whale poop is providing amazing insights into killer whales and their prey.

    Kim Parsons, Ph.D. leads the Molecular Genetics team in the Conservation Biology Division at the Northwest Fisheries Science Center (NOAA Fisheries) in Seattle, WA. Kim is a molecular ecologist focusing on the development and application of genetic and genomic tools to support the conservation and management of marine species. Kim works closely with academic, non-profit and federal partners on research spanning many species and many oceans.

    COVID POLICY
    Verbal vaccine confirmation required; masks encouraged.

    COST: $20 general admission
    $35 VIP (includes premium seating)
    $45 Supporter (includes premium seating & pint glass)
    $15 Student

    TICKETS: Get tickets!

  • Partial Truths: How Fractions Distort Our Thinking

    Alberta Rose Theatre

    $25.00

    EVENT DESCRIPTION:

    A fast-food chain once tried to compete with McDonald’s quarter-pounder by introducing a third-pound hamburger—only for it to flop when consumers thought a third-pound was less than a quarter-pound because three is less than four.

    Separately, a rash of suicides by teenagers who played Dungeons and Dragons caused panic in parents and the media in the U.S. They thought D&D was causing teenage suicides—when in fact teenage D&D players committed suicide at a much lower rate than the national average.
    Errors of this type can be found from antiquity to the present, from the Peloponnesian War to the COVID-19 pandemic. How and why do we keep falling into these traps?

    In his new book Partial Truths, Dr. James C. Zimring argues that many of the mistakes the human mind consistently makes boil down to misperceiving fractions like percentages, probabilities, frequencies, and rates. Zimring also explores how these flaws might benefit us in problem-solving.

    James C. Zimring has a Ph.D. in immunology and an M.D., both awarded from Emory University. He is board certified in Clinical Pathology, a diplomate of the American Board of Pathology, and an elected member of the American Society of Clinical Investigation. Dr. Zimring has maintained an N.I.H. funded laboratory for over 20 years, has published over 170 research articles, and pursues research in diseases of the blood.

    COST: $25 general admission
    $35 VIP (includes premium seating)
    $45 Supporter (includes premium seating & pint glass)
    $15 Student

    TICKETS: Get tickets!

    WATCH LATER:
    The event will be recorded and available to watch online later on our Patreon page.

    Visit the Science On Tap website

    COVID POLICY
    Verbal vaccine confirmation required; masks encouraged.

  • Seeing the Big Picture: How the Brain Manipulates our Visual World

    Kiggins Theatre

    $20.00

    EVENT DESCRIPTION:
    When we open our eyes, are we perceiving reality? Why do we fail to agree on the color of “The Dress” (that went viral in 2015)? Have you ever glanced at ticking clock and noticed the second-hand suddenly freeze for a split second?

    Neuroscience research suggests that the brain evolved to make rapid, best-guesses about the objects in our environment, rather than create a one-to-one representation of the world. Through stories and demonstrations, Dr. Mark Pitzer will discuss some of the effects of this strategy and how our visual system can highlight some objects, delete others, and alter our conscious awareness in an attempt to help us navigate our visual world.

    We’re excited to welcome Mark Pitzer back to Science on Tap! (Remember that great Making Memories show??)

    Mark Pitzer, Ph.D. is a neuroscientist at the University of Portland. For the last 25 years he has worked to better understand and treat diseases of the brain, including Parkinson’s and Huntington’s diseases. Currently, his lab studies how developmental influences in the womb can alter the number of dopaminergic neurons involved in movement and reward.

    COVID Policy:
    Verbal vaccine confirmation required; masks encouraged.

    COST: $20 general admission
    $35 VIP (includes premium seating)
    $45 Supporter (includes premium seating & pint glass)
    $15 Student

    TICKETS: Get tickets!

    WATCH LATER:
    The event will be recorded and available to watch online later on our Patreon page.
    Visit the Science On Tap website