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Tired of stuffy library book clubs? Get together at a local restaurant (that's where the one drink minimum comes into play, though any menu item would do) to discuss this month's book. Fiction or non-fiction, paperback or hardcover, you'll read a new book every month. Come to laugh, learn, share stories and make new friends! Before you join the group, or email the organizer, PLEASE visit our FAQ here for more info: https://www.meetup.com/bookclub-1505/about/

Upcoming events (3)

'The 1619 Project' by Nikole Hannah-Jones (choice of book or podcast series)

** OUR 'NO SHOW' POLICY **: 'No Show' *once* and you're permanently dropped from our group.

** Note **: For our Black History Month title, you have the option of reading the new, expanded book version of this work or the 6 series podcast (about 3 1/2 hours). Alternatively you could also access the original NY Times issue.

Podcasts: https://www.nytimes.com/2020/01/23/podcasts/1619-podcast.html

(Book description from publisher):

#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • A dramatic expansion of a groundbreaking work of journalism, 'The 1619 Project: A New Origin Story' offers a profoundly revealing vision of the American past and present.

In late August 1619, a ship arrived in the British colony of Virginia bearing a cargo of twenty to thirty enslaved people from Africa. Their arrival led to the barbaric and unprecedented system of American chattel slavery that would last for the next 250 years. This is sometimes referred to as the country’s original sin, but it is more than that: It is the source of so much that still defines the United States.

The New York Times Magazine’s award-winning '1619 Project' issue reframed our understanding of American history by placing slavery and its continuing legacy at the center of our national narrative. This new book substantially expands on that work, weaving together eighteen essays that explore the legacy of slavery in present-day America with thirty-six poems and works of fiction that illuminate key moments of oppression, struggle, and resistance. The essays show how the inheritance of 1619 reaches into every part of contemporary American society, from politics, music, diet, traffic, and citizenship to capitalism, religion, and our democracy itself.

This is a book that speaks directly to our current moment, contextualizing the systems of race and caste within which we operate today. It reveals long-glossed-over truths around our nation’s founding and construction—and the way that the legacy of slavery did not end with emancipation, but continues to shape contemporary American life.

'Slouching Towards Bethlehem' by Joan Didion

To be determined

** OUR 'NO SHOW' POLICY **: 'No Show' *once* and you're permanently dropped from our group.

Celebrated, iconic, and indispensable, Joan Didion’s first work of nonfiction, "Slouching Towards Bethlehem", is considered a watershed moment in American writing. First published in 1968, the collection was critically praised as one of the “best prose written in this country.”

More than perhaps any other book, this collection by one of the most distinctive prose stylists of our era captures the unique time and place of Joan Didion’s focus, exploring subjects such as John Wayne and Howard Hughes, growing up in California and the nature of good and evil in a Death Valley motel room, and, especially, the essence of San Francisco’s Haight-Ashbury, the heart of the counterculture. As Joyce Carol Oates remarked: “[Didion] has been an articulate witness to the most stubborn and intractable truths of our time, a memorable voice, partly eulogistic, partly despairing; always in control.”

- (description from publisher Macmillan's website)

'Mercies in Disguise' by Gina Kolata

To be determined

** OUR 'NO SHOW' POLICY **: 'No Show' *once* and you're permanently dropped from our group.

"...a moving, suspenseful page-turner that's likely to become a classic of medical storytelling." —The Washington Post

New York Times science reporter Gina Kolata follows a family through genetic illness and one courageous daughter who decides her fate shall no longer be decided by a genetic flaw.

The phone rings. The doctor from California is on the line. “Are you ready Amanda?” The two people Amanda Baxley loves the most had begged her not to be tested—at least, not now. But she had to find out.

If your family carried a mutated gene that foretold a brutal illness and you were offered the chance to find out if you’d inherited it, would you do it? Would you walk toward the problem, bravely accepting whatever answer came your way? Or would you avoid the potential bad news as long as possible?

In "Mercies in Disguise", acclaimed New York Times science reporter and bestselling author Gina Kolata tells the story of the Baxleys, an almost archetypal family in a small town in South Carolina. A proud and determined clan, many of them doctors, they are struck one by one with an inscrutable illness. They finally discover the cause of the disease after a remarkable sequence of events that many saw as providential. Meanwhile, science, progressing for a half a century along a parallel track, had handed the Baxleys a resolution—not a cure, but a blood test that would reveal who had the gene for the disease and who did not. And science would offer another dilemma—fertility specialists had created a way to spare the children through an expensive process.

A work of narrative nonfiction, Mercies in Disguise is the story of a family that took matters into its own hands when the medical world abandoned them. It’s a story of a family that had to deal with unspeakable tragedy and yet did not allow it to tear them apart. And it is the story of a young woman—Amanda Baxley—who faced the future head on, determined to find a way to disrupt her family’s destiny.

- (description from publisher Macmillan's website; photo from The Atlanta-Journal Constitution)

Past events (285)

'The Code of the Woosters' by P.G. Wodehouse

Online event

Photos (201)

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